• (4.7) 3 reviews
  • MSRP: $9,288–$17,964
  • Body Style: Coupe
  • Combined MPG: 21
  • Engine: 265-hp, 3.2-liter V-6 (premium)
  • Drivetrain: All-wheel Drive
2008 Audi A5

Our Take on the Latest Model 2008 Audi A5

What We Don't Like

  • Some confusing controls
  • Polarizing looks

Notable Features

  • All-new for 2008
  • 265-hp V-6

2008 Audi A5 Reviews

Vehicle Overview
Are coupes back in vogue? Audi would have you think so. The all-new A5 and its performance twin, the S5, are aimed straight for their fellow two-door heartthrobs: the BMW 3 Series coupe and Mercedes-Benz CLK-Class. Like its Deutschland competitors, the A5 seats four and draws power from a high-tech six-cylinder engine.

Manual-transmission A5s hit dealerships in November 2007; automatic-equipped versions will come four months later, Audi says. All-wheel drive is standard across the line.

The A5 shares components with the next A4, set to arrive in the next few years.


Exterior
The A5 is instantly recognizable as an Audi, with the brand's customary wide-mouth grille flanked by lower air intakes. With piercing, downward-slanting headlamps, the A5's nose has something of a furrowed brow. In back, the tail holds twin exhaust pipes, a dark lower bumper and horizontal taillamps reminiscent of the 3 Series coupe and countless Lexus models. Seventeen-inch wheels are standard.

At 182.3 inches long, the A5 falls just between the 3 Series coupe (181.1 inches) and the CLK (183.2).


Interior
The A5's dashboard looks much like that of Audi's larger A6. A broad dome overlaps the gauges and central information screen, which incorporates the optional navigation system. Dual-zone automatic climate control, leather seats and Audi's Multi-Media Interface are standard. The MMI system governs various functions — including the navigation system — with a central knob behind the gearshift. Thanks to more than a dozen shortcut buttons surrounding the knob, it's easier to use than BMW's similar iDrive, but uninitiated drivers may find it confusing.

Options include sportier seats, the navigation system and a 14-speaker surround sound stereo by Danish audiophiles Bang & Olufsen. The A5 has an extensive range of materials to choose from, including two-tone leather/Alcantara seats and aluminum, wood or piano-black dashboard trim.

The trunk holds a sedan-like 16.1 cubic feet of luggage, much more than the 3 Series coupe (11.1 cubic feet) or the CLK (10.4).


Under the Hood
Audi's 3.2-liter V-6 offers a few new performance tweaks, including variable valve lift control (similar to Honda's VTEC) and direct fuel injection to make 265 horsepower and 243 pounds-feet of torque.

Audi offers a choice of a six-speed manual or a six-speed automatic transmission in the A5. Unfortunately, Audi's expedient Direct Shift Gearbox, which can manage quicker shifts than most stick-shift drivers, is not available.

Quattro all-wheel drive is standard; in normal conditions, it channels 60 percent of the power to the rear wheels. With the manual transmission, Audi says the A5 can accelerate from zero to 60 mph in about 6 seconds, which is faster than most cars.


Safety
Six standard airbags include the required front ones, as well as side-impact airbags for the front seats and side curtain airbags for both rows. Four-wheel-disc antilock brakes, traction control and an electronic stability system are also standard.

Consumer Reviews

4.7

Average based on 3 reviews

Write a Review

Pretty Sweet!

by CoupeDude from LA, CA on June 11, 2010

The Audi A5, while hard to find, is a great car to buy pre-owned. It also was an excellent replacement for my 1998 Mercedes CLK320, a car that was neutered and smoothed over the years into a car for "... Read Full Review

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1 Trim Available

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Wondering which configuration is right for you?
Our 2008 Audi A5 trim comparison will help you decide.
 

Audi A5 Articles

2008 Audi A5 Safety Ratings

Crash-Test Reports

Recalls

There are currently 2 recalls for this car.


Safety defects and recalls are relatively common. Stay informed and know what to do ahead of time.

Safety defects and recalls explained

Service & Repair

Estimated Service & Repair cost: $4,100 per year.

Save on maintenance costs and do your own repairs.

Warranty Coverage

Bumper-to-Bumper

48mo/50,000mi

Powertrain

48mo/50,000mi

Roadside Assistance Coverage

48mo/unlimited

Free Scheduled Maintenance

12mo/5,000mi

What you should get in your warranty can be confusing. Make sure you are informed.

Learn More About Warranties

Warranties Explained

Bumper-to-Bumper

Often called a basic warranty or new-vehicle warranty, a bumper-to-bumper policy covers components like air conditioning, audio systems, vehicle sensors, fuel systems and major electrical components. Most policies exclude regular maintenance like fluid top offs and oil changes, but a few brands have separate free-maintenance provisions, and those that do offer them is slowly rising. Bumper-to-bumper warranties typically expire faster than powertrain warranties.

Powertrain

Don't be misled a 10-year or 100,000-mile powertrain warranty doesn't promise a decade of free repairs for your car. It typically covers just the engine and transmission, along with any other moving parts that lead to the wheels, like the driveshaft and constant velocity joints. Some automakers also bundle seat belts and airbags into their powertrain warranties. With a few exceptions, powertrain warranties don't cover regular maintenance like engine tuneups and tire rotations.

Roadside Assistance

Some automakers include roadside assistance with their bumper-to-bumper or powertrain warranties, while others have separate policies. These programs cover anything from flat-tire changes and locksmith services to jump-starts and towing. Few reimburse incidental costs like motel rooms (if you have to wait for repairs).

Free Scheduled Maintenance

Some automakers include free scheduled maintenance for items such as oil changes, air filters and tire rotations. Some include consumables including brake pads and windshield wipers; others do not. They are typically for the first couple of years of ownership of a new car.

Other Years