2001 Mercury Villager

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(3.0) 4 reviews
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Overview
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Key Specs

of the 2001 Mercury Villager. Base trim shown.

2001 Mercury Villager Overview

By Cars.com Editors
Vehicle Overview
Slightly restyled at both the front and rear for 2001, with a revised liftgate area, the Mercury Villager is similar to the Nissan Quest. Both are built at the same plant in Ohio as a joint venture between Nissan and Ford. Each make was redesigned two years ago, and both are expected to be dropped early in the 2002 model year. But the styling for this year was done at Nissan’s design studio in California. Nissan also supplied the engine and most of the engineering development. The Quest and Villager differ mainly in their front-end appearance.

Three models are available: the Base, Sport and luxurious Estate. Gauges are new, and instruments have been redesigned. The available entertainment system, which was introduced last year, now has an overhead-mounted video screen. New 16-inch wheels have been installed on the Sport and Estate models, and the second-row bench option has been removed from the Sport.



Exterior
All Villagers are identical in size, with a 112.2-inch wheelbase and an overall length of 194.9 inches. Each minivan is 70.1 inches high. Dual sliding side doors are installed, but power operation is not available. All models now have remote keyless entry.



Interior
Seating for seven is standard. The base model has a two-person bench seat in the second row, while the Sport and Estate have two bucket seats. All models have a three-passenger bench in the third row, which slides back and forth on tracks in the floor. Sport and Estate models have an adjusta...
Vehicle Overview
Slightly restyled at both the front and rear for 2001, with a revised liftgate area, the Mercury Villager is similar to the Nissan Quest. Both are built at the same plant in Ohio as a joint venture between Nissan and Ford. Each make was redesigned two years ago, and both are expected to be dropped early in the 2002 model year. But the styling for this year was done at Nissan’s design studio in California. Nissan also supplied the engine and most of the engineering development. The Quest and Villager differ mainly in their front-end appearance.

Three models are available: the Base, Sport and luxurious Estate. Gauges are new, and instruments have been redesigned. The available entertainment system, which was introduced last year, now has an overhead-mounted video screen. New 16-inch wheels have been installed on the Sport and Estate models, and the second-row bench option has been removed from the Sport.



Exterior
All Villagers are identical in size, with a 112.2-inch wheelbase and an overall length of 194.9 inches. Each minivan is 70.1 inches high. Dual sliding side doors are installed, but power operation is not available. All models now have remote keyless entry.



Interior
Seating for seven is standard. The base model has a two-person bench seat in the second row, while the Sport and Estate have two bucket seats. All models have a three-passenger bench in the third row, which slides back and forth on tracks in the floor. Sport and Estate models have an adjustable-height rear parcel shelf behind the third-row seat, which keeps grocery bags and other items from rolling around.

The optional rear-seat entertainment system includes a VCR, flip-down video screen and headphones. Leather upholstery is standard in the Estate edition. With its middle seats removed and the rear bench pushed all the way forward, the Villager holds 127.6 cubic feet of cargo.



Under the Hood
Villagers and Quests use the same 170-horsepower, 3.3-liter V-6 engine, which mates with a four-speed-automatic transmission.



Safety
Antilock brakes are optional, but side-impact airbags are not available. New LATCH anchorage points for child-safety seats have been installed.



Driving Impressions
When on the move, both the Villager and Nissan’s Quest give the impression of being smaller than many of their competitors. The Villager’s dimensions put it between the typical regular-length and extended-wheelbase minivan. Performance and handling are at least adequate, though not exceptional. The available rear cargo shelf is a handy accessory for stowing grocery bags and odd-shaped items.

 
Reported by Jim Flammang  for cars.com
From the cars.com 2001 Buying Guide

Latest 2001 Villager Stories

Consumer Reviews

Exterior Styling
(3.2)
Performance
(3.0)
Interior Design
(3.2)
Comfort
(3.5)
Reliability
(3.5)
Value For The Money
(3.2)

What Drivers Are Saying

(3.0)

Spacious Family Van

by AMD725 from Fort Wayne, IN on August 24, 2017

This van got me many places with plenty of room for many. Spacious seating and nice trunk space for hauling. Read full review

(1.0)

I hate its van

by jamienae on August 11, 2017

I have to put more money into it then I have buying. I will not buy a another van like it again. I will get kind another van. Read full review

Safety & Recalls

Recalls

The 2001 Mercury Villager currently has 1 recall

Crash and Rollover Test Ratings

The 2001 Mercury Villager has not been tested.

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Cars.com Car Seat Check

Certified child passenger safety technicians conduct hands-on tests of a car’s Latch system and check the vehicle’s ability to accommodate different types of car seats. The Villager received the following grades on a scale of A-F.*
* This score may not apply to all trims, especially for vehicles with multiple body styles that affect the space and design of the seating.

Warranty FAQs

What is a Bumper-to-Bumper warranty?

Often called a basic warranty or new-vehicle warranty, a bumper-to-bumper policy covers components like air conditioning, audio systems, vehicle sensors, fuel systems and major electrical components. Most policies exclude regular maintenance like fluid top offs and oil changes, but a few brands have separate free-maintenance provisions, and those that do offer them is slowly rising. Bumper-to-bumper warranties typically expire faster than powertrain warranties.

What is a Powertrain warranty?

Don't be misled a 10-year or 100,000-mile powertrain warranty doesn't promise a decade of free repairs for your car. It typically covers just the engine and transmission, along with any other moving parts that lead to the wheels, like the driveshaft and constant velocity joints. Some automakers also bundle seat belts and airbags into their powertrain warranties. With a few exceptions, powertrain warranties don't cover regular maintenance like engine tuneups and tire rotations.

What is included in Roadside Assistance?

Some automakers include roadside assistance with their bumper-to-bumper or powertrain warranties, while others have separate policies. These programs cover anything from flat-tire changes and locksmith services to jump-starts and towing. Few reimburse incidental costs like motel rooms (if you have to wait for repairs).

What other services could be included in a warranty?

Some automakers include free scheduled maintenance for items such as oil changes, air filters and tire rotations. Some include consumables including brake pads and windshield wipers; others do not. They are typically for the first couple of years of ownership of a new car.

What does CPO mean?

A certified pre-owned or CPO car has been inspected to meet minimum quality standards and typically includes some type of warranty. While dealers and third parties certify cars, the gold standard is an automaker-certified vehicle that provides a factory-backed warranty, often extending the original coverage. Vehicles must be in excellent condition and have low miles and wear to be certified, which is why off-lease vehicles feed many CPO programs.

See also the latest CPO incentives by automaker