Civics Lesson: Honda Raises Civic Type R Price a Lot, Others a Little

2018 Honda Civic Type R

Some automakers have rolled out half-year models with updated features, such as Nissan with its 2017.5 Rogue. Honda has now done something similar with its strong-selling Civics — but the only feature that's changed is the window sticker. If you want the hot 2018 Civic Type R hatch, you'll have to pay $605 more, while the starting prices of more everyday 2018 Civic models have gone up $105.

Related: 2017 Honda Civic Type R: What's Up With the Wing?

The price increases, all effective May 1, include a $5 increase in the inescapable destination charge. That means the "2018.5" Civic Type R now starts at $35,595, including $895 for destination.

It's the second price increase in six months for the Type R, which went up $215 for 2018 after the short 2017 intro year. It remains a relative hot-hatch bargain in performance for the dollar, though. And there are 103 of the 2018s listed by dealers on Cars.com today, most of which would have the pre-May 1 stickers.

Even with some options, it is under the $40,635 starting price for a stick-shift version of the rival Volkswagen Golf Type R. And it's already well-equipped for the base price, with a 306-horsepower, turbocharged 2.0-liter, six-speed manual, adaptive suspension, Brembo front brakes, 20-inch wheels and 7-inch touchscreen with navigation.

The regular Civic sedan, meanwhile, now starts at $19,835 with manual shift and destination, up from $19,730 in April. That $105 boost runs up through the trim levels, with the top Touring sedan now starting at $27,695. The Civic hatchback's new starting price is $21,045, and the Civic coupe now starts at $20,245.

The only Civics to escape the bump in price — except for the $5 additional destination charge — are the sporty Si models, which now start at $24,995 for the coupe or sedan.

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