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10 Biggest News Stories of the Week: Land Rover Rolls Over 2021 Kia Sorento, Genesis GV80

2020 Land Rover Defender

Who makes Land Rover, you want to know? Well, if we told you here, that’d spoil the surprise that lies just one click away in Cars.com’s most popular article of the week. It’s understandable that you’d be asking that question, as the names of the vehicles in the iconic British off-road SUV brand’s lineup can become a bit of “Rover” soup. On one hand, you have, say, the Land Rover Defender or Land Rover Discovery — not too difficult — but then you get into the Range Rover (which a lot of people seem to mistake for its own car brand rather than a model), and you can end up trying to decipher something like “Land Rover Range Rover SVAutobiography Dynamic Edition.”

Related: 10 Biggest Chicago Auto Show Stories: 2021 Genesis GV80 Gives Up Little Ground

“Wait, so … a Land Rover and a Range Rover are the same thing?” No, not exactly. All Range Rovers are Land Rovers, but all Land Rovers aren’t Range Rovers. Make sense yet? No? Don’t fret: We’ve taken the liberty of sorting it all out for you, so just follow the link below to our No. 1 story, which breaks down the somewhat complicated answer to a seemingly simple question.

Land Rover landing at No. 1 meant that our continuing coverage of the breadcrumb trail Kia is dropping on its redesigned-for-2021 Sorento SUV’s path to the Geneva motor show in March had to settle for second place. The Sorento should be used to that by now after months of all the attention going to its all-new-for-2020 brand sibling, the larger Telluride — but where the Telluride positions itself as an outdoorsy, off-road-adjacent SUV, the smaller Sorento is more of a city mouse.

2021 Kia Sorento

“Where the Telluride zigs, the Sorento zags, eschewing its larger sibling’s rugged vibe for something more sleek and modern,” Cars.com’s Brian Wong writes in our No. 2 story of the week. “If the Telluride looks more at home in a field slinging mud, the Sorento’s place is in an urban environment among glass-and-steel skyscrapers. Its smaller footprint will also make it a bit easier for folks who live in or have to park in cities, where every inch can matter.”

2021 Genesis GV80

Helping round out the top five this week are a couple of the Sorento’s extended-family members in the just-introduced 2021 Genesis GV80 (the all-new SUV from the luxury arm of the Hyundai part of parent company Hyundai-Kia), as well as the 2020 Hyundai Palisade, at Nos. 3 and 4, respectively. The GV80 made its major-auto-show debut at the 2020 Chicago Auto Show, and we compared it to one of its major market rivals, the Lincoln Aviator, while the Palisade — Cars.com’s Best of 2020 award winner and newest member of the long-term test-car fleet at our Chicago home base — was the subject of a rapid-fire rundown of all things we like (and like less) about the all-new SUV. Finally, at No. 5 was our report on J.D. Power’s 2020 U.S. Vehicle Dependability Study, which named Genesis, Lexus, Buick, Porsche and Toyota as the most reliable car brands.

2020 Hyundai Palisade

The 2021 Chrysler Pacifica, 2020 Ford Explorer and 2020 Nissan Titan XD await below the fold (that’s an old newspaper reference … newspapers used to be how people got their news before the internet and … oh, forget it), so be sure to keep reading. Here are the top 10 news stories Cars.com readers couldn’t get enough of in the past week:

1. Who Makes Land Rover?

2. 2020 Kia Sorento Very Much Alive and Kicking

3. Auto Show Face-off: 2021 Genesis GV80 Vs. 2020 Lincoln Aviator

4. 2020 Hyundai Palisade: 8 Things We Like (and 7 Not So Much)

5. What Are the Most Reliable Cars for 2020? (Hint: Genesis, Lexus Make ‘Em)

6. Auto Show Face-Off: 2021 Chrysler Pacifica Vs. 2020 Honda Odyssey Vs. 2020 Toyota Sienna

7. 2020 Ford Explorer: 6 Things We Like and 4 Things We Don’t

8. What’s the Best New-Car Deal for February 2020?

9. 8 Cars, SUVs and Pickups Electrifying 2020

10. 2020 Nissan Titan XD Review: More Power, More Payload, More Sense

Cars.com’s Editorial department is your source for automotive news and reviews. In line with Cars.com’s long-standing ethics policy, editors and reviewers don’t accept gifts or free trips from automakers. The Editorial department is independent of Cars.com’s advertising, sales and sponsored content departments.

 
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