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2002 Honda Passport

$2,305 — $4,489 USED
Sport Utility
5 Seats
18-19 MPG
(Combined)
Key specs of the base trim
 — 
Compare 2 trims

Our Take

from the Cars.com expert editorial team

Vehicle Overview
The Honda Passport sport utility vehicle is essentially a rebadged Isuzu Rodeo. Honda’s larger SUV carries on without major change for 2002. Four-wheel-drive models have all-disc antilock brakes and a limited-slip differential. Available in LX, EX and upscale EX-L trim levels, the Passport is built in Indiana.

Honda sold 21,892 Passports during 2000 — a slight drop from 1999, according to Automotive News. A Passport replacement could emerge by the 2003 model year, possibly stemming from the design of the Acura MDX.



Exterior
Built with body-on-frame construction, the four-door Passport LX model measures 184 inches long overall with a 106.4-inch wheelbase. The EX or EX-L models are 6 inches shorter, because the spare tire stows under the vehicle rather than on the tailgate. A 4WD Passport is 68.8 inches tall and 70.4 inches wide. The side-hinged tailgate swings open to the left, and the separate rear window swings upward. Ground clearance is 8.2 inches on the EX model, which uses 16-inch tires rather than the 15-inchers equipped on the LX version. Skid plates go under the radiator, fuel tank and 4WD transfer case.

The Passport features softer edges than some SUVs. Flared wheel wells are integrated into the body, and character lines highlight the bumpers and bodysides. All Passports have a roof rack and body-color bumpers, and the EX adds a power moonroof, fog lights and rear privacy glass. The EX Luxury Package adds lower two-tone paint with color-matched ...
Vehicle Overview
The Honda Passport sport utility vehicle is essentially a rebadged Isuzu Rodeo. Honda’s larger SUV carries on without major change for 2002. Four-wheel-drive models have all-disc antilock brakes and a limited-slip differential. Available in LX, EX and upscale EX-L trim levels, the Passport is built in Indiana.

Honda sold 21,892 Passports during 2000 — a slight drop from 1999, according to Automotive News. A Passport replacement could emerge by the 2003 model year, possibly stemming from the design of the Acura MDX.



Exterior
Built with body-on-frame construction, the four-door Passport LX model measures 184 inches long overall with a 106.4-inch wheelbase. The EX or EX-L models are 6 inches shorter, because the spare tire stows under the vehicle rather than on the tailgate. A 4WD Passport is 68.8 inches tall and 70.4 inches wide. The side-hinged tailgate swings open to the left, and the separate rear window swings upward. Ground clearance is 8.2 inches on the EX model, which uses 16-inch tires rather than the 15-inchers equipped on the LX version. Skid plates go under the radiator, fuel tank and 4WD transfer case.

The Passport features softer edges than some SUVs. Flared wheel wells are integrated into the body, and character lines highlight the bumpers and bodysides. All Passports have a roof rack and body-color bumpers, and the EX adds a power moonroof, fog lights and rear privacy glass. The EX Luxury Package adds lower two-tone paint with color-matched bodyside moldings and fender flares.



Interior
Five occupants get two front bucket seats and a three-place, 60/40-split rear bench that folds down. Leather upholstery is standard on the EX and EX-L models, but the LX has cloth. Standard equipment includes air conditioning, power windows and locks, cruise control, a cargo net and cover, and an eight-speaker audio system. Power mirrors are heated on the EX, and the EX-L has a four-way power driver’s seat.



Under the Hood
Honda’s 205-horsepower, 3.2-liter V-6 engine teams with either a four-speed-automatic or five-speed-manual transmission. Both rear-wheel drive and four-wheel drive are available. A dashboard button engages the 4WD system, which has a Low range but is not intended for use on dry pavement. The Passport can tow as much as 4,500 pounds. Antilock brakes are standard, and side-impact airbags are not available.

 
Reported by Jim Flammang  for cars.com
From the cars.com 2002 Buying Guide

Consumer Reviews

What drivers are saying

4.5
2 reviews — Read All reviews
Exterior Styling
(4.0)
Performance
(4.0)
Interior Design
(4.0)
Comfort
(4.5)
Reliability
(4.5)
Value For The Money
(4.5)
(5.0)

all hondas have been know to be reliable

by eaglefan from philly pa on March 4, 2017

in the past i have owner honda accords and honda civic I would reccomend any honda any year. I would reccomend using honda serive . Cars.com was very helpfull in may search for my next auto. Read full review

(4.0)

I have loved this car

by Passport Driver on January 13, 2011

I have driven my passport for nearly 7 years. Had very few problems with it. MGP not so great, but knew when I bought it. Only iss ue I have had is that parts are not made for it any more so things ... Read full review

Safety

Recalls and crash tests

Recalls

The 2002 Honda Passport currently has 2 recalls


Crash and Rollover Test Ratings

The 2002 Honda Passport has not been tested.

Latest 2002 Passport Stories

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Cars.com Car Seat Check

Certified child passenger safety technicians conduct hands-on tests of a car’s Latch system and check the vehicle’s ability to accommodate different types of car seats. The Passport received the following grades on a scale of A-F.*
* This score may not apply to all trims, especially for vehicles with multiple body styles that affect the space and design of the seating.

Warranty FAQs

What is a Bumper-to-Bumper warranty?

Often called a basic warranty or new-vehicle warranty, a bumper-to-bumper policy covers components like air conditioning, audio systems, vehicle sensors, fuel systems and major electrical components. Most policies exclude regular maintenance like fluid top offs and oil changes, but a few brands have separate free-maintenance provisions, and those that do offer them is slowly rising. Bumper-to-bumper warranties typically expire faster than powertrain warranties.

What is a Powertrain warranty?

Don't be misled a 10-year or 100,000-mile powertrain warranty doesn't promise a decade of free repairs for your car. It typically covers just the engine and transmission, along with any other moving parts that lead to the wheels, like the driveshaft and constant velocity joints. Some automakers also bundle seat belts and airbags into their powertrain warranties. With a few exceptions, powertrain warranties don't cover regular maintenance like engine tuneups and tire rotations.

What is included in Roadside Assistance?

Some automakers include roadside assistance with their bumper-to-bumper or powertrain warranties, while others have separate policies. These programs cover anything from flat-tire changes and locksmith services to jump-starts and towing. Few reimburse incidental costs like motel rooms (if you have to wait for repairs).

What other services could be included in a warranty?

Some automakers include free scheduled maintenance for items such as oil changes, air filters and tire rotations. Some include consumables including brake pads and windshield wipers; others do not. They are typically for the first couple of years of ownership of a new car.

What does CPO mean?

A certified pre-owned or CPO car has been inspected to meet minimum quality standards and typically includes some type of warranty. While dealers and third parties certify cars, the gold standard is an automaker-certified vehicle that provides a factory-backed warranty, often extending the original coverage. Vehicles must be in excellent condition and have low miles and wear to be certified, which is why off-lease vehicles feed many CPO programs.

See also the latest CPO incentives by automaker