2010 Dodge Grand Caravan

Change Year or Vehicle
$3,772–$13,788 USED Shop local deals
SAVE
Key Specs
Our Take
Road Test
Photos
Reviews
Safety & Recalls
Warranty & CPO
Compare
Back to top

Key Specs

of the 2010 Dodge Grand Caravan. Base trim shown.

Our Take

From the Cars.com Vehicle Test Team

The Good

  • Comfortable ride
  • Plenty-strong V-6 (3.8-liter)
  • Natural brake-pedal feel
  • Cargo versatility with Stow 'n Go seats

The Bad

  • Noisy suspension on rough roads
  • Small Stow 'n Go seats (second row)
  • Cramped driving position for tall drivers

Notable Features of the 2010 Dodge Grand Caravan

  • Standard electronic stability system
  • Standard three-zone manual climate control
  • Available Swivel 'n Go seating
  • Available power-folding third row
  • Available Sirius Backseat TV
  • Available blind spot and rear cross-path warning systems

2010 Dodge Grand Caravan Road Test

David Thomas

A surprising thing happened after Ford and GM left the minivan market: People kept buying vans. The uber-utility vehicle for families remains the minivan, and the Dodge Grand Caravan and related Chrysler Town & Country are among the best-sellers on the market.

But what makes them so attractive to buyers? Can't be the looks; they're as ordinary as can be. Is it the performance?

Are you kidding?

No, it's all about the space.

Utility
The best thing about living with a minivan is the amount of room you get. Not only are the seats comfortable, but the cargo area swallowed a full-size Phil & Teds stroller and still had room for another — with all three rows in place.

While sliding doors are a given, not all minivans have Chrysler's Stow 'n Go system, which is standard in the Grand Caravan. It's the only minivan with the feature, which allows the second-row seats to fold into the floor in a nifty, nearly magical disappearing act.

But what exactly does Stow 'n Go provide? Yes, it gives you a truly flat cargo floor by folding the second row into the floor; it basically transforms the minivan into a cargo van. But how often would a family use this configuration? Not very often. As I say in my video tour of the Grand Caravan, you'll use it when you take your kid to college.

With two little ones still needing strollers and diapers, it will be many years before I'm likely to need it.

The standard second-row Stow 'n Go seats ar...

A surprising thing happened after Ford and GM left the minivan market: People kept buying vans. The uber-utility vehicle for families remains the minivan, and the Dodge Grand Caravan and related Chrysler Town & Country are among the best-sellers on the market.

But what makes them so attractive to buyers? Can't be the looks; they're as ordinary as can be. Is it the performance?

Are you kidding?

No, it's all about the space.

Utility
The best thing about living with a minivan is the amount of room you get. Not only are the seats comfortable, but the cargo area swallowed a full-size Phil & Teds stroller and still had room for another — with all three rows in place.

While sliding doors are a given, not all minivans have Chrysler's Stow 'n Go system, which is standard in the Grand Caravan. It's the only minivan with the feature, which allows the second-row seats to fold into the floor in a nifty, nearly magical disappearing act.

But what exactly does Stow 'n Go provide? Yes, it gives you a truly flat cargo floor by folding the second row into the floor; it basically transforms the minivan into a cargo van. But how often would a family use this configuration? Not very often. As I say in my video tour of the Grand Caravan, you'll use it when you take your kid to college.

With two little ones still needing strollers and diapers, it will be many years before I'm likely to need it.

The standard second-row Stow 'n Go seats are also less comfortable than the optional Swivel 'n Go seats, which can turn to face the third row. Swivel 'n Go seats can also have built-in booster seats for younger children. These seats are only $325 and, like many competitors' second-row seats, can be removed from the cabin to create a flat floor.

Again, the question remains: When would you need the stowing feature instead?

Performance
Interestingly enough, the Grand Caravan is available in four trim levels and comes with a choice of three V-6 engines. It gets a bit dizzying, but the base SE and Cargo versions get a 175-horsepower, 3.3-liter V-6 that teams with a four-speed automatic transmission. That combination gets 17/24 mpg city/highway.

The Hero trim level (Chrysler and Dodge added new trim designations last year, which may be confusing for current owners) and SXT pack a 197-hp, 3.8-liter V-6 and six-speed automatic that are good for 16/23 mpg. The nearly top-of-the-line Crew model that I tested — formerly the SXT — has a 251-hp, 4.0-liter V-6 with a six-speed automatic that gets 17/25 mpg. Giving a higher trim level the most advanced, efficient engine is similar to what Honda does with its Odyssey minivan.

Having driven the 3.8-liter V-6 before, I much preferred the 4.0-liter. It felt like there was real power under the hood, as opposed to the 3.8's sluggish responses. The fact that it gets better mileage is just icing on the cake. Of course, it comes at a price — specifically, a $3,300-higher starting MSRP.

Like in most minivans, handling and steering are unremarkable, but I was impressed with the Grand Caravan's ride, which was comfortable and handled road imperfections, like overpass expansion joints, well. I remember testing this generation of Chrysler's minivan when it debuted and thinking that the body shimmied a lot over rough surfaces. It seems more solid now. Is it as good as the Toyota Sienna and Odyssey? No, but it is good enough — especially for the price.

Interior
The Grand Caravan's cabin, however, isn't good enough for its price. My fully loaded Crew's $39,160 sticker price included leather seats and some nicer trim pieces, like woodgrain accents, but it wasn't anywhere near as opulent as the Honda Odyssey EX-L, which costs $37,985 similarly equipped.

Busy families – and messy ones, like mine – will likely go with a more basic, less expensive trim in the $25,000-$30,000 range, making it feel like you're getting more for your money.

As in many recent Chrysler products, the cabin plastics feel rough to the touch and are unlike those from almost any other automaker. The drawers that house the cupholders and storage areas slide out rigidly, and the dashboard and door panels ring with a hollow sound when tapped.

These are the Grand Caravan's downsides, and if it weren't a minivan — a vehicle made to cart unruly children — they would be more significant. While unsightly, the materials will likely hold up to the wear and tear that the average family will inflict.

Safety
The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety awarded the Grand Caravan top scores of Good in its frontal-offset and side-impact crash tests. In rear-impact testing, which rates protection against whiplash injuries, Grand Caravans built since April 2010 scored Good, but those built prior received a Marginal overall rating. The 2010 Odyssey and 2011 Sienna have top scores in all three tests, and the Sienna earned a Top Safety Pick designation because it also scored Good in IIHS' roof-strength test. (As of publication, the Odyssey and Grand Caravan hadn't been subjected to the roof-strength test.)

Stability control is standard, as are side curtain airbags for all three rows.

Grand Caravan in the Market
The Grand Caravan and its Chrysler Town & Country sibling still make up the largest chunk of the minivan segment thanks to the value offered by their more affordable trim levels. However, they'll probably only continue to sell in such volumes because of pricing and incentives. Matched against the best in the segment, when prices are similar, the Grand Caravan just doesn't compare.

Send David an email  



2010 Grand Caravan Video

Cars.com's Dave Thomas takes a look at the 2010 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT. It competes with the Honda Odyssey, Kia Sedona and Toyota Sienna.

Latest 2010 Grand Caravan Stories

Consumer Reviews

Exterior Styling
(4.0)
Performance
(4.1)
Interior Design
(4.3)
Comfort
(4.2)
Reliability
(4.1)
Value For The Money
(4.1)

What Drivers Are Saying

(5.0)

Best one yet

by Big Dave from West St Paul, Manitoba Canada on August 21, 2018

I've had seven Caravans and I've enjoyed this one the most. I got this one loaded with everything and the only complaint I've had since day one is that the new version of Uconnect and it's voice ... Read full review

(5.0)

Best family vehicle out there

by DC129 on August 7, 2018

This minivan has been a blessing. Great value for what you get. A safe reliable comfortable vehicle with good gas mileage and plenty of options. Read full review

Safety & Recalls

Recalls

The 2010 Dodge Grand Caravan currently has 0 recalls

Crash and Rollover Test Ratings

The 2010 Dodge Grand Caravan has not been tested.

Manufacturer Warranty

  • Bumper-to-Bumper

    36 months / 36,000 miles

  • Powertrain

    60 months / 100,000 miles

  • Roadside Assistance

    36 months / 36,000 miles

CPO Program & Warranty

Certified Pre-Owned by Dodge

Program Benefits

24-hour roadside assistance, Carfax vehicle history report, rental car and 24-hour towing, and first day rental

  • Limited Warranty

    7 years / 100,000 miles

    7 years/100,000 mile warranty on all certified vehicles
  • Eligibility

    Under 5 years / 75,000 miles

    Vehicles receive a 125 point inspection and reconditioning.

    See inspection details.

Change Year or Vehicle

0 / 0 0 Photos
0 / 0

Cars.com Car Seat Check

Certified child passenger safety technicians conduct hands-on tests of a car’s Latch system and check the vehicle’s ability to accommodate different types of car seats. The Grand Caravan received the following grades on a scale of A-F.*
* This score may not apply to all trims, especially for vehicles with multiple body styles that affect the space and design of the seating.

Warranty FAQs

What is a Bumper-to-Bumper warranty?

Often called a basic warranty or new-vehicle warranty, a bumper-to-bumper policy covers components like air conditioning, audio systems, vehicle sensors, fuel systems and major electrical components. Most policies exclude regular maintenance like fluid top offs and oil changes, but a few brands have separate free-maintenance provisions, and those that do offer them is slowly rising. Bumper-to-bumper warranties typically expire faster than powertrain warranties.

What is a Powertrain warranty?

Don't be misled a 10-year or 100,000-mile powertrain warranty doesn't promise a decade of free repairs for your car. It typically covers just the engine and transmission, along with any other moving parts that lead to the wheels, like the driveshaft and constant velocity joints. Some automakers also bundle seat belts and airbags into their powertrain warranties. With a few exceptions, powertrain warranties don't cover regular maintenance like engine tuneups and tire rotations.

What is included in Roadside Assistance?

Some automakers include roadside assistance with their bumper-to-bumper or powertrain warranties, while others have separate policies. These programs cover anything from flat-tire changes and locksmith services to jump-starts and towing. Few reimburse incidental costs like motel rooms (if you have to wait for repairs).

What other services could be included in a warranty?

Some automakers include free scheduled maintenance for items such as oil changes, air filters and tire rotations. Some include consumables including brake pads and windshield wipers; others do not. They are typically for the first couple of years of ownership of a new car.

What does CPO mean?

A certified pre-owned or CPO car has been inspected to meet minimum quality standards and typically includes some type of warranty. While dealers and third parties certify cars, the gold standard is an automaker-certified vehicle that provides a factory-backed warranty, often extending the original coverage. Vehicles must be in excellent condition and have low miles and wear to be certified, which is why off-lease vehicles feed many CPO programs.

See also the latest CPO incentives by automaker