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2020 Chrysler Voyager Off to a Five-Star Start in Crash Tests

2020 Chrysler Voyager

Chrysler’s 2020 Voyager minivan has earned a top five-star safety rating from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s New Car Assessment Program. That’s to be expected since the new Voyager actually is just a new model name for the former low-price L and LX trim levels of the Pacifica, which also has a five-star rating for the 2020 model year.

Related: Your Cheap Pacifica Is Now the 2020 Chrysler Voyager

The Pacifica L and LX budget trim levels got a new badge and a new name for 2020 that revives the Voyager name best known in the U.S. for vans from Chrysler’s now-defunct Plymouth brand.

NHTSA’s five-star safety system awards an overall score based on frontal and side crash performance and resistance to rolling over. The 2020 Voyager, like the Pacifica, earned five stars in front and side crash testing, and four stars for rollover resistance. NHTSA also recommends certain safety technologies, including forward collision warning and automatic emergency braking, and notes their availability but does not count their presence or absence in the overall score.

The 2020 Voyager and 2020 Pacifica minivans have not yet been rated in the more rigorous testing by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. IIHS rates the 2019 Pacifica a Top Safety Pick, its penultimate award, for Pacificas equipped with optional front crash prevention plus automatic braking and specific headlights.

The Voyager currently does not offer a front collision system with automatic braking, so it would not qualify for that award. And the blind spot warning with rear cross-traffic alert that were standard on 2019 Pacificas now are optional on the Voyager as part of a $495 package.

For more details on NHTSA crash testing or to see star ratings for specific vehicles, head to nhtsa.gov.

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