2005 Hyundai Santa Fe

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$1,848–$7,864 Inventory Prices
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Key Specs
Our Take
Overview
Photos
Reviews
Safety & Recalls
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Key Specs

of the 2005 Hyundai Santa Fe. Base trim shown.

Our Take

From the Cars.com Vehicle Test Team

The Good

  • Visibility
  • Handling
  • Ride quality
  • Passenger space
  • Quietness
  • Manageable dimensions

The Bad

  • Unproven reliability
  • Automatic-transmission behavior
  • Occasional sensation of top-heaviness

Notable Features of the 2005 Hyundai Santa Fe

  • Choice of two V-6s
  • FWD or AWD
  • Standard side-impact airbags
  • Stylish exterior
  • Bulging fenders

2005 Hyundai Santa Fe Overview

By Cars.com Editors
Vehicle Overview
Hyundai's compact sport utility vehicle returns for its fifth season on the U.S. market with a selection of refinements. Styling changes include a new grille and taillights, refined bodyside cladding, a redesigned tailgate handle and restyled 16-inch alloy wheels. A new instrument cluster goes inside, and the LX model adds a power driver's seat.

Based on the front-wheel-drive Sonata sedan's platform, the Santa Fe is offered in two trim levels: GLS and LX. Although the Santa Fe is roughly the same size as the Honda CR-V, Hyundai's SUV is wider. Front- and all-wheel-drive versions are available. The all-wheel-drive system provides extra traction on slippery surfaces rather than serious offroad capabilities.


Exterior
Built on a 103.1-inch wheelbase, the Santa Fe is 177.2 inches long overall and close to 66 inches tall. Bulging front fenders are one of the Santa Fe's distinguishing characteristics. The four-door SUV is equipped with a rear liftgate, and five-spoke alloy wheels hold 16-inch tires. A full-size spare tire is included.

Interior
Each Santa Fe holds up to five occupants with front bucket seats and a split three-place rear bench that folds for additional cargo space. Cargo volume behind the rear seat is 30.5 cubic feet, but capacity grows to 77.7 cubic feet when the backseat is folded down. Both models have a Monsoon six-speaker cassette/CD audio system, but the LX adds a six-CD changer. Leather seating surfaces and automatic climate ...
Vehicle Overview
Hyundai's compact sport utility vehicle returns for its fifth season on the U.S. market with a selection of refinements. Styling changes include a new grille and taillights, refined bodyside cladding, a redesigned tailgate handle and restyled 16-inch alloy wheels. A new instrument cluster goes inside, and the LX model adds a power driver's seat.

Based on the front-wheel-drive Sonata sedan's platform, the Santa Fe is offered in two trim levels: GLS and LX. Although the Santa Fe is roughly the same size as the Honda CR-V, Hyundai's SUV is wider. Front- and all-wheel-drive versions are available. The all-wheel-drive system provides extra traction on slippery surfaces rather than serious offroad capabilities.


Exterior
Built on a 103.1-inch wheelbase, the Santa Fe is 177.2 inches long overall and close to 66 inches tall. Bulging front fenders are one of the Santa Fe's distinguishing characteristics. The four-door SUV is equipped with a rear liftgate, and five-spoke alloy wheels hold 16-inch tires. A full-size spare tire is included.

Interior
Each Santa Fe holds up to five occupants with front bucket seats and a split three-place rear bench that folds for additional cargo space. Cargo volume behind the rear seat is 30.5 cubic feet, but capacity grows to 77.7 cubic feet when the backseat is folded down. Both models have a Monsoon six-speaker cassette/CD audio system, but the LX adds a six-CD changer. Leather seating surfaces and automatic climate control also are included in the top-of-the-line LX.

Under the Hood
The Santa Fe can be equipped with one of two V-6s. The GLS comes standard with a 2.7-liter V-6 that produces 170 horsepower and teams with a four-speed-automatic transmission. The 3.5-liter V-6, which is standard in the LX and optional in the GLS, generates 200 hp and 219 pounds-feet of torque and drives a five-speed automatic. Both transmissions have Shiftronic manual-shift capability.

Safety
Side-impact airbags and antilock brakes are standard in all Santa Fe models.

Driving Impressions
Ranking as one of the easiest small SUVs to drive, the Santa Fe handles adeptly and performs admirably. Its bulging fenders, which are uncommon on SUVs, actually make a difference in judging the vehicle's position. This SUV is appropriately spacious, and it runs quietly. You can also expect an appealing ride.

Though it is clearly stronger, the 3.5-liter V-6 doesn't boost performance quite as much as expected, and its automatic transmission may occasionally shift with a jerk. When driving through curves, the 3.5-liter Santa Fe can exhibit a slightly top-heavy sensation.



Latest 2005 Santa Fe Stories

Consumer Reviews

Exterior Styling
(3.8)
Performance
(3.7)
Interior Design
(3.8)
Comfort
(3.9)
Reliability
(4.1)
Value For The Money
(4.0)

What Drivers Are Saying

(5.0)

My favorite car

by hyundailover from El Segundo, CA on June 27, 2018

I bought the 2005 in 2009 with 10k miles on it. It has served me well. Very few mechanical issues, extremely comfortable to drive and VERY SAFE. I love this car. Read full review

(5.0)

Great, strong, reliable car

by James on June 8, 2018

This suv has been a pleasure to drive, has a roomy interior, powerful engine, and perfect for outdoor activities thanks to the hauling and towing capabilities. Read full review

Safety & Recalls

Recalls

The 2005 Hyundai Santa Fe currently has 3 recalls

Crash and Rollover Test Ratings

The 2005 Hyundai Santa Fe has not been tested.

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Cars.com Car Seat Check

Certified child passenger safety technicians conduct hands-on tests of a car’s Latch system and check the vehicle’s ability to accommodate different types of car seats. The Santa Fe received the following grades on a scale of A-F.*
* This score may not apply to all trims, especially for vehicles with multiple body styles that affect the space and design of the seating.

Warranty FAQs

What is a Bumper-to-Bumper warranty?

Often called a basic warranty or new-vehicle warranty, a bumper-to-bumper policy covers components like air conditioning, audio systems, vehicle sensors, fuel systems and major electrical components. Most policies exclude regular maintenance like fluid top offs and oil changes, but a few brands have separate free-maintenance provisions, and those that do offer them is slowly rising. Bumper-to-bumper warranties typically expire faster than powertrain warranties.

What is a Powertrain warranty?

Don't be misled a 10-year or 100,000-mile powertrain warranty doesn't promise a decade of free repairs for your car. It typically covers just the engine and transmission, along with any other moving parts that lead to the wheels, like the driveshaft and constant velocity joints. Some automakers also bundle seat belts and airbags into their powertrain warranties. With a few exceptions, powertrain warranties don't cover regular maintenance like engine tuneups and tire rotations.

What is included in Roadside Assistance?

Some automakers include roadside assistance with their bumper-to-bumper or powertrain warranties, while others have separate policies. These programs cover anything from flat-tire changes and locksmith services to jump-starts and towing. Few reimburse incidental costs like motel rooms (if you have to wait for repairs).

What other services could be included in a warranty?

Some automakers include free scheduled maintenance for items such as oil changes, air filters and tire rotations. Some include consumables including brake pads and windshield wipers; others do not. They are typically for the first couple of years of ownership of a new car.

What does CPO mean?

A certified pre-owned or CPO car has been inspected to meet minimum quality standards and typically includes some type of warranty. While dealers and third parties certify cars, the gold standard is an automaker-certified vehicle that provides a factory-backed warranty, often extending the original coverage. Vehicles must be in excellent condition and have low miles and wear to be certified, which is why off-lease vehicles feed many CPO programs.

See also the latest CPO incentives by automaker