2018 Chicago Auto Show: What to Expect

CARS.COM — L.A.'s got the glitz. Detroit's got the industry juice. That, in addition to preceding Chicago on the auto-show-season calendar typically gives those towns an advantage when it comes to big, sexy new-model debuts. But in Chicago, the nation's third-largest city and cultural mecca of the Midwest, pomp and prestige take a backseat to practicality: This is a car-shopping show that caters to consumers — are you ready to find your new ride?

Related: More 2018 Chicago Auto Show Coverage

Besides the Windy City's convenient central geographical position between New York and L.A., the Chicago Auto Show also uses its third-place position among the Big Four auto shows to its (and car shoppers') advantage — not to mention its 1 million square feet of floor space, the largest among fellow auto exhibitions. Of the big model debuts we've covered at the 2017 Los Angeles Auto Show and 2018 North American International Auto Show in Detroit, visitors to the 2018 Chicago Auto Show will get to see ... well, just about all of 'em.

Miss massive bows by the 2019 Chevrolet Silverado 1500, Ram 1500 and Ford Ranger? How 'bout exciting SUV and crossover unveils like the 2018 Jeep Wrangler, 2018 Nissan Kicks, 2018 Hyundai Kona, 2019 Mercedes-Benz G-Class and 2019 Subaru Ascent? That's in addition to cool concept cars from various shows as far back as 2016, such as the Cadillac Escala concept (the third in a concept trilogy that started with the Elmiraj and Ciel), Infiniti Q Inspiration, Lexus LF-1 Limitless, Mitsubishi Re-Model A (an old-timey car outfitted with up-to-the-minute technology) or Toyota FT-AC. And if you haven't yet come across Cars.com's Best of 2018 award winner the Volkswagen Atlas, it'll be there, too.

None of this is to say there won't be new-model debuts, albeit considerably more muted compared with the likes of the G-Class or 2019 Chevrolet Corvette ZR-1. The all-new-for-2019 Volkswagen Arteon sedan (appearing in the U.S. for the first time), 2019 Ford Transit Connect full-size van and 2019 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid top the growing list of proper debuts. That's in addition to anniversary editions from Lexus and Subaru, as well as a trio of Toyota off-roaders and a couple of crazy Nissan winter-apocalypse concept cars.

The 2018 Chicago Auto Show, once again at Chicago's McCormick Place, 2301 S. Lake Shore Drive, opens with media-only and charity previews Feb. 8-9, after which the doors open to the public Feb. 10-19; hours are 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Feb. 10-18 and 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Feb. 19. Admission is $13 for adults, $7 for seniors age 62 or older and children age 7 to 12; kids age 6 or younger are free with a paying adult family member. Tickets are available on site and online by going here.

Here's everything we know about so far:

Debuts

2019 Ford Edge Titanium Elite

2019 Ford Transit Connect

2019 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid

2018 Lexus RC F and GS F 10th anniversary special editions

Nissan Armada Snow Patrol project car

Nissan 370Zki project car

Subaru 50th anniversary limited editions

Toyota 4Runner, Tacoma and Tundra TRD Pro models

2019 Volkswagen Arteon

Encores

2019 Acura RDX Prototype

2018 BMW X2

2019 BMW i8

Cadillac Escala concept

2019 Chevrolet Corvette

2019 Chevrolet Silverado

2019 Ford Edge

2019 Ford Ranger

2019 Honda Insight Prototype

2018 Hyundai Kona

2019 Hyundai Veloster

Infiniti Q Inspiration Concept

2019 Infiniti QX50

2018 Jeep Wrangler

2019 Jeep Cherokee

2019 Kia Forte

2019 Kia Sorento

Lexus LF-1 Limitless concept

2018 Lexus RX 350L, RX 450hL

2019 Lincoln MKC

2019 Lincoln Nautilus

2018 Mazda6

2019 Mercedes-Benz CLS

2019 Mercedes-Benz G-Class

2018 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross

Mitsubishi Re-Model A

2018 Nissan Kicks

2018 Nissan Leaf

2019 Mini Hardtop, Convertible

2019 Ram 1500

2018 Rolls-Royce Phantom

2019 Subaru Ascent

2019 Toyota Avalon

Toyota FT-AC concept

2018 Volkswagen Atlas

2019 Volkswagen Jetta

2018 Volkswagen Tiguan R-Line

2019 Volvo XC40

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