NEWS

2020 Audi Q7: Everything You Need to Know

audi-q7-2020-4-badge--exterior--front--grile--outdoors--white.jpg 2020 Audi Q7 | Cars.com photo by Brian Wong

Audi’s three-row SUV, the Q7, got a host of updates for 2020, including exterior styling borrowed from the all-new Q8 as well as a revised multimedia system and dash layout. There’s also a new engine option: a turbocharged 3.0-liter V-6. It sounds the same, but it’s a different engine than the outgoing model and horsepower is up slightly. The base 248-horsepower, turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine carries over from 2019.

Related: 2021 Audi RS Q8: The School Drop-Off Lane Just Got a Lot Cooler

Shop the 2020 Audi Q7 near you

Used
2020 Audi Q7 55 Prestige
46,576 mi.
$54,988 $1,000 price drop
Good Deal
Home Delivery
Virtual Appointments
Used
2020 Audi Q7 55 Prestige
16,167 mi.
$59,650 $270 price drop
Fair Deal
Home Delivery
Virtual Appointments

Inside, the new multimedia system is the biggest story. The Q7 trades its rotary dial and slew of buttons for Audi’s latest two-screen setup. The upper display is 10.1 inches and the lower measures 8.6 inches; they’re joined by another 12.3-inch screen in the instrument panel that is powered by a second generation of Audi’s Virtual Cockpit. Wireless Apple CarPlay and wired Android Auto are standard.

Interested in this luxury family SUV? We’ve driven it, compared it back-to-back with rivals and also covered pricing, specs and more. Here is a roundup of our comprehensive coverage, which can tell you everything you need to know about the 2020 Audi Q7:

2020 Audi Q7 Review: Quibbles With the Biggest Q

2020 Audi Q7: New Screens, New Smile 

2020 Audi SQ7: 500-HP SUV Fits Family, Hauls Ass

2020 Audi Q7 Gets Four-Cylinder After All, Lower Base Price (and Worse MPG)

2020 Audi SQ7 and SQ8: 6 Things Performance SUV Shoppers Will Wanna Know

What We Know About the New Audi Q7 

New Audi Q7 Queues Up to Come to America

More From Cars.com:

Cars.com’s Editorial department is your source for automotive news and reviews. In line with Cars.com’s long-standing ethics policy, editors and reviewers don’t accept gifts or free trips from automakers. The Editorial department is independent of Cars.com’s advertising, sales and sponsored content departments.

Latest expert reviews