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2013 Hyundai Elantra

$5,059 — $14,435 USED
Sedan
5 Seats
33 MPG
(Combined)
Key specs of the base trim
 — 
Compare 4 trims

Overview

Is this the car for you?

The Good

  • Ride and handling poise
  • Gas mileage doesn't come at the expense of drivability
  • Roomy cabin
  • Interior quality
  • Stylish design

The Bad

  • Telescoping wheel doesn't extend far enough for tall drivers
  • Driver-side A-pillar, rearview mirror limit visibility
  • Unconvincing faux-metal interior trim
  • Artificial steering feel (coupe)
  • Touchy gas pedal (coupe)
2013 Hyundai Elantra exterior side view

What to Know

about the 2013 Hyundai Elantra
  • Sedan, coupe or hatchback
  • Many new standard features on base GLS trim
  • Six-speed manual or automatic
  • 38 mpg on the highway
  • Available heated rear seats

Our Take

from the Cars.com expert editorial team

The Elantra coupe’s styling is more aggressive and sporty compared with the sedan, says Cars.com Editor Mike Hanley. 

by Mike Hanley -

Editor's note: Estimated mileage ratings have been lowered to reflect a Nov. 2012 EPA audit of this car's stated mileage.

The new 2013 Hyundai Elantra coupe provides the same fuel-efficient driving experience as its sedan counterpart, and it doesn't sacrifice much backseat comfort or cargo room.

The Elantra coupe is one of two new body styles joining the Hyundai Elantra lineup for the 2013 model year. The Elantra GT hatchback, based on a different, European platform, is the other. To see the body styles (two-door or five-door) compared, click here. The sedan is reviewed here.

The Elantra coupe starts at $18,220 including a $775 destination charge, but our uplevel SE test car's price came to $23,870 with optional features. Competitors in this price range include the Honda Civic coupe, Scion tC and Kia Forte Koup; click here for a comparison.

Design
Hyundai rocked the compact-car segment a few years ago with its redesigned Elantra sedan, which brought a big dose of style to the market. Hyundai calls the design language "Fluidic Sculpture," and it translates well to the coupe, which has a gracefully arcing roofline that trails off to a short deck lid. Hyundai took additional steps to make the coupe look different from the sedan, with angular fog lights and a piano-black bumper finish that gives an Audi-like impression.

Efficient Performance
The coupe accelerates well, readily keeping pace with fast-moving urban traffic. Power is similar to th...

by Mike Hanley -

Editor's note: Estimated mileage ratings have been lowered to reflect a Nov. 2012 EPA audit of this car's stated mileage.

The new 2013 Hyundai Elantra coupe provides the same fuel-efficient driving experience as its sedan counterpart, and it doesn't sacrifice much backseat comfort or cargo room.

The Elantra coupe is one of two new body styles joining the Hyundai Elantra lineup for the 2013 model year. The Elantra GT hatchback, based on a different, European platform, is the other. To see the body styles (two-door or five-door) compared, click here. The sedan is reviewed here.

The Elantra coupe starts at $18,220 including a $775 destination charge, but our uplevel SE test car's price came to $23,870 with optional features. Competitors in this price range include the Honda Civic coupe, Scion tC and Kia Forte Koup; click here for a comparison.

Design
Hyundai rocked the compact-car segment a few years ago with its redesigned Elantra sedan, which brought a big dose of style to the market. Hyundai calls the design language "Fluidic Sculpture," and it translates well to the coupe, which has a gracefully arcing roofline that trails off to a short deck lid. Hyundai took additional steps to make the coupe look different from the sedan, with angular fog lights and a piano-black bumper finish that gives an Audi-like impression.

Efficient Performance
The coupe accelerates well, readily keeping pace with fast-moving urban traffic. Power is similar to the Honda Civic. The gas pedal is sensitive, though, and it's harder than normal to hold it steady, though I adjusted to it over time. The refined four-cylinder engine is an Elantra coupe highlight.

The optional six-speed automatic (a six-speed manual is standard) shifts smoothly and is always willing to downshift when you need more power. Whether you press the gas pedal partway down or all the way to the floor, the transmission quickly drops a gear or more. A lot of modern automatics make you wait a moment before heeding your call, so it's nice to experience one like this.

With an EPA-estimated fuel economy of 27/37 mpg city/highway, the automatic-equipped Hyundai Elantra coupe is nearly as efficient as its sedan counterpart, which is rated 28/38 mpg (actual mileage may vary).

The automatic transmission includes an ActiveECO feature. The system is designed to smooth spikes in throttle application to improve real-world efficiency, Hyundai says. When ActiveECO is on, gas pedal sensitivity decreases, requiring you to press the pedal down farther when accelerating, but the drop-off in response doesn't significantly degrade the driving experience.

Ride & Handling
The SE trim level comes with a sport suspension that Hyundai says has been tuned to the car's 17-inch low-profile tires. You feel bumps and ruts, but true harshness is damped before it reaches the cabin. The Elantra stays flat in corners, but the ride is comfortable.

The car turns in quickly, giving it a nimble feel, and plenty of power-steering assist means it doesn't take much effort to turn the wheel. On the downside, there's little steering feedback, and what's present has an unrewarding artificialness to it.

The Inside
The coupe's cabin has the same design theme as the 
Hyundai Elantra sedan, with a distinctive control panel that ties the upper portion of the dashboard together with the center console. Despite the angular design, panel fit and alignment is impressive. The dashboard is made of soft-touch material, but Hyundai's money would have been better spent on the upper door trim — a place where you might want to rest your arm — which is still hard plastic.

Manually adjustable front bucket seats are standard. They aren't overly firm, and they're wide enough that you won't feel the side bolsters most of the time.

The amount of rear seat space is a pleasant surprise. From the outside, the coupe's backseat looks tiny and cramped, but it's actually quite roomy and comfortable — even for a 6-foot-1 passenger like me. Of course, it's not as easy to get into the backseat as it is in the Elantra sedan, but the coupe really doesn't give up much to the four-door in terms of comfort, and that's impressive.

The coupe doesn't lose any trunk space compared with the sedan, either, as both measure 14.8 cubic feet. The coupe's standard 60/40-split backseat folds to reveal a large opening between the trunk and passenger area, enhancing cargo-carrying versatility.

Safety
As a new model, the 
Hyundai Elantra coupe hasn't been crash-tested yet.

Standard safety features include antilock brakes and an electronic stability system, which are required on new vehicles as of the 2012 model year. Also standard are side-impact airbags for the front seats and side curtain airbags. A backup camera is optional.

For a full list of safety features, check out the Features & Specs page, and see how child-safety seats fit with our Car Seat Check.

Elantra Coupe in the Market
Mainstream compact coupes tend to stand in the shadows of their sedan siblings, and both Chevrolet and Ford recently dropped coupe body styles from their compact lineups following redesigns.

Despite U.S. car shoppers' supposed dislike of hatchbacks, the body style has instead gained ground in the compact segment, with new sporty-looking models like the Ford Focus hatch and Elantra GT. Versatility is one of the most appealing aspects of a hatchback, and the Hyundai Elantra coupe impressed on that front, too, by retaining the sedan's roominess. It represents another solid effort in a new segment for Hyundai.

Send Mike an email  

 

Consumer Reviews

What drivers are saying

4.4
264 reviews — Read All reviews
Exterior Styling
(4.7)
Performance
(4.2)
Interior Design
(4.5)
Comfort
(4.5)
Reliability
(4.5)
Value For The Money
(4.5)

Read reviews that mention:

(5.0)

Awesome Gas Mileage

by Heather from Maitland, FL on November 14, 2018

This car met all my Daughters need and she is very pleased with all the extra functions it has. Great on gas and smooth drive. She is so happy with her decision. Read full review

(5.0)

A great car

by HalPA from Tatamy, PA on November 4, 2018

This car was better than expected. Interior was well laid out, it looked sharp on the outside, fuel economy was excellent, and was fun to drive. Read full review

Safety

Recalls and crash tests

Recalls

The 2013 Hyundai Elantra currently has 3 recalls


Crash and Rollover Test Ratings

Based on 2013 Hyundai Elantra GLS

IIHS rates vehicles good, acceptable, marginal, or poor.

Head Restraints and Seats

Dynamic Rating
good
Overall Rear
good
Seat Head/Restraint Geometry
good

Moderate overlap front

Chest
good
Head/Neck
good
Left Leg/Foot
good
Overall Front
good
Restraints
good
Right Leg/Foot
good
Structure/safety cage
good

Other

Roof Strength
good

Side

Driver Head Protection
good
Driver Head and Neck
good
Driver Pelvis/Leg
good
Driver Torso
good
Overall Side
good
Rear Passenger Head Protection
good
Rear Passenger Head and Neck
good
Rear Passenger Pelvis/Leg
acceptable
Rear Passenger Torso
good
Structure/safety cage
good
Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) is a nonprofit research and communications organization funded by auto insurers.

Warranty

New car and certified pre-owned programs by Hyundai

New Car Program Benefits

  • Bumper-to-Bumper

    60 months / 60,000 miles

  • Powertrain

    120 months / 100,000 miles

  • Roadside Assistance

    60 months / unlimited distance

Certified Pre-Owned Program Benefits

  • Maximum Age/Mileage

    Newer than 5 model years/less than 60,000 miles

  • Basic Warranty Terms

    5 years/60,000 miles (from remainder of original)

  • Powertrain

    10 years/100,000 miles and 10 years/100,000 miles for hybrid/electric vechicle batteries.

  • Dealer Certification Required

    150-point inspection

  • Roadside Assistance

    Yes

  • View All CPO Program Details

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Cars.com Car Seat Check

Certified child passenger safety technicians conduct hands-on tests of a car’s Latch system and check the vehicle’s ability to accommodate different types of car seats. The Elantra received the following grades on a scale of A-F.*

Third-row access

N/A

Infant seat

A

Booster

(second row)

B

Booster

(third row)

N/A

Latch or Latch system

B

Forward-facing convertible

(third row)

N/A

Forward-facing convertible

(second row)

B

Rear-facing convertible

B
* This score may not apply to all trims, especially for vehicles with multiple body styles that affect the space and design of the seating.

Warranty FAQs

What is a Bumper-to-Bumper warranty?

Often called a basic warranty or new-vehicle warranty, a bumper-to-bumper policy covers components like air conditioning, audio systems, vehicle sensors, fuel systems and major electrical components. Most policies exclude regular maintenance like fluid top offs and oil changes, but a few brands have separate free-maintenance provisions, and those that do offer them is slowly rising. Bumper-to-bumper warranties typically expire faster than powertrain warranties.

What is a Powertrain warranty?

Don't be misled a 10-year or 100,000-mile powertrain warranty doesn't promise a decade of free repairs for your car. It typically covers just the engine and transmission, along with any other moving parts that lead to the wheels, like the driveshaft and constant velocity joints. Some automakers also bundle seat belts and airbags into their powertrain warranties. With a few exceptions, powertrain warranties don't cover regular maintenance like engine tuneups and tire rotations.

What is included in Roadside Assistance?

Some automakers include roadside assistance with their bumper-to-bumper or powertrain warranties, while others have separate policies. These programs cover anything from flat-tire changes and locksmith services to jump-starts and towing. Few reimburse incidental costs like motel rooms (if you have to wait for repairs).

What other services could be included in a warranty?

Some automakers include free scheduled maintenance for items such as oil changes, air filters and tire rotations. Some include consumables including brake pads and windshield wipers; others do not. They are typically for the first couple of years of ownership of a new car.

What does CPO mean?

A certified pre-owned or CPO car has been inspected to meet minimum quality standards and typically includes some type of warranty. While dealers and third parties certify cars, the gold standard is an automaker-certified vehicle that provides a factory-backed warranty, often extending the original coverage. Vehicles must be in excellent condition and have low miles and wear to be certified, which is why off-lease vehicles feed many CPO programs.

See also the latest CPO incentives by automaker

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