2002 Dodge Neon

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$465–$4,593 Inventory Prices

Key Specs

of the 2002 Dodge Neon base trim shown

  • Body Type:
  • Combined MPG:
    31 Combined MPG
  • Engine:
    132-hp, 2.0-liter I-4 (regular gas)
  • Drivetrain:
    Front-wheel Drive
  • Transmission:
    5-speed manual w/OD
  • View more specs

2002 Dodge Neon Overview

By Cars.com Editors
Vehicle Overview
Now marketed only as a Dodge model, the compact four-door front-drive sedan from DaimlerChrysler was redesigned for 2000. A new base model has been added for 2002, and all Neon models display a fresh crosshair grille. A four-speed-automatic transmission is newly optional, replacing the previous three-speed unit and putting the Neon on a par with its competitors. Other new options include chrome-finished wheels, a compass and an outside-temperature display.

Dodge is considered to be DaimlerChrysler’s performance-oriented division. It’s no surprise, then, that the Neon fold includes an R/T (road and track) model with a 150-horsepower engine, sport suspension and tires, and racy exterior trim. A few buyers go a step further, selecting the ACR (American Club Racer) model, which is a competitor to the R/T and comes with a stiffer suspension.

Exterior
The original Neon came in two- and four-door body styles. Since its 2000 redesign, Neon has been a four-door only. Its overall length is 174.4 inches, just slightly shorter than a Ford Focus or Honda Civic sedan. Styling evokes a kinship to the original Neon, but designers say they attempted to give the second-generation model a more mature, substantial appearance. The R/T and ACR models display unique front and rear fascias, as well as rear spoilers.

Interior
Seating five occupants, the Neon holds a pair of front buckets and

a three-place 60/40-split, folding rear seat. A rear-window defogger and a center conso...
Vehicle Overview
Now marketed only as a Dodge model, the compact four-door front-drive sedan from DaimlerChrysler was redesigned for 2000. A new base model has been added for 2002, and all Neon models display a fresh crosshair grille. A four-speed-automatic transmission is newly optional, replacing the previous three-speed unit and putting the Neon on a par with its competitors. Other new options include chrome-finished wheels, a compass and an outside-temperature display.

Dodge is considered to be DaimlerChrysler’s performance-oriented division. It’s no surprise, then, that the Neon fold includes an R/T (road and track) model with a 150-horsepower engine, sport suspension and tires, and racy exterior trim. A few buyers go a step further, selecting the ACR (American Club Racer) model, which is a competitor to the R/T and comes with a stiffer suspension.

Exterior
The original Neon came in two- and four-door body styles. Since its 2000 redesign, Neon has been a four-door only. Its overall length is 174.4 inches, just slightly shorter than a Ford Focus or Honda Civic sedan. Styling evokes a kinship to the original Neon, but designers say they attempted to give the second-generation model a more mature, substantial appearance. The R/T and ACR models display unique front and rear fascias, as well as rear spoilers.

Interior
Seating five occupants, the Neon holds a pair of front buckets and

a three-place 60/40-split, folding rear seat. A rear-window defogger and a center console with four cupholders are standard. Cargo volume is 13.1 cubic feet. A dashboard-mounted four-CD changer is optional on all models except the ACR. Leather upholstery is optional for the R/T and ACR in a package that also includes side-impact airbags.

Under the Hood
A 132-hp, 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine powers regular Neon models, and the sport-oriented R/T and ACR sedans get a 150-hp version of that engine. The base engine comes with either a five-speed-manual transmission or a new four-speed automatic, while the stronger four-cylinder teams only with the manual shift.

Safety
Low-speed traction control and antilock brakes come as an option package. Side-impact airbags also are optional.

Driving Impressions
Nimble handling and reasonably brisk performance with the 132-hp engine help make the smallest DaimlerChrysler model appealing to compact-car buyers. Particularly easy to drive, with quick and crisp steering, the sedan flaunts a friendly personality. Though it’s somewhat bouncy through harsh urban pavement, the ride is just fine on the highway. The taut suspension seldom overreacts and is nicely controlled, but the sedan does hit some bumps harder than expected.

Despite its undeniable merits, the Neon fails to stand significantly above the competition. Noise is one drawback. A quieter engine would make the Neon a stronger rival to class leaders, such as the Honda Civic. The new four-speed-automatic transmission is a welcome addition that brings the powertrain up to date. Rear-seat headroom is marginal, and the interior tends to elicit a feeling of snugness. The seatbacks aren’t the most comfortable, either, especially in the backseat.

 
Reported by Jim Flammang  for cars.com
From the cars.com 2002 Buying Guide

Latest 2002 Neon Stories

What Drivers Are Saying

Exterior Styling
(3.8)
Performance
(3.4)
Interior Design
(3.6)
Comfort
(3.8)
Reliability
(3.3)
Value For The Money
(3.4)

Latest Reviews

(4.0)

Hard to get in and out of. Too low to the ground.

by dallas67 on June 11, 2017

Bought the Neon from an elderly woman who was the second owner, who had been elderly as well and died. It only has 46K miles on it. After two weeks the car was running poorly and found out that the ... Read full review

(5.0)

Most reliable car ive ever owned

by Kathy from Buffalo, ny on June 5, 2017

This car has gotten me from point a to point b its runs when i want it to its a good car for the first time driver Read full review

Safety & Recalls

Recalls

The 2002 Dodge Neon currently has 0 recalls

Crash and Rollover Test Ratings

The 2002 Dodge Neon has not been tested.

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Cars.com Car Seat Check

Certified child passenger safety technicians conduct hands-on tests of a car’s Latch system and check the vehicle’s ability to accommodate different types of car seats. The Neon received the following grades on a scale of A-F.*
* This score may not apply to all trims, especially for vehicles with multiple body styles that affect the space and design of the seating.

Warranty FAQs

What is a Bumper-to-Bumper warranty?

Often called a basic warranty or new-vehicle warranty, a bumper-to-bumper policy covers components like air conditioning, audio systems, vehicle sensors, fuel systems and major electrical components. Most policies exclude regular maintenance like fluid top offs and oil changes, but a few brands have separate free-maintenance provisions, and those that do offer them is slowly rising. Bumper-to-bumper warranties typically expire faster than powertrain warranties.

What is a Powertrain warranty?

Don't be misled a 10-year or 100,000-mile powertrain warranty doesn't promise a decade of free repairs for your car. It typically covers just the engine and transmission, along with any other moving parts that lead to the wheels, like the driveshaft and constant velocity joints. Some automakers also bundle seat belts and airbags into their powertrain warranties. With a few exceptions, powertrain warranties don't cover regular maintenance like engine tuneups and tire rotations.

What is included in Roadside Assistance?

Some automakers include roadside assistance with their bumper-to-bumper or powertrain warranties, while others have separate policies. These programs cover anything from flat-tire changes and locksmith services to jump-starts and towing. Few reimburse incidental costs like motel rooms (if you have to wait for repairs).

What other services could be included in a warranty?

Some automakers include free scheduled maintenance for items such as oil changes, air filters and tire rotations. Some include consumables including brake pads and windshield wipers; others do not. They are typically for the first couple of years of ownership of a new car.

What does CPO mean?

A certified pre-owned or CPO car has been inspected to meet minimum quality standards and typically includes some type of warranty. While dealers and third parties certify cars, the gold standard is an automaker-certified vehicle that provides a factory-backed warranty, often extending the original coverage. Vehicles must be in excellent condition and have low miles and wear to be certified, which is why off-lease vehicles feed many CPO programs.

See also the latest CPO incentives by automaker