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2006 Toyota 4Runner

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$5,643 — $15,519 USED
10
Photos
Sport Utility
5-7 Seats
17-20 MPG
(Combined)
Key specs of the base trim
 — 
Compare 6 trims

Overview

Is this the car for you?

The Good

  • V-8 performance
  • Quietness
  • Ride quality
  • Refinement
  • Resale value

The Bad

  • Fuel economy
  • Ride quality in Sport Edition
  • Difficult entry and exit
  • Side airbags optional

What to Know

about the 2006 Toyota 4Runner
  • Standard 236-hp V-6
  • Available 260-hp V-8
  • Two or three rows of seats
  • RWD or 4WD
  • Face-lifted for 2006

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Our Take

from the Cars.com expert editorial team

Vehicle Overview
Toyota last redesigned its midsize 4Runner sport utility vehicle for 2003, making a V-8 engine available for the first time. At that time, Toyota wanted to make the truck-based 4Runner larger, roomier and more fuel-efficient, yet still retain its offroad capability.

For 2005, the V-8 gained 35 horsepower. In V-6 models, a five-speed-automatic transmission replaced the prior four-speed unit. A backup video camera was included on 4Runner Limited models equipped with a navigation system.

A face-lift for 2006 gives the 4Runner a new grille, bumpers, fog lamps, headlights and taillights, and redesigned lower cladding and overfenders. The Sport Edition gains a smoked chrome grille, and new 18-inch alloy wheels and a memory feature for the driver's seat are standard on the Limited. Audio systems have a mini-jack connector for an external audio source, like an MP3 player. Options include a navigation system and a rear-seat entertainment system with a 9-inch screen.

Three trim levels are available: SR5, Sport Edition and Limited. Four-wheel-drive-equipped 4Runners feature Downhill Assist Control that restricts speed when going down a steep grade. Hill-start Assist Control works to keep the SUV from rolling backward on an upgrade.


Exterior
Built on a 109.8-inch wheelbase, the 4Runner measures 189 inches long overall and stands 68.5 inches tall. Body-on-frame construction uses full-length boxed-section frame rails. The rear liftgate contains a power window.

Standard SR5 ...
Vehicle Overview
Toyota last redesigned its midsize 4Runner sport utility vehicle for 2003, making a V-8 engine available for the first time. At that time, Toyota wanted to make the truck-based 4Runner larger, roomier and more fuel-efficient, yet still retain its offroad capability.

For 2005, the V-8 gained 35 horsepower. In V-6 models, a five-speed-automatic transmission replaced the prior four-speed unit. A backup video camera was included on 4Runner Limited models equipped with a navigation system.

A face-lift for 2006 gives the 4Runner a new grille, bumpers, fog lamps, headlights and taillights, and redesigned lower cladding and overfenders. The Sport Edition gains a smoked chrome grille, and new 18-inch alloy wheels and a memory feature for the driver's seat are standard on the Limited. Audio systems have a mini-jack connector for an external audio source, like an MP3 player. Options include a navigation system and a rear-seat entertainment system with a 9-inch screen.

Three trim levels are available: SR5, Sport Edition and Limited. Four-wheel-drive-equipped 4Runners feature Downhill Assist Control that restricts speed when going down a steep grade. Hill-start Assist Control works to keep the SUV from rolling backward on an upgrade.


Exterior
Built on a 109.8-inch wheelbase, the 4Runner measures 189 inches long overall and stands 68.5 inches tall. Body-on-frame construction uses full-length boxed-section frame rails. The rear liftgate contains a power window.

Standard SR5 equipment includes 16-inch tires, multireflector headlights and taillights, and an integrated towing hitch. The Sport Edition features a hood scoop, a sport suspension and 17-inch tires. The Limited includes illuminated running boards.


Interior
Without the available third-row seat, the 4Runner seats five people on front buckets and a three-place, fold-down 60/40-split rear bench. Seven occupants fit inside models equipped with a third-row seat.

Leather upholstery, heated front seats and a power-adjustable driver's seat with a memory system are standard in the Limited. For 2006, power-adjustable front seats are standard in the Sport Edition and SR5 V8. Cargo-area backup mirrors mounted in the rear pillars allow the driver to see oncoming vehicles when backing out of a parking stall.


Under the Hood
Using new testing standards developed by the Society of Automotive Engineers for 2006 models, Toyota's 4.7-liter V-8 is rated at 260 hp and 306 pounds-feet of torque. The 4.0-liter V-6 produces 236 hp. Both engines team with a five-speed-automatic transmission. Rear- and four-wheel-drive models are available.

Safety
All-disc antilock brakes are standard. Seat-mounted side-impact airbags and side curtain-type airbags with rollover sensors are optional. Toyota's Vehicle Stability Control electronic stability system is standard.

Driving Impressions
Performance is a big plus when the 4Runner is equipped with the available, quiet V-8. From a standstill, a tap of the gas pedal sends this SUV practically lunging ahead. Acceleration while passing and merging is wholly confident.

The 4Runner steers easily and with a reasonably good feel, which is a cut above the truck-based SUV norm. Handling skills also rank above average. For this type of vehicle, the ride is pleasantly soft — not really cushy, but the suspension absorbs quite a few bumps. The Sport Edition feels a bit tauter, and its ride quality is a tad stiffer.


Consumer Reviews

What drivers are saying

4.8
91 reviews — Read All reviews
Exterior Styling
(4.7)
Performance
(4.7)
Interior Design
(4.5)
Comfort
(4.6)
Reliability
(4.8)
Value For The Money
(4.7)

Read reviews that mention:

(5.0)

Most reliable vehicle I’ve ever owned

by Car owner from MN on January 2, 2019

I own a 2006 Toyota 4Runner Limited V8 for 10 years now and have had excellent service. No issues, just standard maintenance like oil changes and tires Read full review

(4.0)

Very reliable and long lasting

by PrincessLeia from Cotati, California on December 6, 2018

Met our needs for a solid reliable car to use daily on long trips to the next city over and it has fantastic gas mileage. Read full review

Safety

Recalls and crash tests

Recalls

The 2006 Toyota 4Runner currently has 5 recalls


Crash and Rollover Test Ratings

Based on 2006 Toyota 4Runner SR5 V6

IIHS rates vehicles good, acceptable, marginal, or poor.

Head Restraints and Seats

Dynamic Rating
poor
Overall Rear
poor
Seat Head/Restraint Geometry
acceptable

Moderate overlap front

Chest
good
Head/Neck
good
Left Leg/Foot
good
Overall Front
good
Restraints
good
Right Leg/Foot
good
Structure/safety cage
good
Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) is a nonprofit research and communications organization funded by auto insurers.

Latest 2006 4Runner Stories

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Cars.com Car Seat Check

Certified child passenger safety technicians conduct hands-on tests of a car’s Latch system and check the vehicle’s ability to accommodate different types of car seats. The 4Runner received the following grades on a scale of A-F.*
* This score may not apply to all trims, especially for vehicles with multiple body styles that affect the space and design of the seating.

Warranty FAQs

What is a Bumper-to-Bumper warranty?

Often called a basic warranty or new-vehicle warranty, a bumper-to-bumper policy covers components like air conditioning, audio systems, vehicle sensors, fuel systems and major electrical components. Most policies exclude regular maintenance like fluid top offs and oil changes, but a few brands have separate free-maintenance provisions, and those that do offer them is slowly rising. Bumper-to-bumper warranties typically expire faster than powertrain warranties.

What is a Powertrain warranty?

Don't be misled a 10-year or 100,000-mile powertrain warranty doesn't promise a decade of free repairs for your car. It typically covers just the engine and transmission, along with any other moving parts that lead to the wheels, like the driveshaft and constant velocity joints. Some automakers also bundle seat belts and airbags into their powertrain warranties. With a few exceptions, powertrain warranties don't cover regular maintenance like engine tuneups and tire rotations.

What is included in Roadside Assistance?

Some automakers include roadside assistance with their bumper-to-bumper or powertrain warranties, while others have separate policies. These programs cover anything from flat-tire changes and locksmith services to jump-starts and towing. Few reimburse incidental costs like motel rooms (if you have to wait for repairs).

What other services could be included in a warranty?

Some automakers include free scheduled maintenance for items such as oil changes, air filters and tire rotations. Some include consumables including brake pads and windshield wipers; others do not. They are typically for the first couple of years of ownership of a new car.

What does CPO mean?

A certified pre-owned or CPO car has been inspected to meet minimum quality standards and typically includes some type of warranty. While dealers and third parties certify cars, the gold standard is an automaker-certified vehicle that provides a factory-backed warranty, often extending the original coverage. Vehicles must be in excellent condition and have low miles and wear to be certified, which is why off-lease vehicles feed many CPO programs.

See also the latest CPO incentives by automaker

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