2010 Honda Fit

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Key Specs
Our Take
Road Test
Photos
Reviews
Safety & Recalls
Warranty & CPO
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Key Specs

of the 2010 Honda Fit. Base trim shown.

  • Body Type:
  • Combined MPG:
    30 Combined MPG
  • Engine:
    117-hp, 1.5-liter I-4 (regular gas)
  • Drivetrain:
    Front-wheel Drive
  • Transmission:
    5-speed manual w/OD
  • View more specs

Our Take

From the Cars.com Vehicle Test Team

The Good

  • Optional stability system
  • Standard antilock brakes
  • Standard side-impact and side curtain airbags
  • Versatile folding backseat
  • Fuel economy

The Bad

  • Drum rear brakes
  • Only offered in hatchback form

Notable Features of the 2010 Honda Fit

  • Aggressive styling
  • 1.5-liter four-cylinder
  • Manual or automatic
  • Paddle shifters (automatic)
  • USB input for MP3 players and flash drives

2010 Honda Fit Road Test

Joe Bruzek

Honda's Fit does something not a lot of small cars can do: It acts like a larger car than its subcompact exterior suggests.

The enviable cargo and passenger space makes this hatchback a replacement for bigger sedans. Compared with its subcompact competitors, the Fit has a healthy dose of personality; on top of being able to haul a lot of goods, it's also fun to drive.

The fun factor may not appeal to everyone, as some of the characteristics that make the Fit sporty also mean it's not always pleasant to deal with. Its fuel economy rating, though — as high as 28/35 mpg city/highway — should appeal to anyone.

The Fit is available in two trim levels, base and Sport, which you can compare here. I tested an uplevel Fit Sport with the optional navigation system and electronic stability control. For a look at what's changed on the current generation — the Fit was redesigned for 2009 — see our review of the changes here.

Interior & Cargo Space

One of the reasons the Fit is so versatile and spacious is its hatchback body style. It offers the same passenger volume as a Civic sedan — 91 cubic feet — but with significantly more maximum cargo room once the rear seat is folded down.

With 20.6 cubic feet of cargo space behind the second row, we easily fit a tall suitcase inside, standing up with room to spare. That's a lot of space with the backseat in place compared with the Scion xD's 10.5 cubic feet, the Nissan Cube&apo...

Honda's Fit does something not a lot of small cars can do: It acts like a larger car than its subcompact exterior suggests.

The enviable cargo and passenger space makes this hatchback a replacement for bigger sedans. Compared with its subcompact competitors, the Fit has a healthy dose of personality; on top of being able to haul a lot of goods, it's also fun to drive.

The fun factor may not appeal to everyone, as some of the characteristics that make the Fit sporty also mean it's not always pleasant to deal with. Its fuel economy rating, though — as high as 28/35 mpg city/highway — should appeal to anyone.

The Fit is available in two trim levels, base and Sport, which you can compare here. I tested an uplevel Fit Sport with the optional navigation system and electronic stability control. For a look at what's changed on the current generation — the Fit was redesigned for 2009 — see our review of the changes here.

Interior & Cargo Space

One of the reasons the Fit is so versatile and spacious is its hatchback body style. It offers the same passenger volume as a Civic sedan — 91 cubic feet — but with significantly more maximum cargo room once the rear seat is folded down.

With 20.6 cubic feet of cargo space behind the second row, we easily fit a tall suitcase inside, standing up with room to spare. That's a lot of space with the backseat in place compared with the Scion xD's 10.5 cubic feet, the Nissan Cube's 11.4 cubic feet and the Fit's newest competitor, the Ford Fiesta and its 15.4 cubic feet. We also stashed two golf bags in the cargo area without folding any seats down and still had room for two more to stack on top.

Not only does the rear seat fold down, creating a flat load floor, but the cushions actually fold up, too. When the cushions are in their upright position, there's room from the lowest section of the floor to the top of the ceiling, allowing you to stash tall objects.

Utility is great, but that's not all the Fit offers on the inside. Its interior is built with high-quality materials that have the fit and finish of a more expensive car. Nissan's Versa has generous room like the Fit, but it lacks the quality feeling. I didn't find the Fit's quality flawless, though: The flimsy climate controls didn't feel up to par with the rest of the interior.

Ride & Handling

The Fit is one of the sportier options in the segment. Throw it into a corner, and the Fit stays planted and level. It seems to ask to be thrown into the next corner even more aggressively. Conversely, the ride can be harsh over rough roads, producing jarring hits on potholes and highway expansion joints. I tried my best to avoid anything that would unsettle the car at highway speeds, which basically included anything larger than a quarter.

Also at highway speeds, the Fit felt uneasy in the high winds of a storm I drove through. It wandered back and forth on the road, thrown around by the wind.

Off the highway, the Fit handled suburbia and city driving well thanks to its maneuverability and how easy it is to park.

If you test-drive a Fit Sport and find its ride quality poor, be on the lookout for a non-Sport model, which may have a more forgiving ride. The base Fit gets 15-inch wheels and tires with taller sidewalls than the Sport's low-profile 16s. Downgrading to the base, however, means you lose cruise control and the electronic stability system.

The Little Engine That Tries Really, Really Hard

The 117-horsepower, 1.5-liter four-cylinder does an OK job moving the Fit. It's a noisy, rev-happy engine that feels appropriate for a sporty little car. If you're afraid to put the pedal to the floor, though, the Fit may feel underpowered. I frequently had to bury the pedal to pass or merge on the highway.

While cruising at highway speeds, the Fit didn't like to maintain a steady pace; I had to play with the throttle to keep up with traffic. Other Cars.com editors noticed this inconvenience as well. The problem is easily avoidable using the Sport's standard cruise control, but base models don't offer it.

If you need a small car to travel long distances on highways, you'll want to check out the 2011 Fiesta, which feels more comfortable there. Not only does it track better, the Fiesta also seems to let less road and wind noise inside.

Though all Fits use the same engine, gas mileage varies by transmission and trim level. The Sport model we tested with an automatic transmission is rated 27/33 mpg city/highway. In a Cars.com mileage challenge in which we pit the Fit against the xD, Cube and Fiesta, the Fit returned an overall average of 33.48 mpg during a day of mostly highway driving. For complete results, see here.

Features & Options

The Fit starts at $14,900. It comes with numerous standard features, including air conditioning, power windows, a tilt/telescoping steering wheel, power door locks, and a trip computer with a mileage indicator. The Versa hatchback starts at $13,400, which makes the Fit seem expensive, but other hatches with similar standard equipment, like the Fiesta and xD, start at $15,120 and $15,045, respectively.

The Sport model, which starts at $16,410, adds 16-inch wheels, cruise control, paddle shifters for the automatic transmission and a security system. There aren't many individual options, just another trim level dubbed Fit Sport with Navigation that adds a navigation system with USB iPod integration for $18,260 with standard manual transmission.

Even in its highest trim level, the Fit's windshield wipers have so few intervals that driving in the rain was an annoyance. It's fine for downpours or drizzle, but anything in between left me wanting more choices.

Safety

The Fit has numerous standard safety features, but one missing piece is a standard electronic stability system. To get stability control, buyers have to choose the Fit Sport with Navigation.  The Fiesta and xD make stability control standard even on their least-expensive trim levels.

Tying a safety feature to a convenience option seems unnecessary. For a list of standard safety equipment, see here.

Fit in the Market

It seems hatchbacks have grown more popular in recent years. I specifically like hatchbacks because, their looks aside, they're able to fit 10 pounds of stuff into a five-pound package. The Fit is one of the best at that.

The Fiesta is hot on its heels with climbing sales, and rightfully so. Like the Fit, it's an excellent overall package. Shoppers should consider these two small hatchbacks the cream of the crop. Choose the Fit Sport for its spacious passenger and cargo room, but look elsewhere if you need a comfortable, quiet ride.

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2010 Fit Video

Cars.com's Joe Bruzek takes a look at the 2010 Honda Fit. It competes with the Scion xD and Toyota Yaris.

Latest 2010 Fit Stories

Consumer Reviews

Exterior Styling
(4.3)
Performance
(4.3)
Interior Design
(4.4)
Comfort
(4.2)
Reliability
(4.8)
Value For The Money
(4.7)

What Drivers Are Saying

(4.0)

Great first car

by Pooka from Portland on August 15, 2018

It is a fun to drive, zippy car. Plenty of space inside, and great visibility. I taught my daughter to drive on this car, and it was perfect for the task. Great gas mileage? as well. Read full review

(5.0)

I called it my mini-minivan

by Rocky from New Brunswick, NJ on July 17, 2018

The interior is huge, and with the rear seats folding down OR up, I put everything from 30 cubic feet of mulch to my 10-speed in there. Read full review

Safety & Recalls

Recalls

The 2010 Honda Fit currently has 7 recalls

IIHS Crash and Rollover Test Ratings

Based on 2010 Honda Fit Base

IIHS rates vehicles good, acceptable, marginal, or poor.

Head Restraints and Seats

Dynamic Rating
good
Overall Rear
good
Seat Head/Restraint Geometry
good

Moderate overlap front

Chest
good
Head/Neck
good
Left Leg/Foot
good
Overall Front
good
Restraints
good
Right Leg/Foot
good
Structure/safety cage
good

Other

Roof Strength
acceptable

Side

Driver Head Protection
good
Driver Head and Neck
good
Driver Pelvis/Leg
acceptable
Driver Torso
good
Overall Side
good
Rear Passenger Head Protection
good
Rear Passenger Head and Neck
good
Rear Passenger Pelvis/Leg
good
Rear Passenger Torso
good
Structure/safety cage
acceptable
Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) is a nonprofit research and communications organization funded by auto insurers.

Manufacturer Warranties

Backed by Honda
New Car Program Benefits
  • Bumper-to-Bumper

    36 months / 36,000 miles

  • Powertrain

    60 months / 60,000 miles

Certified Pre-Owned Program Benefits
  • Maximum Age/Mileage

    Less than 6 years old/less than 80,000 miles

  • Basic Warranty Terms

    12 months/12,000 miles

  • Powertrain warranty

    7 years/100,000 miles

  • Dealer Certification Required

    182-point inspection

  • Roadside Assistance

    Yes

  • View All Program Details

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Cars.com Car Seat Check

Certified child passenger safety technicians conduct hands-on tests of a car’s Latch system and check the vehicle’s ability to accommodate different types of car seats. The Fit received the following grades on a scale of A-F.*
* This score may not apply to all trims, especially for vehicles with multiple body styles that affect the space and design of the seating.

Warranty FAQs

What is a Bumper-to-Bumper warranty?

Often called a basic warranty or new-vehicle warranty, a bumper-to-bumper policy covers components like air conditioning, audio systems, vehicle sensors, fuel systems and major electrical components. Most policies exclude regular maintenance like fluid top offs and oil changes, but a few brands have separate free-maintenance provisions, and those that do offer them is slowly rising. Bumper-to-bumper warranties typically expire faster than powertrain warranties.

What is a Powertrain warranty?

Don't be misled a 10-year or 100,000-mile powertrain warranty doesn't promise a decade of free repairs for your car. It typically covers just the engine and transmission, along with any other moving parts that lead to the wheels, like the driveshaft and constant velocity joints. Some automakers also bundle seat belts and airbags into their powertrain warranties. With a few exceptions, powertrain warranties don't cover regular maintenance like engine tuneups and tire rotations.

What is included in Roadside Assistance?

Some automakers include roadside assistance with their bumper-to-bumper or powertrain warranties, while others have separate policies. These programs cover anything from flat-tire changes and locksmith services to jump-starts and towing. Few reimburse incidental costs like motel rooms (if you have to wait for repairs).

What other services could be included in a warranty?

Some automakers include free scheduled maintenance for items such as oil changes, air filters and tire rotations. Some include consumables including brake pads and windshield wipers; others do not. They are typically for the first couple of years of ownership of a new car.

What does CPO mean?

A certified pre-owned or CPO car has been inspected to meet minimum quality standards and typically includes some type of warranty. While dealers and third parties certify cars, the gold standard is an automaker-certified vehicle that provides a factory-backed warranty, often extending the original coverage. Vehicles must be in excellent condition and have low miles and wear to be certified, which is why off-lease vehicles feed many CPO programs.

See also the latest CPO incentives by automaker