• (4.7) 29 reviews
  • MSRP: $11,157–$25,105
  • Body Style: Sport Utility
  • Combined MPG: 16-17
  • Engine: 210-hp, 4.0-liter V-6 (regular gas)
  • Drivetrain: 4x2
  • Seats: 5
2010 Ford Explorer Sport Trac

Our Take on the Latest Model 2010 Ford Explorer Sport Trac

What We Don't Like

  • Heavy
  • No bare-bones model to lower price
  • High liftover height in cargo bed

Notable Features

  • Standard trailer-sway control
  • Voice-activated navigation system available
  • Available Sirius Travel Link

2010 Ford Explorer Sport Trac Reviews

Vehicle Overview
The Explorer Sport Trac has a pickup bed in back where most SUVs would have an enclosed cargo area. The Explorer Sport Trac seats five and is available in XLT and Limited trim levels. Its competitors include crew cab pickups such as the Honda Ridgeline, Dodge Dakota quad cab and Nissan Frontier crew cab.

The Explorer Sport Trac adapts an independent rear suspension from the Explorer— a setup that usually trades off-road capability for on-road handling ability — that's only matched by the Ridgeline.


New for 2010
There are no significant changes for 2010.

Exterior
The Explorer Sport Trac wears the same slatted grille and scalloped headlights as the Explorer, but adds nearly 17 inches in length to accommodate a 4.5-foot pickup bed replete with side rails, tie-down hooks, a composite liner and three in-floor storage containers.

  • Available 16-, 17-, 18- or 20-inch alloy wheels
  • Standard power mirrors
  • Standard power-sliding rear window
  • Optional keypad entry
  • Optional heated mirrors
  • Optional automatic headlamps
  • Optional moonroof


Interior
Dashboard components mimic the Explorer: A tall center stack has radio controls above the air vents and connects to a floor-mounted console box below. Front bucket seats and a second-row bench provide seating for up to five.
  • Standard air conditioning
  • Standard leather-wrapped steering wheel with audio and cruise controls
  • Standard power windows and locks
  • Optional Sync system
  • Optional voice-activated navigation system


Under the Hood
Like the Ridgeline, the Explorer Sport Trac has an independent rear suspension, which is rare for a truck. When properly equipped, the rear-wheel-drive V-8-powered Explorer Sport Trac can tow up to 7,160 pounds.
  • 210-horsepower, 4.0-liter V-6 with 254 pounds-feet of torque
  • 292-hp, 4.6-liter V-8 with 315 pounds-feet of torque
  • Five- (V-6) or six-speed automatic (V-8)
  • Available 4x2 and 4x4 driveline options for both engines


Safety
Standard trailer-sway control works with the stability system to either apply the brakes or adjust engine response to help keep the trailer in line. Other safety features include:
  • Standard front side-impact airbags
  • Standard side curtain airbags
  • Standard electronic stability control
  • Standard four-wheel-disc antilock brakes
  • Optional reverse sensing system
  • Optional power-adjustable pedals


Consumer Reviews

4.7

Average based on 29 reviews

Write a Review

Dependablility on the road

by MikeMC from Kenosha,WI on November 10, 2017

Fits needs for those who need truck that is car-comfortable,great in good weather and especially good bad weather. Perfect for pickup truck needs.

Read All Consumer Reviews

5 Trims Available

Photo of undefined
Wondering which configuration is right for you?
Our 2010 Ford Explorer Sport Trac trim comparison will help you decide.
 

Ford Explorer Sport Trac Articles

2010 Ford Explorer Sport Trac Safety Ratings

Crash-Test Reports

IIHS Ratings

Based on Ford Explorer Sport Trac Limited

Head Restraints and Seats
A
Moderate overlap front
G

IIHS Ratings

Based on Ford Explorer Sport Trac Limited

G Good
A Acceptable
M Marginal
P Poor

Head Restraints and Seats

Dynamic Rating
A
Overall Rear
A
Seat Head/Restraint Geometry
G

Moderate overlap front

Chest
G
Head/Neck
G
Left Leg/Foot
G
Overall Front
G
Restraints
P
Right Leg/Foot
G
Structure/safety cage
G
Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) is a nonprofit research and communications organization funded by auto insurers. IIHS rates vehicles good, acceptable, marginal or poor based on performance in high-speed front and side crash tests. IIHS also evaluates seat/head restraints for protection against neck injuries in rear impacts.

NHTSA Ratings

Based on Ford Explorer Sport Trac Limited

Overall Rollover Rating

NHTSA Ratings

Based on Ford Explorer Sport Trac Limited

Overall Rollover Rating
Driver's
Passenger's
Front Seat
Rear Seat
Side Barrier Rating Driver
Side Barrier Rating Passenger Rear Seat
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is part of the U.S. Department of Transportation. NHTSA provides vehicle safety information such as front- and side-crash ratings and rollover ratings. Vehicles are rated using a star rating system from 1-5 stars, with 5 being the highest.

Recalls

There is currently 1 recall for this car.


Safety defects and recalls are relatively common. Stay informed and know what to do ahead of time.

Safety defects and recalls explained

Service & Repair

Estimated Service & Repair cost: $3,900 per year.

Save on maintenance costs and do your own repairs.

Warranty Coverage

Bumper-to-Bumper

36mo/36,000mi

Powertrain

60mo/60,000mi

Roadside Assistance Coverage

60mo/60,000mi

What you should get in your warranty can be confusing. Make sure you are informed.

Learn More About Warranties

Warranties Explained

Bumper-to-Bumper

Often called a basic warranty or new-vehicle warranty, a bumper-to-bumper policy covers components like air conditioning, audio systems, vehicle sensors, fuel systems and major electrical components. Most policies exclude regular maintenance like fluid top offs and oil changes, but a few brands have separate free-maintenance provisions, and those that do offer them is slowly rising. Bumper-to-bumper warranties typically expire faster than powertrain warranties.

Powertrain

Don't be misled a 10-year or 100,000-mile powertrain warranty doesn't promise a decade of free repairs for your car. It typically covers just the engine and transmission, along with any other moving parts that lead to the wheels, like the driveshaft and constant velocity joints. Some automakers also bundle seat belts and airbags into their powertrain warranties. With a few exceptions, powertrain warranties don't cover regular maintenance like engine tuneups and tire rotations.

Roadside Assistance

Some automakers include roadside assistance with their bumper-to-bumper or powertrain warranties, while others have separate policies. These programs cover anything from flat-tire changes and locksmith services to jump-starts and towing. Few reimburse incidental costs like motel rooms (if you have to wait for repairs).

Free Scheduled Maintenance

Some automakers include free scheduled maintenance for items such as oil changes, air filters and tire rotations. Some include consumables including brake pads and windshield wipers; others do not. They are typically for the first couple of years of ownership of a new car.

Other Years