View Local Inventory
Save

2019 Volkswagen Tiguan

2019 Volkswagen Tiguan

Change year or vehicle
$17,340 — $41,508 NEW and USED
80
Photos
SUV
5-7 Seats
24-25 MPG
(Combined)
Key specs of the base trim
 — 
Compare 7 trims

Overview

Is this the car for you?

The Good

  • Responsive steering
  • Crisp handling
  • Highway stability
  • Responsive transmission
  • Premium interior
  • First- and second-row comfort

The Bad

  • Modest high-speed passing power
  • Gas-pedal lag when starting off
  • Ride quality with 20-inch wheels
  • Third row uncomfortable for adults
  • Hard plastic dash trim not great for resting knee
  • Some functions needlessly complex
2019 Volkswagen Tiguan exterior side view

What to Know

about the 2019 Volkswagen Tiguan
  • Compact SUV seats five or seven
  • Turbo four-cylinder, eight-speed automatic
  • Front- or all-wheel drive
  • Apple CarPlay, Android Auto standard
  • Automatic emergency braking available
  • Six-year/72,000-mile warranty

We’re looking for the best deals on a Volkswagen near you…

Are you looking for more listings?

Change location

Please enter a valid 5-digit ZIP code.

Search Again

— OR —

Sign up for listing notifications

Sign Up

2019 Volkswagen Tiguan Review

from the Cars.com expert editorial team

What's the best compact SUV for 2019? To find out, we put seven popular models against one another in multiple days of testing. Watch the video to see what we thought.

By Mike Hanley

The verdict: With sporty driving characteristics and a premium interior, the 2019 Volkswagen Tiguan isn’t like a lot of other compact SUVs available today — and that’s a good thing.

Versus the competition: In a recent Cars.com comparison test of well-equipped compact SUVs, including segment heavyweights like the Honda CR-V and Toyota RAV4, the Volkswagen Tiguan came in first thanks to an unmatched combination of driving refinement, interior luxury and occupant comfort, as well as strong showings in our cargo versatility and child-safety seat evaluations.

The popularity of compact SUVs is booming as shoppers trade their cars for the higher seating position, greater cargo versatility and available all-wheel drive SUVs offer. To get a read on the current state of the market, we tested seven 2019 models — the Honda CR-V, Hyundai Tucson, Jeep Cherokee, Nissan Rogue, Subaru Forester, Toyota RAV4 and Volkswagen Tiguan — over the course of a few days. For more details on what we tested and how they finished, check out our 2019 Compact SUV Challenge.

Volkswagen sent us a Tiguan SEL Premium R-Line with all-wheel drive. Its as-tested price of $40,485 — including a $995 destination charge — made it the most expensive SUV in our test. Our comparison focused on higher-end trim levels, but a high price didn’t automatically translate to a strong finish; the second- and third-place Forester and Tucson had two of the lower prices in the group, while the second-most-expensive e...

The verdict: With sporty driving characteristics and a premium interior, the 2019 Volkswagen Tiguan isn’t like a lot of other compact SUVs available today — and that’s a good thing.

Versus the competition: In a recent Cars.com comparison test of well-equipped compact SUVs, including segment heavyweights like the Honda CR-V and Toyota RAV4, the Volkswagen Tiguan came in first thanks to an unmatched combination of driving refinement, interior luxury and occupant comfort, as well as strong showings in our cargo versatility and child-safety seat evaluations.

The popularity of compact SUVs is booming as shoppers trade their cars for the higher seating position, greater cargo versatility and available all-wheel drive SUVs offer. To get a read on the current state of the market, we tested seven 2019 models — the Honda CR-V, Hyundai Tucson, Jeep Cherokee, Nissan Rogue, Subaru Forester, Toyota RAV4 and Volkswagen Tiguan — over the course of a few days. For more details on what we tested and how they finished, check out our 2019 Compact SUV Challenge.

Volkswagen sent us a Tiguan SEL Premium R-Line with all-wheel drive. Its as-tested price of $40,485 — including a $995 destination charge — made it the most expensive SUV in our test. Our comparison focused on higher-end trim levels, but a high price didn’t automatically translate to a strong finish; the second- and third-place Forester and Tucson had two of the lower prices in the group, while the second-most-expensive entrant, the Cherokee, finished sixth.

The Tiguan we drove was packed with features like a panoramic moonroof, leather upholstery, an all-digital instrument panel and a Fender premium stereo, as well as important active-safety features like automatic emergency braking with pedestrian detection. (See how the Tiguan compares with the CR-V Touring, RAV4 Limited and Cherokee Limited here.)

How It Drives

The Tiguan’s driving manners set it apart. With light-effort, responsive steering and crisp handling on suburban streets and interstate highways alike, the Tiguan was the most fun to drive. And thanks to a settled, stable feel on the highway, it was the only one I’d be interested in taking on a long road trip; the others felt too skittish at highway speeds. The Subaru Forester’s engaging driving experience also impressed, but its highway manners fell short of the Tiguan’s.

The Tiguan’s drivetrain makes enough power to avoid feeling sluggish. All trim levels are powered by a 184-horsepower, turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine that drives an eight-speed automatic transmission. The Tiguan accelerates up to highway speeds well enough, but high-speed passing power is modest. There’s some gas-pedal lag when accelerating from a standstill, but selecting the automatic transmission’s Sport mode erases it. There’s no persistent engine drone like you get in the Rogue and RAV4. On our mileage drive, the Tiguan’s real-world fuel economy of 26.5 mpg was mid-pack; the RAV4’s 29 mpg was the best.

The Tiguan’s clear handling advantage does come with a downside: an at-times-harsh ride. The significance of that will largely depend on where you live: On decent roads, the Tiguan’s ride quality was no worse than the other SUVs we tested (they all skew firm), but potholed roads revealed a brittle, harsh ride that was less forgiving than the other SUVs we tested — especially the Cherokee, which has a refined ride on even the worst pavement. The Tiguan was the only SUV in our comparison test with 20-inch wheels, and they were fitted with the lowest-profile tires. This wheel-and-tire choice likely contributed to the Tiguan’s handling prowess, but we’d gladly give up some handling capability for better ride quality if that’s what the SUV’s available 17-, 18- and 19-inch wheels offer.

The Inside

You should expect a lot from a $40,000-plus compact SUV, and our Tiguan SEL Premium’s cabin largely delivered. There was a richness and consistency to the materials that wasn’t present in the other SUVs we tested; even the Tiguan’s hard-plastic trim seemed more upscale. The materials are complemented by luxury-grade features, like an available all-digital instrument cluster screen and details like a steering wheel finished with intricate stitching.

First- and second-row occupants ride in comfort, too: the Tiguan received the highest marks from the judges for its front and rear seats. The front bucket seats have bigger-than-average bolsters on the seat cushion, which you’ll have to clear when getting in and out, but the seats are wide and comfortable. The sliding and reclining second-row bench seat is also very comfortable, with generous legroom for adult passengers in the seat’s rearmost position.

The Tiguan was the only SUV in our comparison test with a third-row seat. A $595 option on all-wheel-drive models (it’s standard with front-wheel drive), the two-passenger third row can carry adults but is designed for children; taller adults who venture back there must endure an uncomfortable, hunched-forward seating position because of the seat’s proximity to the floor and its limited headroom.

Multimedia and Controls

A 6.5-inch touchscreen multimedia system with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto smartphone connectivity is standard, but higher trims get an 8-inch touchscreen and SEL trims add built-in navigation. SE and higher trims have three USB ports instead of the single port on the base S.

There are touch-sensitive controls on either side of the larger touchscreen, and you’ll have to be mindful not to brush against them when using the volume and tuning knobs, or you’ll end up in a different part of the system. The touchscreens in the Cherokee and Tucson had slightly better usability overall.

Cargo

The Tiguan’s cargo score tied the CR-V’s for best in our comparison. While the CR-V’s rating was driven by the SUV’s largest-in-test cargo volume, the Tiguan — which had a bit less cargo space with its third row folded — benefited from features like a sliding second-row seat with a 40/20/40-split backrest, which enhanced its versatility. The Tiguan includes a spot under the cargo floor for storing the cargo cover when it’s not in use.

Safety

The Tiguan received the highest rating, good, in all Insurance Institute for Highway Safety crashworthiness tests. It got the top rating, superior, for front crash prevention when equipped with optional Front Assist, which includes forward collision warning with automatic emergency braking and pedestrian detection. However, the LED headlights on SEL Premium and higher trims are rated marginal by IIHS, and the SUV’s Latch connectors earned just an acceptable rating (we graded the Tiguan’s Latch connectors higher in our Car Seat Check).

Other optional active-safety features include blind spot warning with rear cross-traffic alert, adaptive cruise control with stop-and-go capability, and lane-keeping assist.

How It Won

The overarching theme of our 2019 Compact SUV Challenge was how close the contestants were in many categories, and this sentiment came through in the scoring: The seventh-place Rogue and the second-place Forester were separated by just 94 out of a possible 1,000 points.

The Tiguan, though, separated itself from the pack; it won outright or tied for first in nine categories — three times more than any other SUV in the test — while it tied for worst only once, in our real-world fuel economy test. But even its observed gas mileage was only 2.5 mpg lower than the most-efficient RAV4. It was this well-rounded performance that elevated the Tiguan above the competition and powered its convincing win.

Cars.com’s Editorial department is your source for automotive news and reviews. In line with Cars.com’s long-standing ethics policy, editors and reviewers don’t accept gifts or free trips from automakers. The Editorial department is independent of Cars.com’s advertising, sales and sponsored content departments.

Consumer Reviews

What drivers are saying

4.7
129 reviews — Read All reviews
Exterior Styling
(4.6)
Performance
(4.5)
Interior Design
(4.6)
Comfort
(4.7)
Reliability
(4.6)
Value For The Money
(4.7)

Read reviews that mention:

(4.0)

I Love My Tiggy

by Intellblkm from Cleveland, Ohio on August 27, 2020

I Traded my my '09 CC VR6 edition for the Tiguan. Mt tiguan is better on gas, very comfortable. My only complaint is performance. It has a 2.0Turbo 184 Hp. Could use a V6. Its sluggish out of first ... Read full review

(5.0)

Impressed so far!

by Chris from Clarks Summit, PA on July 31, 2020

Bought the 2019 Tiguan after driving a 2017 Passat R-Line. Had the Tiguan a week and truly surprised at the vehicle. More power than my Passat had and best value for the money. Granted it only been a ... Read full review

Safety

Recalls and crash tests

Recalls

The 2019 Volkswagen Tiguan currently has 3 recalls


Crash and Rollover Test Ratings

Based on 2019 Volkswagen Tiguan 2.0T S

IIHS rates vehicles good, acceptable, marginal, or poor.

Child Seat Anchors (Latch)

Ease of Use
acceptable

Crash Avoidance and Mitigation

Front Crash Prevention
superior

Head Restraints and Seats

Dynamic Rating
good
Overall Rear
good
Seat Head/Restraint Geometry
good

Headlights

Overall Rating
poor

Moderate overlap front

Chest
good
Head/Neck
good
Left Leg/Foot
good
Overall Front
good
Restraints
good
Right Leg/Foot
good
Structure/safety cage
good

Other

Roof Strength
good

Side

Driver Head Protection
good
Driver Head and Neck
good
Driver Pelvis/Leg
good
Driver Torso
good
Overall Side
good
Rear Passenger Head Protection
good
Rear Passenger Head and Neck
good
Rear Passenger Pelvis/Leg
good
Rear Passenger Torso
good
Structure/safety cage
good

Small Overlap Front - Driver Side

Chest
good
Head/Neck
good
Hip/Thigh
good
Lower Leg/Foot
good
Overall Evaluation
good
Restraints and Dummy Kinematics
good
Structure and Safety Cage
good

Small Overlap Front - Passenger Side

Overall Evaluation
good
Structure and Safety Cage
good

Small Overlap Front - Passenger Side - Driver Injury Measures

Chest
good
Head/Neck
good
Hip/Thigh
good
Lower Leg/Foot
good
Restraints and Dummy Kinematics
good

Small Overlap Front - Passenger Side - Passenger Injury Measures

Chest
good
Head/Neck
good
Hip/Thigh
good
Lower Leg/Foot
good
Restraints and Dummy Kinematics
good
Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) is a nonprofit research and communications organization funded by auto insurers.

Warranty

New car and certified pre-owned programs by Volkswagen

New Car Program Benefits

  • Bumper-to-Bumper

    72 months / 72,000 miles

  • Powertrain

    72 months / 72,000 miles

  • Roadside Assistance

    36 months / 36,000 miles

Certified Pre-Owned Program Benefits

  • Maximum Age/Mileage

    7 years/less than 72,000 or 75,000 miles (model-year specific)

  • Basic Warranty Terms

    Model-year 2017 and older, 2 years/24,000 miles; model-year 2018 and forward, 1 year/12,000 miles; TDI models, 2 years/unlimited miles

  • Powertrain

    5 years/60,000 miles

  • Dealer Certification Required

    100-plus point inspection

  • Roadside Assistance

    Yes

  • View All CPO Program Details

Latest 2019 Tiguan Stories

Change Year or Vehicle

0 Photos
0 / 0

Cars.com Car Seat Check

Certified child passenger safety technicians conduct hands-on tests of a car’s Latch system and check the vehicle’s ability to accommodate different types of car seats. The Tiguan received the following grades on a scale of A-F.*

Latch or Latch system

A

Infant seat

A

Forward-facing convertible

(second row)

A

Rear-facing convertible

A

Booster

(second row)

A
* This score may not apply to all trims, especially for vehicles with multiple body styles that affect the space and design of the seating.
For complete details,

Warranty FAQs

What is a Bumper-to-Bumper warranty?

Often called a basic warranty or new-vehicle warranty, a bumper-to-bumper policy covers components like air conditioning, audio systems, vehicle sensors, fuel systems and major electrical components. Most policies exclude regular maintenance like fluid top offs and oil changes, but a few brands have separate free-maintenance provisions, and those that do offer them is slowly rising. Bumper-to-bumper warranties typically expire faster than powertrain warranties.

What is a Powertrain warranty?

Don't be misled a 10-year or 100,000-mile powertrain warranty doesn't promise a decade of free repairs for your car. It typically covers just the engine and transmission, along with any other moving parts that lead to the wheels, like the driveshaft and constant velocity joints. Some automakers also bundle seat belts and airbags into their powertrain warranties. With a few exceptions, powertrain warranties don't cover regular maintenance like engine tuneups and tire rotations.

What is included in Roadside Assistance?

Some automakers include roadside assistance with their bumper-to-bumper or powertrain warranties, while others have separate policies. These programs cover anything from flat-tire changes and locksmith services to jump-starts and towing. Few reimburse incidental costs like motel rooms (if you have to wait for repairs).

What other services could be included in a warranty?

Some automakers include free scheduled maintenance for items such as oil changes, air filters and tire rotations. Some include consumables including brake pads and windshield wipers; others do not. They are typically for the first couple of years of ownership of a new car.

What does CPO mean?

A certified pre-owned or CPO car has been inspected to meet minimum quality standards and typically includes some type of warranty. While dealers and third parties certify cars, the gold standard is an automaker-certified vehicle that provides a factory-backed warranty, often extending the original coverage. Vehicles must be in excellent condition and have low miles and wear to be certified, which is why off-lease vehicles feed many CPO programs.

See also the latest CPO incentives by automaker

What's your location?

To find the best deals near you, please enter your ZIP code.

Get your new car price quote

Select the car you want

*MSRP and Invoice prices displayed are for educational purposes only, do not reflect the actual selling price of a particular vehicle, and do not include applicable gas taxes or destination charges.