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2001 Chevrolet Monte Carlo

$488 — $7,716 USED
Coupe
5 Seats
25-26 MPG
(Combined)
Key specs of the base trim
 — 
Compare 2 trims

Our Take

from the Cars.com expert editorial team

Vehicle Overview
The Monte Carlo was redesigned for the 2000 model year, gaining new two-door coupe styling and growing from midsize to full-size proportions. It carries over for 2001 with minor changes.

The Monte Carlo shares its front-drive platform and V-6 engines with the Impala sedan but wears more adventurous styling in the coupe tradition. The Monte Carlo’s styling serves as the basis for Chevrolet’s entrant in NASCAR stock-car racing, though mechanically the stock car has nothing in common with the production version.



Exterior
Though it uses the same front-drive platform as the Chevy Impala, the Monte Carlo has a unique appearance, including a longer, sloping hood, different headlamps and grille, and character lines etched into the front fenders and rear side panels. The vertical taillamps recall those on the original Monte Carlo of 30 years ago, as does the script lettering for the Monte Carlo badges.

Both the LS and SS models ride on 16-inch wheels and tires, but the SS comes with standard cast-aluminum wheels, a firmer suspension, fog lamps and a rear spoiler.



Interior
Both models come with front bucket seats and five-passenger capacity. The roomy Monte Carlo is wide enough to hold three passengers in the rear seat, though the seat is shaped for two. Both models have a standard split, rear seatback that folds to supplement the 15.8-cubic-foot trunk.

The Monte Carlo’s dashboard is the same as the Impala’s, and all major controls are large, handy and wel...
Vehicle Overview
The Monte Carlo was redesigned for the 2000 model year, gaining new two-door coupe styling and growing from midsize to full-size proportions. It carries over for 2001 with minor changes.

The Monte Carlo shares its front-drive platform and V-6 engines with the Impala sedan but wears more adventurous styling in the coupe tradition. The Monte Carlo’s styling serves as the basis for Chevrolet’s entrant in NASCAR stock-car racing, though mechanically the stock car has nothing in common with the production version.



Exterior
Though it uses the same front-drive platform as the Chevy Impala, the Monte Carlo has a unique appearance, including a longer, sloping hood, different headlamps and grille, and character lines etched into the front fenders and rear side panels. The vertical taillamps recall those on the original Monte Carlo of 30 years ago, as does the script lettering for the Monte Carlo badges.

Both the LS and SS models ride on 16-inch wheels and tires, but the SS comes with standard cast-aluminum wheels, a firmer suspension, fog lamps and a rear spoiler.



Interior
Both models come with front bucket seats and five-passenger capacity. The roomy Monte Carlo is wide enough to hold three passengers in the rear seat, though the seat is shaped for two. Both models have a standard split, rear seatback that folds to supplement the 15.8-cubic-foot trunk.

The Monte Carlo’s dashboard is the same as the Impala’s, and all major controls are large, handy and well lit. The interior, however, has an abundance of lightweight, cheap-feeling plastic.



Under the Hood
LS models come with a 3.4-liter V-6 engine that generates 180 horsepower, and the SS versions use a 3.8-liter V-6 with 200 hp — the same engines as the Impala. Both engines team with a four-speed automatic transmission. Traction control is standard on the SS and not available on the LS.



Driving Impressions
The Monte Carlo drives much like the similar Impala because the two are so close mechanically. Besides the styling, the biggest difference between the two may be the doors. The Monte Carlo’s doors are much bigger and heavier than the front doors on the Impala, and they require a lot of room to fully open; this makes getting in and out awkward in tight parking spots.

 
Reported by Rick Popely  for cars.com
From the cars.com 2001 Buying Guide

Consumer Reviews

What drivers are saying

4.6
17 reviews — Read All reviews
Exterior Styling
(4.5)
Performance
(4.4)
Interior Design
(4.2)
Comfort
(4.6)
Reliability
(4.4)
Value For The Money
(4.7)

Read reviews that mention:

(5.0)

Best car I've ever owned!

by Linus from Umatilla on November 12, 2018

I ordered my 2001 Monte Carlo SS from the factory and it was delivered Aug. 2000. It currently has 84,352 miles on it, 11/12/2018 and still runs like a top. Minimum maintenance in the 18 years I've ... Read full review

(4.0)

One of the best vehicles Chevrolet has ever made.

by Javaman from phoenix, Az on December 2, 2017

This vehicle is a rare gem. Chevrolet stopped making Monte Carlo's ten years ago. This vehicle is in great condition. For those who follow or followed NASCAR, the Monte Carlo is and will always be a ... Read full review

Safety

Recalls and crash tests

Recalls

The 2001 Chevrolet Monte Carlo currently has 8 recalls


Crash and Rollover Test Ratings

The 2001 Chevrolet Monte Carlo has not been tested.

Latest 2001 Monte Carlo Stories

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Cars.com Car Seat Check

Certified child passenger safety technicians conduct hands-on tests of a car’s Latch system and check the vehicle’s ability to accommodate different types of car seats. The Monte Carlo received the following grades on a scale of A-F.*
* This score may not apply to all trims, especially for vehicles with multiple body styles that affect the space and design of the seating.

Warranty FAQs

What is a Bumper-to-Bumper warranty?

Often called a basic warranty or new-vehicle warranty, a bumper-to-bumper policy covers components like air conditioning, audio systems, vehicle sensors, fuel systems and major electrical components. Most policies exclude regular maintenance like fluid top offs and oil changes, but a few brands have separate free-maintenance provisions, and those that do offer them is slowly rising. Bumper-to-bumper warranties typically expire faster than powertrain warranties.

What is a Powertrain warranty?

Don't be misled a 10-year or 100,000-mile powertrain warranty doesn't promise a decade of free repairs for your car. It typically covers just the engine and transmission, along with any other moving parts that lead to the wheels, like the driveshaft and constant velocity joints. Some automakers also bundle seat belts and airbags into their powertrain warranties. With a few exceptions, powertrain warranties don't cover regular maintenance like engine tuneups and tire rotations.

What is included in Roadside Assistance?

Some automakers include roadside assistance with their bumper-to-bumper or powertrain warranties, while others have separate policies. These programs cover anything from flat-tire changes and locksmith services to jump-starts and towing. Few reimburse incidental costs like motel rooms (if you have to wait for repairs).

What other services could be included in a warranty?

Some automakers include free scheduled maintenance for items such as oil changes, air filters and tire rotations. Some include consumables including brake pads and windshield wipers; others do not. They are typically for the first couple of years of ownership of a new car.

What does CPO mean?

A certified pre-owned or CPO car has been inspected to meet minimum quality standards and typically includes some type of warranty. While dealers and third parties certify cars, the gold standard is an automaker-certified vehicle that provides a factory-backed warranty, often extending the original coverage. Vehicles must be in excellent condition and have low miles and wear to be certified, which is why off-lease vehicles feed many CPO programs.

See also the latest CPO incentives by automaker