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2019 Acura NSX

2019 Acura NSX

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$130,357 — $163,589 USED
18
Photos
Coupe
2 Seats
21 MPG
(Combined)
Key specs of the base trim
 — 
Compare 1 trims

Overview

Is this the car for you?

The Good

  • Powertrain responsiveness
  • Different settings to control engine volume
  • Forward visibility
  • Advanced adaptive suspension
  • Electrified all-wheel drive
  • Seamlessness of multiple power sources

The Bad

  • Not a plug-in, no electric range
  • Steering feedback
  • Fuel economy
  • Generic multimedia system
  • No front cargo space
2019 Acura NSX exterior side view

What to Know

about the 2019 Acura NSX
  • Halo sports car
  • Mid-engine layout
  • Three electric motors
  • Hybrid gas-electric drivetrain makes 573 hp
  • All-wheel drive standard
  • Nine-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission

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2019 Acura NSX Review

from the Cars.com expert editorial team

A worthy successor to its predecessor, the 2019 Acura NSX arrives complete with a mid-engine design, all-wheel drive and a hybrid powertrain. Check out our video to see what it's like to get behind the wheel of a modern-day supercar.

By Brian Wong

The 2019 Acura NSX might carry the same name and mid-engine layout of its predecessor, but its rebirth has spawned something entirely different. This is not a reproduction of the past, but a peek into the electrified future, right here in the present. Instead of one engine in the middle, the NSX has that plus three electric motors: one attached to the engine and a pair up front, one for each wheel. What makes the NSX unique among supercars (yes, I think it is one) is how it uses this system to its advantage — and it’s got nothing to do with fuel economy.

Related: 2019 Acura NSX: Supercar Shoppers Get a Bit More for Their $160K

For 2019, the NSX returns with a few tweaks that change up its appearance slightly, along with some performance-minded updates, as well. There was one change in particular that I found to pay immediate dividends: the tires. The NSX now wears Continental SportContact 6 rubber at all four corners, replacing SportContact 5s from 2018. The new tire has a different tread design and tire compound, which not only provides more grip but also helps to control one of the problems of the previous year’s vehicle: snap oversteer.

The updated car, the new tire and a few suspension changes — including added stiffness to the front and rear stabilizer bars, and stiffer rear toe-link bushings — attempt to curb this, and I think the changes were successful. It didn’t try to snap on me a single time, and you could predictably dial in a bit of oversteer with the throttle. Th...

The 2019 Acura NSX might carry the same name and mid-engine layout of its predecessor, but its rebirth has spawned something entirely different. This is not a reproduction of the past, but a peek into the electrified future, right here in the present. Instead of one engine in the middle, the NSX has that plus three electric motors: one attached to the engine and a pair up front, one for each wheel. What makes the NSX unique among supercars (yes, I think it is one) is how it uses this system to its advantage — and it’s got nothing to do with fuel economy.

Related: 2019 Acura NSX: Supercar Shoppers Get a Bit More for Their $160K

For 2019, the NSX returns with a few tweaks that change up its appearance slightly, along with some performance-minded updates, as well. There was one change in particular that I found to pay immediate dividends: the tires. The NSX now wears Continental SportContact 6 rubber at all four corners, replacing SportContact 5s from 2018. The new tire has a different tread design and tire compound, which not only provides more grip but also helps to control one of the problems of the previous year’s vehicle: snap oversteer.

The updated car, the new tire and a few suspension changes — including added stiffness to the front and rear stabilizer bars, and stiffer rear toe-link bushings — attempt to curb this, and I think the changes were successful. It didn’t try to snap on me a single time, and you could predictably dial in a bit of oversteer with the throttle. The result is a superbly balanced car.

In my time with the NSX, I got to explore the car’s hybrid system in both everyday and performance settings. Here are three ways the NSX puts its hybrid system to good use:

1. In the Day-to-Day

The first thing I did after taking delivery of the NSX? Pick up a friend at the airport. There’s a wide swath of high-performance vehicles that are really good at going fast but pretty awful at going slow. The NSX avoids that distinction; it’s docile at low speeds and the suspension, while firm, doesn’t beat you up too badly.

The hybrid system helps with this. At low speeds, the engine cuts out and the car moves on electric power alone as long as you’re light with the throttle. In the car’s sportier drive settings, the engine stays on all the time, but if you just leave it in Quiet mode, it putts around like a normal hybrid most of the time — albeit one that seats you about a foot off the ground. The NSX is actually a pretty good day-to-day driver (minus the multimedia system) if you’re OK with getting stared at quite a bit because, even though the styling is a few years old, it still really stands out.

2. In the Bends

While the hybrid system does help with the car’s more mundane functions, its true purpose on the NSX is to enhance performance, and there are a few ways that it does this. The twin-turbo 3.5-liter V-6 makes 500 horsepower and 406 pounds-feet of torque, providing the bulk of the power (and it’s fantastic). But the hybrid system, with its electric-motor trio, is what makes the car feel truly unique.

The electric motor mounted next to the engine helps with charging the batteries and acceleration to the rear-wheels; it gives the NSX a pretty good kick at low rpm, which makes the car feel more responsive. Then the gas engine kicks in … and the world just kind of melts in front of you.

But what you notice more while cornering are the two motors found up front, which the car uses for an important task: torque vectoring. Using electric motors and the instant torque that they provide allows the car to precisely control how much power is going to each wheel, as well as when that power kicks in. The front motors each offer 36 horsepower and 54 pounds-feet of torque; total system output (including all of the motors and the engine) is capped at 573 hp and 476 pounds-feet of torque.

This level of dexterity gives the NSX a unique feel when cornering, different from other performance cars I’ve driven that also feature all-wheel drive (and different from other mid-engine cars, as well). As you push through a turn, it feels as though something is grabbing the outside of the front end and pulling it into the turn. What’s happening in real time is that the computers are reading the situation and deciding which front wheel has grip and needs power at that precise moment. Generally speaking, that’s more of the outside wheel than the inside one, as the car puts more weight down on that wheel while it turns.

This makes the car more forgiving and it also allows the driver to use the throttle some to aid steering. That adds more velocity to corner exits — and man, does this car love to add velocity.

3. In the Straights

In addition to the electronic wizardry in corners, the hybrid system also helps out with straight-line acceleration. Acceleration in the NSX feels instantaneous at a variety of speeds, from a stop to passing on the highway or trying to make a light: You push the pedal, and there zips the car. The transitions, as the car adds electric power to that of the engine, are perfectly seamless. Driving in Sport mode with the engine always on, you could be forgiven for forgetting that this is a hybrid. The NSX has serious speed.

The hybrid system also helps during launches. Launch control on the NSX is one of the easiest systems I’ve used. It’s basically a four-step process:

Step 1: Put the car in Track mode.
Step 2: Apply the brake.
Step 3: Mash the accelerator all the way down.
Step 4: Drop the brake.

If there’s a Step 5, it’s just watching the world explode in your face.

The system is easier on the drivetrain than other systems I’ve tested because, upon launch, the engine is only running at 2,200 rpm and the electric motors take care of the initial start of the vehicle’s momentum. For the first 0.15 second, the electric motors move the car entirely on their own, then the gas engine kicks in. The low-starting rpm and the electrical assist means you’re not putting a ton of stress on the gearbox or the clutches as the car snaps into gear. Acura quotes the zero-to-60-mph time as 2.9 seconds, which is absolutely insane — but after driving the car, I absolutely believe it.

The Price of Glory

The price you pay for all of this performance adds up almost as quickly. My test vehicle was $196,500 (including a destination charge) after a long list of added options, but what’s remarkable is that pretty much all of the options were not performance-focused and very cosmetic. The exception would be the carbon-ceramic brake rotors ($10,600), but other than that, if you opt for the base model, which starts at $159,300, you’ll be getting pretty much the exact same amount of performance and you don’t really need the carbon-ceramics unless you plan to really track the car hard.

I had an absolute blast in my few days with the 2019 Acura NSX. It not only offers high-performance potential (like most other sports cars in that price range), but it makes the experience accessible. The hybrid systems don’t just make the car faster, they make it safer, too. This is one of the easier cars out there to drive at high speeds because of its balance, grip and how it can put down power without causing drama.

Cars.com’s Editorial department is your source for automotive news and reviews. In line with Cars.com’s long-standing ethics policy, editors and reviewers don’t accept gifts or free trips from automakers. The Editorial department is independent of Cars.com’s advertising, sales and sponsored content departments.

Consumer Reviews

What drivers are saying

5
3 reviews — Read All reviews
Exterior Styling
(5.0)
Performance
(5.0)
Interior Design
(4.7)
Comfort
(5.0)
Reliability
(5.0)
Value For The Money
(5.0)
(5.0)

Best bargain supercar!

by Cesc-LRSD-Ranger from IRVINE on October 24, 2020

For the price, technology, comfort, reliability and warranty is the best supercar I've own! better than a 570s, Huracan, 458 period and Acura will actually honor their warranty no questions asked. In ... Read full review

(5.0)

Solid on the road; sounds awesome!gorgeous!

by J R from Houston TX on December 31, 2019

Quite possibly the best car i have ever owned in 40 years ,including bimmers, lambos, porsches, etc. Superb acceleration and super- comfortable despite super car performance. This is a seriously good ... Read full review

Safety

Recalls and crash tests

Recalls

The 2019 Acura NSX currently has 1 recall


Crash and Rollover Test Ratings

The 2019 Acura NSX has not been tested.

Warranty

New car and certified pre-owned programs by Acura

New Car Program Benefits

  • Bumper-to-Bumper

    48 months / 50,000 miles

  • Powertrain

    72 months / 70,000 miles

  • Roadside Assistance

    48 months / 50,000 miles

Certified Pre-Owned Program Benefits

  • Maximum Age/Mileage

    Six model years and less than 80,000 odometer miles

  • Basic Warranty Terms

    Precision Certified: 24 months or up to 100,000 miles

  • Powertrain

    7 years/100,000 miles

  • Dealer Certification Required

    182-point inspection

  • Roadside Assistance

    Yes

  • View All CPO Program Details

Latest 2019 NSX Stories

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Cars.com Car Seat Check

Certified child passenger safety technicians conduct hands-on tests of a car’s Latch system and check the vehicle’s ability to accommodate different types of car seats. The NSX received the following grades on a scale of A-F.*
* This score may not apply to all trims, especially for vehicles with multiple body styles that affect the space and design of the seating.

Warranty FAQs

What is a Bumper-to-Bumper warranty?

Often called a basic warranty or new-vehicle warranty, a bumper-to-bumper policy covers components like air conditioning, audio systems, vehicle sensors, fuel systems and major electrical components. Most policies exclude regular maintenance like fluid top offs and oil changes, but a few brands have separate free-maintenance provisions, and those that do offer them is slowly rising. Bumper-to-bumper warranties typically expire faster than powertrain warranties.

What is a Powertrain warranty?

Don't be misled a 10-year or 100,000-mile powertrain warranty doesn't promise a decade of free repairs for your car. It typically covers just the engine and transmission, along with any other moving parts that lead to the wheels, like the driveshaft and constant velocity joints. Some automakers also bundle seat belts and airbags into their powertrain warranties. With a few exceptions, powertrain warranties don't cover regular maintenance like engine tuneups and tire rotations.

What is included in Roadside Assistance?

Some automakers include roadside assistance with their bumper-to-bumper or powertrain warranties, while others have separate policies. These programs cover anything from flat-tire changes and locksmith services to jump-starts and towing. Few reimburse incidental costs like motel rooms (if you have to wait for repairs).

What other services could be included in a warranty?

Some automakers include free scheduled maintenance for items such as oil changes, air filters and tire rotations. Some include consumables including brake pads and windshield wipers; others do not. They are typically for the first couple of years of ownership of a new car.

What does CPO mean?

A certified pre-owned or CPO car has been inspected to meet minimum quality standards and typically includes some type of warranty. While dealers and third parties certify cars, the gold standard is an automaker-certified vehicle that provides a factory-backed warranty, often extending the original coverage. Vehicles must be in excellent condition and have low miles and wear to be certified, which is why off-lease vehicles feed many CPO programs.

See also the latest CPO incentives by automaker

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*MSRP and Invoice prices displayed are for educational purposes only, do not reflect the actual selling price of a particular vehicle, and do not include applicable gas taxes or destination charges.