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2020 Nissan Titan: 6 Pros and 3 Cons

nissan-titan-xd-2020-02-angle--exterior--front--red.jpg 2020 Nissan Titan XD | Cars.com photo by Aaron Bragman

The Nissan Titan is refreshed and revamped for 2020. Typically an outlier in the full-size pickup truck category, a host of upgrades for the new model year may help bring it closer to the mainstream.

Related: 2020 Nissan Titan Review: No Longer a ‘Yeah, But’ Truck

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Since its inception, the Nissan Titan has found it difficult to compete with its Ford, Chevrolet and Ram counterparts, which dominate the full-size truck market. For 2020, the Titan gets quite a few changes for a mid-cycle refresh. Updated styling inside and out, modern tech and safety features, a more powerful engine and a new nine-speed transmission might make the Titanmore of a competitor than it used to be.

Considering a Titan for your garage and want the total rundown? Check out a comprehensive review by Cars.com’s Aaron Bragman through the related link above. For the rapid-fire list, here are the 2020 Nissan Titan pros and cons:

Things We Like

1. More Fun to Drive

A 5.6-liter V-8 direct-injection engine is standard on the refreshed Titan — and, it’s the only engine option. Cranking out 400 horsepower and 413 pounds-feet of torque with premium fuel, Nissan claims this is the most powerful V-8 in the full-size pickup class. That power is evident when accelerating from a standing stop. It’s mated to a new nine-speed automatic transmission that shifts smoothly even while towing. Rear-wheel drive is standard and four-wheel drive is optional. The Titan also handles well, with good steering feedback. It feels controlled whether you’re cruising at highway speeds or navigating a curvy road.

nissan-titan-2020-11-brown--cockpit-shot--front-row--interior--tan--two-tone--upholstery.jpg 2020 Nissan Titan | Cars.com photo by Aaron Bragman

2. Improved Infotainment and Tech

Tech gets a major update in this Titan, too. A standard 8-inch multimedia touchscreen on the dash houses the infotainment system. Apple CarPlay and Android Auto connectivity are also standard. If that’s not large enough, you can bump up to the optional 9-inch Integrated Command Center display, the touchscreen of which Nissan says has higher resolution than high-definition video. For the driver, there’s a new, programmable 7-inch digital information display in the gauge cluster. Available onboard Wi-Fi (subscription required) now allows up to seven devices to connect with a paid subscription. A 12-speaker, 485-watt Fender premium audio system is optional.

nissan-titan-2020-01-angle--exterior--front--red.jpg 2020 Nissan Titan | Cars.com photo by Aaron Bragman

3. Updated Exterior

On the outside, the Nissan Titan gets a minor face-lift — a new grille, head and taillights, bumpers and tailgate finishers. The specific styling of different models is meant to differentiate between trim levels. While the changes are subtle, they make the Titan look more like Nissan’s other updated vehicles. One new feature is an LED bed lighting system that allows you to see what you’re hauling.

4. Comfortable Interior

The new styling carries over to the inside of the truck as well. The materials at common touchpoints — the doors, dashboard and console — are upgraded, especially in the upper trims.  A carryover from the last model, the “zero-gravity” seats in the front and back are quite comfortable. New for 2020 is an optional dual-panel panoramic moonroof. Available on the crew-cab models, it’s one of the largest in its class.

nissan-titan-2020-26-interior--second-row.jpg 2020 Nissan Titan | Cars.com photo by Aaron Bragman

5. Standard Safety

Nissan’s Safety Shield 360 suite of features is standard across all trim levels of the Titan. It includes lane departure warning, rear cross-traffic alert and automatic emergency braking that works in both forward and reverse. Optional features include distance-keeping cruise control, a driver alertness monitor and a forward collision warning system.

6. Off-Road Chops

The Pro-4X trim is the off-road-oriented version of the Titan. Its four-wheel-drive system features hill descent control and hill start assist, as well an electronic locking rear differential. Off-road trail cameras and side-view tire-positioning cameras also help guide you over obstacles. An advanced off-road gauge calculates the tire, pitch and roll angles using accelerometers to provide data to the driver.

More From Cars.com and PickupTrucks.com:

Things We Don’t

1. ‘Bunkerlike’ Cabin

While the interior is comfortable, the Titan’s high dashboard and short windshield make for a cabin that feels more compact than that of competitors like the Ford F-150 or Ram 1500. The backseat is somewhat cramped. Headroom and legroom are OK, but again, a bit tight when compared to other trucks in this class. Headroom especially suffers in models with the dual-panel panoramic moonroof.

nissan-titan-2020-10-bed--exterior--rear--red.jpg 2020 Nissan Titan | Cars.com photo by Aaron Bragman

2. Not a Lot to Customize

The 2020 Titan  has just one powertrain, one wheelbase and a choice between the King (extended) Cab or crew cab. The King Cab is only available in the S, SV and Pro-4X trims, leaving few build combinations for those who want options.

3. Pricier Than Previous Models

A top-to-bottom refresh and all the updates therein really show in the pricing of the 2020 Titan.  The cheapest model, the Titan S 4×2 King Cab, starts at $37,785 (including a $1,595 destination charge), which is $2,550 higher than the 2019 version. The biggest price jump is on the loaded Titan Platinum Reserve 4×4 crew cab, which comes in at $5,670 more than the outgoing model.

nissan-titan-2020-07-exterior--rear--red--tailgate.jpg 2020 Nissan Titan | Cars.com photo by Aaron Bragman

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