View Local Inventory
SAVE

2007 Lincoln Navigator

$5,856 — $16,104 USED
Sport Utility
7-8 Seats
15 MPG
(Combined)
Key specs of the base trim
 — 
Compare 1 trims

Overview

Is this the car for you?

The Good

  • Power-adjustable pedals
  • Heated and cooled front seats
  • Standard stability system with Roll Stability Control
  • Standard side curtain-type airbags for all three rows

The Bad

  • Overly ornate gauges, interior trim pieces
  • Poor gas mileage likely

What to Know

about the 2007 Lincoln Navigator
  • Redesigned for 2007
  • Distinctive chrome grille
  • New long-wheelbase version
  • 300-hp, 5.4-liter V-8

Our Take

from the Cars.com expert editorial team

by David Thomas - Lincoln didn't redesign the new Navigator from the ground up, like Cadillac did with its latest Escalade, but it sure did a number inside and out to make it look completely different. The Navigator's appearance could be its major selling point, because in most other ways it doesn't stand out. The question is: How many buyers will like the looks enough to buy it, and will they like it enough to pick it over the all-new Escalade?

The Bling Factor
The dumbest question an automotive journalist could pose in regard to the new Lincoln Navigator would be, "What do you notice first when looking at it?" Duh! It might as well be called the Blingmobile, as my wife and I nicknamed it, thanks to its giant, diamond-cut chrome grille. Wait a second, is that chrome? Nope; chrome is very expensive these days and is rarely used on new cars and trucks. The grille is actually painted plastic, and when you get up close you can tell it isn't substantial. It sure looks real from far away, though, and will look that way to the people and drivers you pass on the street.

Personally, I liked the old blade-like grille on the previous Navigator and thought it could have been enlarged and chromed for the 2007 version, much like the Lincoln Mark LT's. That's enough virtual ink devoted to the grille, I think, and at least the headlights are well-integrated into the otherwise busy design. Take a walk around the rest of the Navigator and you'll wonder why it's so busy up ...

by David Thomas - Lincoln didn't redesign the new Navigator from the ground up, like Cadillac did with its latest Escalade, but it sure did a number inside and out to make it look completely different. The Navigator's appearance could be its major selling point, because in most other ways it doesn't stand out. The question is: How many buyers will like the looks enough to buy it, and will they like it enough to pick it over the all-new Escalade?

The Bling Factor
The dumbest question an automotive journalist could pose in regard to the new Lincoln Navigator would be, "What do you notice first when looking at it?" Duh! It might as well be called the Blingmobile, as my wife and I nicknamed it, thanks to its giant, diamond-cut chrome grille. Wait a second, is that chrome? Nope; chrome is very expensive these days and is rarely used on new cars and trucks. The grille is actually painted plastic, and when you get up close you can tell it isn't substantial. It sure looks real from far away, though, and will look that way to the people and drivers you pass on the street.

Personally, I liked the old blade-like grille on the previous Navigator and thought it could have been enlarged and chromed for the 2007 version, much like the Lincoln Mark LT's. That's enough virtual ink devoted to the grille, I think, and at least the headlights are well-integrated into the otherwise busy design. Take a walk around the rest of the Navigator and you'll wonder why it's so busy up front when from every other angle the design is incredibly subtle. My black test vehicle was the perfect color, and I couldn't really fathom anyone going for anything else — though I saw one in purple recently, and certainly that would not go unnoticed.

Interior
Inside the cabin, big, plush seats welcome the driver and passengers. There's a giant center armrest with storage between the driver and the front passenger seat, as well as one splitting the second-row seats. Up front, the center console sports four cupholders for the incredibly thirsty traveler, but it didn't fit much other stuff. Besides the cavernous center console, there were no smaller cubbies for things like breath mints, change, a cell phone, etc., and that actually left me feeling a bit cramped, even though there's no shortage of head, leg or hip room.

The huge dashboard didn't leave a great impression on anyone during our week with the Navigator. There's something odd in the texture of Lincoln's new interior plastic. It's hard to put my finger on what it is, but it doesn't seem nice enough to be in a pseudo-luxury vehicle — though it isn't what I would call cheap, either. My wife immediately voiced her preference for the Cadillac Escalade's passenger seat. We spent considerable time in both SUVs, and her immediate distaste for the Navigator isn't shocking if you compare the two interiors side by side.

There were some highlights on the inside. For one, I loved the retro gauges. They reminded me of my grandfather's Cadillacs of the 1970s and early '80s. Easy to read and extremely distinctive, the gauges make an elegant statement.

The third row was about as cramped as any third row in a large SUV these days, but the power fold option was nifty to watch. You'll probably end up hitting that switch an extra time or two, because it's just that cool.

By far, the best feature was the ability to enter the Navigator with ease via automatic power-extending running boards that remain hidden until a door is opened. This received high marks from my petite mother-in-law during the holiday season, and even I appreciated the resulting shorter step into the driver's seat. They're offered as a $1,095 option on their own, as well as part of a larger option package. I would say it's probably the most useful option I've found in any large SUV, and Lincoln was generous to offer it as a stand-alone option.

Performance
A big SUV is all about imposing looks and a muscular engine. The Navigator has the looks part down, but the 300-horsepower V-8 engine seems woefully lacking in the power department, especially at takeoff. There was zero excitement about pressing the gas pedal, and leaving a stoplight never elicited joy of any kind.

Steering, on the other hand, was surprisingly accurate and relatively light for an SUV. When driving a large vehicle it's often hard to tell how wheel input will translate to the road, but not in the Navigator.

Unfortunately, the brakes didn't offer the same great feedback and were unreliable in bad weather; I made sure to give myself extra room in highway and city driving. Even the best of brakes would have a tough time slowing down so much weight, and Lincoln should consider upgrading these stoppers, even though they're already of the four-wheel-disc antilock variety.

The ride was pleasant on most surfaces, but nothing spectacular; wind noise was also pronounced, as you would expect. The comfortable seats and soft suspension were both welcome on long rides.

Mileage is rated at 13/18 mpg (city/highway), and the trip computer stated I was averaging 14 mpg with a lot of highway miles. After a full tank fill up, the mileage was just under 13 mpg. That might sound horrible, but considering the class and how often I was trying to test the V-8's throttle response, it's probably a positive for the Navigator.

Safety
There's a standard brake-based stability control system with rollover mitigation, and a tire pressure monitoring system, both of which are must-haves for large SUVs. Tire pressure is always important to keep an eye on, and even more so with SUVs. There are three rows of side curtain airbags, along with seat-mounted side airbags for the driver and front passenger.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration gave the Navigator a five-out-of-five-star frontal crash-test rating and a four-out-of-five-star rollover rating for the four-wheel-drive model. The Navigator has not been crash tested by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, which has a more stringent testing process than NHTSA.

Will You Navigate?
There's nothing inherently wrong with the new Lincoln Navigator that would make me say someone shouldn't buy one. If the looks grab you, then it makes perfect sense. If you're remotely on the fence about picking the Escalade, the near-$10,000 difference in price between the $45,755 Navigator and the $54,500 Escalade could be the difference, though many drivers would be just as happy with a Ford Expedition Eddie Bauer Edition for $35,575 as with a luxury SUV.

If price and value were the only requirements, the Navigator and Escalade wouldn't even exist. Some buyers want to make a statement with their SUV, and in that way the Navigator certainly rises above the luxury competition without sapping the kids' college fund. If the wallet isn't a factor, the Escalade still wins the all-American Blingmobile prize.

Send David an email 


Consumer Reviews

What drivers are saying

4.2
20 reviews — Read All reviews
Exterior Styling
(4.5)
Performance
(4.1)
Interior Design
(4.6)
Comfort
(4.7)
Reliability
(4.2)
Value For The Money
(4.1)

Read reviews that mention:

(5.0)

Great family car

by Navlover from West palm beach, Florida on October 8, 2018

The Navigator is great for a large and family yet much cooler than a minivan. Classy and had been very reliable . Would buy again.....we did. We purchased a second one Read full review

(5.0)

Charismatic and Elegant Family car

by URGENC from Baton Rouge on August 13, 2018

Wow, what can I say about this generation of Navigators. I named mine the The Admiral, because of its charisma and the ability of overcoming all types of terrain and weather conditions. For the second ... Read full review

Safety

Recalls and crash tests

Recalls

The 2007 Lincoln Navigator currently has 2 recalls


Crash and Rollover Test Ratings

The 2007 Lincoln Navigator has not been tested.

Latest 2007 Navigator Stories

Change year or vehicle

0 / 0 0 Photos
0 / 0

Cars.com Car Seat Check

Certified child passenger safety technicians conduct hands-on tests of a car’s Latch system and check the vehicle’s ability to accommodate different types of car seats. The Navigator received the following grades on a scale of A-F.*
* This score may not apply to all trims, especially for vehicles with multiple body styles that affect the space and design of the seating.

Warranty FAQs

What is a Bumper-to-Bumper warranty?

Often called a basic warranty or new-vehicle warranty, a bumper-to-bumper policy covers components like air conditioning, audio systems, vehicle sensors, fuel systems and major electrical components. Most policies exclude regular maintenance like fluid top offs and oil changes, but a few brands have separate free-maintenance provisions, and those that do offer them is slowly rising. Bumper-to-bumper warranties typically expire faster than powertrain warranties.

What is a Powertrain warranty?

Don't be misled a 10-year or 100,000-mile powertrain warranty doesn't promise a decade of free repairs for your car. It typically covers just the engine and transmission, along with any other moving parts that lead to the wheels, like the driveshaft and constant velocity joints. Some automakers also bundle seat belts and airbags into their powertrain warranties. With a few exceptions, powertrain warranties don't cover regular maintenance like engine tuneups and tire rotations.

What is included in Roadside Assistance?

Some automakers include roadside assistance with their bumper-to-bumper or powertrain warranties, while others have separate policies. These programs cover anything from flat-tire changes and locksmith services to jump-starts and towing. Few reimburse incidental costs like motel rooms (if you have to wait for repairs).

What other services could be included in a warranty?

Some automakers include free scheduled maintenance for items such as oil changes, air filters and tire rotations. Some include consumables including brake pads and windshield wipers; others do not. They are typically for the first couple of years of ownership of a new car.

What does CPO mean?

A certified pre-owned or CPO car has been inspected to meet minimum quality standards and typically includes some type of warranty. While dealers and third parties certify cars, the gold standard is an automaker-certified vehicle that provides a factory-backed warranty, often extending the original coverage. Vehicles must be in excellent condition and have low miles and wear to be certified, which is why off-lease vehicles feed many CPO programs.

See also the latest CPO incentives by automaker