2001 Mercury Villager

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$22,510

starting MSRP

2001 Mercury Villager

Key specs

Base trim shown

Overview

3 trims

Starting msrp listed lowest to highest price

Wondering which trim is right for you?

Our 2001 Mercury Villager trim comparison will help you decide.

2001 Mercury Villager review: Our expert's take

Vehicle Overview
Slightly restyled at both the front and rear for 2001, with a revised liftgate area, the Mercury Villager is similar to the Nissan Quest. Both are built at the same plant in Ohio as a joint venture between Nissan and Ford. Each make was redesigned two years ago, and both are expected to be dropped early in the 2002 model year. But the styling for this year was done at Nissan’s design studio in California. Nissan also supplied the engine and most of the engineering development. The Quest and Villager differ mainly in their front-end appearance.

Three models are available: the Base, Sport and luxurious Estate. Gauges are new, and instruments have been redesigned. The available entertainment system, which was introduced last year, now has an overhead-mounted video screen. New 16-inch wheels have been installed on the Sport and Estate models, and the second-row bench option has been removed from the Sport.

Exterior
All Villagers are identical in size, with a 112.2-inch wheelbase and an overall length of 194.9 inches. Each minivan is 70.1 inches high. Dual sliding side doors are installed, but power operation is not available. All models now have remote keyless entry.

Interior
Seating for seven is standard. The base model has a two-person bench seat in the second row, while the Sport and Estate have two bucket seats. All models have a three-passenger bench in the third row, which slides back and forth on tracks in the floor. Sport and Estate models have an adjustable-height rear parcel shelf behind the third-row seat, which keeps grocery bags and other items from rolling around.

The optional rear-seat entertainment system includes a VCR, flip-down video screen and headphones. Leather upholstery is standard in the Estate edition. With its middle seats removed and the rear bench pushed all the way forward, the Villager holds 127.6 cubic feet of cargo.

Under the Hood
Villagers and Quests use the same 170-horsepower, 3.3-liter V-6 engine, which mates with a four-speed-automatic transmission.

Safety
Antilock brakes are optional, but side-impact airbags are not available. New LATCH anchorage points for child-safety seats have been installed.

Driving Impressions
When on the move, both the Villager and Nissan’s Quest give the impression of being smaller than many of their competitors. The Villager’s dimensions put it between the typical regular-length and extended-wheelbase minivan. Performance and handling are at least adequate, though not exceptional. The available rear cargo shelf is a handy accessory for stowing grocery bags and odd-shaped items.

 

Reported by Jim Flammang  for cars.com
From the cars.com 2001 Buying Guide

Consumer reviews

Rating breakdown (out of 5):
  • Comfort 3.5
  • Interior design 3.2
  • Performance 3.0
  • Value for the money 3.2
  • Exterior styling 3.2
  • Reliability 3.5

Most recent consumer reviews

3.4

Spacious Family Van

This van got me many places with plenty of room for many. Spacious seating and nice trunk space for hauling.

1.6

I hate its van

I have to put more money into it then I have buying. I will not buy a another van like it again. I will get kind another van.

3.6

I actually own a '96 M.V.

I bought a 1996 Villager through a private party for 1 grand and I've only had to replace a tie rod and the battery. $200 put into it in one year. Not bad at all. My family loves this van and if I had the money I'd buy the van for sale for sure! The van I own has 127,500 miles on it and I bought it in April of 1013. The only complaint I would have is that it isn't exactly big enough in the back for larger/taller adults. If it is mainly used for your spouse and children This is a great buy!

See all 4 consumer reviews