2003 Buick Century

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$21,235

starting MSRP

2003 Buick Century

Key specs

Base trim shown

Overview

2 trims

Starting msrp listed lowest to highest price

Wondering which trim is right for you?

Our 2003 Buick Century trim comparison will help you decide.

2003 Buick Century review: Our expert's take

Posted on 10/23/2002
Vehicle Overview
Last reworked for the 1997 model year, Buick’s mainstay midsize front-wheel-drive sedan has been the company’s most popular model. Older buyers, in particular, tend to like the Century’s front bench seat, which offers space for three occupants.

Antilock brakes are no longer standard for the 2003 model year. The Century’s body gets a fresh look with a new graphite/chrome grille, chrome door-header openings, and new body-colored fascias and side molding. Additional interior trim padding aims to improve head-impact protection. New wood-grain switch plate covers are installed, and two new body colors will be offered.

Constructed from the same basic design as the sportier Regal, the four-door Century is more conservative in appearance, which helps account for its appeal to older buyers. Beneath the hood is a 3.1-liter V-6 engine, which differs from the Regal’s 3.8-liter power plant.

The Century has been a long-time rival of the full-size Buick LeSabre in the race to be the most popular Buick model. In its regular form, the Century’s front bench seat provides six-passenger capacity, which is offered on only a handful of midsize models.

Exterior
Although its styling is related to that of the jauntier Regal, the Century has a different grille, rear styling features, body trim and wheels. That makes it relatively easy to tell the two apart at a glance. Both Buick sedans are 72.7 inches wide, stand 56.6 inches tall and ride a 109-inch wheelbase, but at 194.6 inches long overall, the Century is a little shorter than the Regal.

Interior
Other than the Century’s bench seating — vs. the Regal’s sportier front bucket seats — these cars’ interiors are very similar. The Century comes in a single trim level, but Custom and Limited option groups are available. All versions of the Century have a three-place front bench seat with a folding center armrest that includes storage space. Trunk capacity totals 16.7 cubic feet.

Standard equipment includes dual-zone air conditioning, a tilt steering wheel, remote keyless entry, an AM/FM radio, and power windows and door locks. The Custom package adds folding power mirrors, cruise control, a cassette stereo and a six-way power driver’s seat. The Limited sedan features leather-surfaced seat trim and chrome wheel covers. GM’s OnStar communication system is a factory-installed option.

Under the Hood
A 3.1-liter V-6 engine produces 175 horsepower and drives a four-speed-automatic transmission. The higher-performing Regal, by comparison, holds a 3.8-liter V-6.

Safety
Antilock brakes with traction control are optional. A side-impact airbag for the driver’s seat is optional with a leather-trimmed interior.

 

Reported by Jim Flammang  for cars.com
From the cars.com 2003 Buying Guide

Consumer reviews

Rating breakdown (out of 5):
  • Comfort 4.7
  • Interior design 4.4
  • Performance 4.6
  • Value for the money 4.7
  • Exterior styling 4.3
  • Reliability 4.7

Most recent consumer reviews

4.7

Old, But Still Kickin'

I inherited mine from my late Grandma. It was in pretty rough shape, but a little love got her running like new. She's got over 76k miles on her, but handles like when Gramps first drove it home. I've had some minor issues with my sensors displaying a random "service this-or-that" after a full diagnostic and major work, but otherwise no mechanical issues that weren't from the previous owner's neglect. If you need a reliable car that doesn't draw unwanted attention, this is it. Nice enough to drive in most places, discreet enough to not likely be targeted by thieves.

5.0

I highly recommend this car.

Very comfortable and easy to drive. It's also very reliable . Great car all in all ! No problems what so ever. I definitely recommend the Buick Century.

4.7

Buicks are a best kept secret....

My mother bought a 2003 Buick before she passed away in 2011. I didn’t have a vehicle because of living overseas, so I inherited it. My brothers turned up their noses, so I started thinking it was considered an ‘old persons’ car. Now, I am the one to boast because it has treated me so well over the last 8 years. I drove 3,000 miles to N.C. and back to AZ and the only issue was that one of my tires blew, but I should have replaced it before the trip. I get yearly maintenance done on it, which is the key. I think it has great pick-up to getting on the freeway. At Lake Tahoe, I couldn’t remember where I had parked my car on the street. Two German men passed me and asked if they could help me find it. They asked what kind of car it was. When I told them it was a Century Buick they laughed and commented, “Oh, don’t worry about anyone stealing it.” Maybe that’s another plus. The thieves leave it alone.

See all 48 consumer reviews

Warranty

New car and Certified Pre-Owned programs by Buick
New car program benefits
Bumper-to-bumper
36 months/36,000 miles
Corrosion
72 months/100,000 miles
Powertrain
36 months/36,000 miles
Roadside assistance
36 months/36,000 miles
Certified Pre-Owned program benefits
Maximum age/mileage
5 model years or newer/up to 75,000 miles
Basic warranty terms
12 months/12,000 miles bumper-to-bumper original warranty, then may continue to 6 years/100,000 miles limited (depending on variables)
Powertrain
6 years/100,000 miles
Dealer certification required
172-point inspection
Roadside assistance
Yes
View all cpo program details

Have questions about warranties or CPO programs?

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