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2020 Cadillac CT5: Sized Right, Priced Right?

2020 Cadillac CT5-V

Just when it seems like automakers’ prime directive in their redesigns is “Bigger! Bigger!,” Cadillac makes the opposite move. The 2020 Cadillac CT5 replaces the CTS mid-size and ATS compact sedans in the automaker’s lineup, slotting between them in size and below both in price. It’ll start at $37,890, almost $10,000 less than the CTS and around $1,000 less than the ATS; all prices include a destination charge.

Related: 2020 Cadillac CT5: If Anyone Still Wants a Sports Sedan, Enjoy

The base price is for the entry-level Luxury model with rear-wheel drive, which undercuts similarly sized luxury rivals like the BMW 3 Series and Audi A4.

The compact sedan also will be available in Premium Luxury ($41,690) and Sport trims ($42,690); all-wheel drive is available across the lineup for an additional $2,600 to $3,090, depending on trim.

Standard features across the lineup include automatic emergency braking, forward collision alert, front pedestrian braking, a safety alert seat, a high-definition digital backup camera, driver vehicle mode control including a customizable My-Mode setting, Cadillac’s next-generation infotainment system with a 10-inch HD touchscreen and rotary controller, OnStar, keyless entry and pushbutton start, active noise cancellation and sound optimization.

The reported prices are for models with the 237-horsepower, turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine and 10-speed automatic transmission. A 335-hp, twin-turbocharged 3.0-liter V-6 will also be available, but Cadillac has not yet released pricing for that powertrain or the V-Series model, which will join the lineup after launch. The automaker also plans to make the Super Cruise autonomous driving system available on the CT5, but has not yet released a schedule or pricing.

Four-cylinder versions of the 2020 Cadillac CT5 will go on sale in the fall with the other models to follow.

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