2005 Kia Sedona

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$1,827–$5,939 Inventory Prices
Key Specs
Our Take
Overview
Photos
Reviews
Safety & Recalls
Warranty & CPO
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Key Specs

of the 2005 Kia Sedona. Base trim shown.

Our Take

From the Cars.com Vehicle Test Team

The Good

  • Interior space
  • Performance
  • Driving ease
  • Quietness
  • Ride comfort

The Bad

  • Fuel economy
  • Tight entry to driver's seat
  • Second-row seat comfort
  • ABS not standard
  • No side-impact airbags

Notable Features of the 2005 Kia Sedona

  • 195-hp, 3.5-liter V-6
  • Five-speed automatic
  • Optional DVD entertainment system
  • 10-year/100,000-mile powertrain warranty

2005 Kia Sedona Overview

By Cars.com Editors
Vehicle Overview
Launched in 2002, Kia's Sedona is equipped with a 3.5-liter V-6 that works with a five-speed-automatic transmission. The 2004 Sedona got an interior and exterior freshening. Second-row captain's chairs are available in the LX model for 2005, and the size of the rear drum brakes has increased.

Kia promotes the front-wheel-drive Sedona's price and value. Its warranty covers the powertrain for 10 years or 100,000 miles. A redesigned Sedona appeared at the 2005 Chicago Auto Show; it will go on sale later in the year as a 2006 model.


Exterior
The Sedona's styling breaks no new ground, so it's similar to the competition. Its sleek appearance features a long sloping hood that leads into a grille that has a horizontal-bar design and multireflector headlights. Dual sliding side doors are standard. The higher-end EX model adds a body-colored roof rack, fog lights, alloy wheels and additional chrome trim.

Interior
Sedonas can seat up to seven occupants. Depending on the model, the second row has standard bucket seats or a two-place bench seat. A three-person removable bench seat is installed in the third row. The Sedona has 10 cupholders.

Standard LX equipment includes front and rear air conditioning, twin glove boxes, a CD stereo, power windows and locks, cruise control, a tilt steering wheel, an intermittent rear wiper and washer, and rear privacy glass. The EX model adds heated mirrors, power rear-quarter windows, lighted vanity mirrors, keyless ent...
Vehicle Overview
Launched in 2002, Kia's Sedona is equipped with a 3.5-liter V-6 that works with a five-speed-automatic transmission. The 2004 Sedona got an interior and exterior freshening. Second-row captain's chairs are available in the LX model for 2005, and the size of the rear drum brakes has increased.

Kia promotes the front-wheel-drive Sedona's price and value. Its warranty covers the powertrain for 10 years or 100,000 miles. A redesigned Sedona appeared at the 2005 Chicago Auto Show; it will go on sale later in the year as a 2006 model.


Exterior
The Sedona's styling breaks no new ground, so it's similar to the competition. Its sleek appearance features a long sloping hood that leads into a grille that has a horizontal-bar design and multireflector headlights. Dual sliding side doors are standard. The higher-end EX model adds a body-colored roof rack, fog lights, alloy wheels and additional chrome trim.

Interior
Sedonas can seat up to seven occupants. Depending on the model, the second row has standard bucket seats or a two-place bench seat. A three-person removable bench seat is installed in the third row. The Sedona has 10 cupholders.

Standard LX equipment includes front and rear air conditioning, twin glove boxes, a CD stereo, power windows and locks, cruise control, a tilt steering wheel, an intermittent rear wiper and washer, and rear privacy glass. The EX model adds heated mirrors, power rear-quarter windows, lighted vanity mirrors, keyless entry and a cassette/CD stereo. Only a handful of options, including a DVD-based entertainment system, moonroof and leather upholstery, are offered.


Under the Hood
The Sedona's 3.5-liter V-6 develops 195 horsepower. The V-6 runs on regular gasoline and drives a five-speed-automatic transmission.

Safety
Antilock brakes are optional, but side-impact airbags are not available. Child-safety seat anchors are installed in the second row.

Driving Impressions
Taken as a whole, the Sedona ranks as top-notch even if it doesn't stand out from the minivan pack in any specific category. The Sedona is comfortable, smooth-riding, refined and energetic � it scores high in each important minivan attribute. Take its modest sticker price into consideration, and Kia clearly has another high-value model.

The Sedona accelerates in a hurry. Even when trudging up long grades, the V-6 pulls the minivan along effortlessly. The transmission responds smoothly, with only moderate delay when a downshift is necessary. The Sedona is exceptionally quiet, and it handles predictably. Not only is the steering pleasantly precise, but the Sedona is also easy to drive.

Most of the minivan's seats are comfortable and spacious, but the second-row seats are a bit hard. Getting into the driver's seat isn't as easy as it is in some minivans. The Sedona's EPA-estimated gas mileage trails the competition. Otherwise, quibbles are few for Kia's appealing, if unexceptional, minivan.



Latest 2005 Sedona Stories

What Drivers Are Saying

Exterior Styling
(3.8)
Performance
(4.0)
Interior Design
(3.9)
Comfort
(4.3)
Reliability
(3.9)
Value For The Money
(4.1)

Latest Reviews

(4.0)

Great Family Vehicle

by Sedonaowner from Alexander City on March 8, 2018

The van was comfortable, reliable, great on gas, great family vehicle. It got us where we needed to go safely and comfortably. Would recommend to others any day. Read full review

(5.0)

A lot of personality, efficient space

by USS KIA from SD on January 31, 2018

Easy to handle, had comforts my family needed, traveled smooth, easy to clean, chairs moved easily, got a lot of miles out of her. Read full review

Safety & Recalls

Recalls

The 2005 Kia Sedona currently has 2 recalls

Crash and Rollover Test Ratings

The 2005 Kia Sedona has not been tested.

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Cars.com Car Seat Check

Certified child passenger safety technicians conduct hands-on tests of a car’s Latch system and check the vehicle’s ability to accommodate different types of car seats. The Sedona received the following grades on a scale of A-F.*
* This score may not apply to all trims, especially for vehicles with multiple body styles that affect the space and design of the seating.

Warranty FAQs

What is a Bumper-to-Bumper warranty?

Often called a basic warranty or new-vehicle warranty, a bumper-to-bumper policy covers components like air conditioning, audio systems, vehicle sensors, fuel systems and major electrical components. Most policies exclude regular maintenance like fluid top offs and oil changes, but a few brands have separate free-maintenance provisions, and those that do offer them is slowly rising. Bumper-to-bumper warranties typically expire faster than powertrain warranties.

What is a Powertrain warranty?

Don't be misled a 10-year or 100,000-mile powertrain warranty doesn't promise a decade of free repairs for your car. It typically covers just the engine and transmission, along with any other moving parts that lead to the wheels, like the driveshaft and constant velocity joints. Some automakers also bundle seat belts and airbags into their powertrain warranties. With a few exceptions, powertrain warranties don't cover regular maintenance like engine tuneups and tire rotations.

What is included in Roadside Assistance?

Some automakers include roadside assistance with their bumper-to-bumper or powertrain warranties, while others have separate policies. These programs cover anything from flat-tire changes and locksmith services to jump-starts and towing. Few reimburse incidental costs like motel rooms (if you have to wait for repairs).

What other services could be included in a warranty?

Some automakers include free scheduled maintenance for items such as oil changes, air filters and tire rotations. Some include consumables including brake pads and windshield wipers; others do not. They are typically for the first couple of years of ownership of a new car.

What does CPO mean?

A certified pre-owned or CPO car has been inspected to meet minimum quality standards and typically includes some type of warranty. While dealers and third parties certify cars, the gold standard is an automaker-certified vehicle that provides a factory-backed warranty, often extending the original coverage. Vehicles must be in excellent condition and have low miles and wear to be certified, which is why off-lease vehicles feed many CPO programs.

See also the latest CPO incentives by automaker