2005 Lincoln Aviator

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Key Specs
Our Take
Overview
Photos
Reviews
Safety & Recalls
Warranty & CPO
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Key Specs

of the 2005 Lincoln Aviator. Base trim shown.

Our Take

From the Cars.com Vehicle Test Team

The Good

  • Interior space
  • Ride comfort
  • Easy to drive

The Bad

  • Price
  • Trucklike feel
  • Fuel economy

Notable Features of the 2005 Lincoln Aviator

  • 302-hp V-8
  • Three rows of seats
  • AdvanceTrac electronic stability system
  • Roll Stability Control
  • Side-curtain airbags

2005 Lincoln Aviator Overview

By Cars.com Editors
Vehicle Overview
After five years of offering a single sport utility vehicle, the full-size Navigator, Lincoln added a smaller SUV to its 2003-model-year lineup. Related to the midsize Ford Explorer and Mercury Mountaineer, the Aviator bears a distinct resemblance to the Navigator.

For 2005, the Aviator lineup has been simplified. Last year's Luxury series has gained the equipment previously restricted to the Ultimate series, which has been dropped. The grille has been modified, and new exterior colors and one new interior color are available.

All Aviators now come equipped with Ford's AdvanceTrac electronic stability system and Roll Stability Control. Seven-spoke, 17-inch aluminum wheels are now standard.

Other standard equipment includes a tire-pressure monitor and rear parking assist. Built with body-on-frame construction, the Aviator has a fully independent suspension and rack-and-pinion steering.


Exterior
The Aviator shares its basic styling with other Lincoln sedans and SUVs. It flaunts a large grille with new chrome surround and slots, flanked by large clear-lens headlights. Round fog lamps are built into the front bumper fascia.

Many chassis parts, including an extra-thick windshield, were specially fabricated to keep noise and vibration levels down. The Aviator has a two-piece liftgate with flip-up rear glass.

Built on a 113.7-inch wheelbase, the Aviator stretches 193.3 inches long overall and stands 71.9 inches tall. Integrated running boards are standard.


Inter...
Vehicle Overview
After five years of offering a single sport utility vehicle, the full-size Navigator, Lincoln added a smaller SUV to its 2003-model-year lineup. Related to the midsize Ford Explorer and Mercury Mountaineer, the Aviator bears a distinct resemblance to the Navigator.

For 2005, the Aviator lineup has been simplified. Last year's Luxury series has gained the equipment previously restricted to the Ultimate series, which has been dropped. The grille has been modified, and new exterior colors and one new interior color are available.

All Aviators now come equipped with Ford's AdvanceTrac electronic stability system and Roll Stability Control. Seven-spoke, 17-inch aluminum wheels are now standard.

Other standard equipment includes a tire-pressure monitor and rear parking assist. Built with body-on-frame construction, the Aviator has a fully independent suspension and rack-and-pinion steering.


Exterior
The Aviator shares its basic styling with other Lincoln sedans and SUVs. It flaunts a large grille with new chrome surround and slots, flanked by large clear-lens headlights. Round fog lamps are built into the front bumper fascia.

Many chassis parts, including an extra-thick windshield, were specially fabricated to keep noise and vibration levels down. The Aviator has a two-piece liftgate with flip-up rear glass.

Built on a 113.7-inch wheelbase, the Aviator stretches 193.3 inches long overall and stands 71.9 inches tall. Integrated running boards are standard.


Interior
Either a three-place bench or bucket seats may be installed in the second row. The Aviator carries seven people when it is equipped with the 40/20/40-split second-row bench seat; six occupants fit inside when twin bucket seats and a second-row center console are installed. The third-row seat folds flat into the floor. Cargo space totals 78.3 cubic feet with the second- and third-row seats folded.

An analog clock sits on the dashboard. Interior styling cues include the use of satin nickel finish, American burl walnut wood and premium leather upholstery.

All Aviators have power-adjustable brake and accelerator pedals. Standard equipment includes dual-zone climate control, power heated mirrors, power lumbar adjustment, a cassette/CD stereo and keyless entry. A DVD-based navigation system with an in-dash six-CD changer is included in Elite option packages.

A backseat DVD-based entertainment system, heated and cooled front seats, and an Audiophile six-CD changer are also optional.


Under the Hood
Lincoln's 4.6-liter V-8 generates 302 horsepower and 300 pounds-feet of torque; it drives a five-speed-automatic transmission. Towing capacity with all-wheel drive is 7,100 pounds. Aviators also are offered with rear-wheel drive.

Safety
In addition to all-disc antilock brakes, the Aviator features Ford's Safety Canopy, which deploys side curtain-type airbags during rollovers and side-impact collisions. The AdvanceTrac system includes Roll Stability Control.

Latest 2005 Aviator Stories

Consumer Reviews

Exterior Styling
(4.8)
Performance
(5.0)
Interior Design
(4.9)
Comfort
(4.8)
Reliability
(4.9)
Value For The Money
(4.7)

What Drivers Are Saying

(5.0)

Great car

by Larry Up North on August 24, 2018

Exactly what I needed and will serve me well for many years to come. Love it and it is very clean. Looked for a long time to find the right car. Read full review

(4.0)

This is a great vehicle for the price.

by Levi king from Lancaster pa on April 16, 2018

This vehicle is a really nice an smooth riding vehicle. Good visibility and really nice looking the color hit home for me and my girlfriend, we love it. Read full review

Safety & Recalls

Recalls

The 2005 Lincoln Aviator currently has 0 recalls

Crash and Rollover Test Ratings

The 2005 Lincoln Aviator has not been tested.

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Cars.com Car Seat Check

Certified child passenger safety technicians conduct hands-on tests of a car’s Latch system and check the vehicle’s ability to accommodate different types of car seats. The Aviator received the following grades on a scale of A-F.*
* This score may not apply to all trims, especially for vehicles with multiple body styles that affect the space and design of the seating.

Warranty FAQs

What is a Bumper-to-Bumper warranty?

Often called a basic warranty or new-vehicle warranty, a bumper-to-bumper policy covers components like air conditioning, audio systems, vehicle sensors, fuel systems and major electrical components. Most policies exclude regular maintenance like fluid top offs and oil changes, but a few brands have separate free-maintenance provisions, and those that do offer them is slowly rising. Bumper-to-bumper warranties typically expire faster than powertrain warranties.

What is a Powertrain warranty?

Don't be misled a 10-year or 100,000-mile powertrain warranty doesn't promise a decade of free repairs for your car. It typically covers just the engine and transmission, along with any other moving parts that lead to the wheels, like the driveshaft and constant velocity joints. Some automakers also bundle seat belts and airbags into their powertrain warranties. With a few exceptions, powertrain warranties don't cover regular maintenance like engine tuneups and tire rotations.

What is included in Roadside Assistance?

Some automakers include roadside assistance with their bumper-to-bumper or powertrain warranties, while others have separate policies. These programs cover anything from flat-tire changes and locksmith services to jump-starts and towing. Few reimburse incidental costs like motel rooms (if you have to wait for repairs).

What other services could be included in a warranty?

Some automakers include free scheduled maintenance for items such as oil changes, air filters and tire rotations. Some include consumables including brake pads and windshield wipers; others do not. They are typically for the first couple of years of ownership of a new car.

What does CPO mean?

A certified pre-owned or CPO car has been inspected to meet minimum quality standards and typically includes some type of warranty. While dealers and third parties certify cars, the gold standard is an automaker-certified vehicle that provides a factory-backed warranty, often extending the original coverage. Vehicles must be in excellent condition and have low miles and wear to be certified, which is why off-lease vehicles feed many CPO programs.

See also the latest CPO incentives by automaker