2011 Chevrolet Traverse

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$29,370

starting MSRP

2011 Chevrolet Traverse
2011 Chevrolet Traverse

Key specs

Base trim shown

Overview

The good:

  • Ride quality
  • Cargo volume
  • Crash-test ratings
  • Relative gas mileage
  • Cabin quality
  • Towing capacity

The bad:

  • Somewhat unresponsive transmission
  • Comfort of cloth upholstery
  • Large turning circle
  • Third-row comfort
  • Highway wind noise
  • Price of loaded models

4 trims

Starting msrp listed lowest to highest price

Wondering which trim is right for you?

Our 2011 Chevrolet Traverse trim comparison will help you decide.

Notable features

  • Malibu-inspired styling
  • Three rows of seats
  • Standard 281-hp V-6
  • FWD or AWD
  • Related to GMC Acadia and Buick Enclave

2011 Chevrolet Traverse review: Our expert's take

By David Thomas

The verdict:

Versus the competiton:

Editor’s note: This review was written in February 2010 about the 2010 Chevrolet Traverse. Little of substance has changed with this year’s model. To see what’s new for 2011, click here, or check out a side-by-side comparison of the two model years.

As car buyers gravitate away from SUVs and minivans toward three-row crossovers, the Chevy Traverse has become one of GM’s biggest successes. Its good looks, winning drivability and interior quality help it compete well with the rest of the class.

For 2010, the Chevy Traverse remains relatively unchanged from the 2009 model reviewed last year, when the crossover was all-new. You can see what’s changed between the two here, or read our 2009 review here. For this review, I tested the top-of-the-line LTZ, front-wheel-drive model that starts at $37,985; the base Traverse starts at $29,224. Our tester’s MSRP, with options and destination fee, was more than $41,000.

Utility for Families
There’s no escaping it: If you’re shopping for a Traverse, there’s a good chance you have kids. If you don’t, well … you’re getting a lot of crossover for your friends. But if you’re in the parent group, there are a few things you’ll definitely want to know before you consider the Traverse.

As the parent of two kids under age 2, the Traverse isn’t a perfect fit for my family. The height of the rear passenger seats is a little too much for lifting kids in and out of their child-safety seats. While it’s not so high that young families should immediately cross it off their shopping list, there are a number of vehicles that make the task easier — for example, Ford’s low-riding Flex.

While the Traverse is available with a second-row bench, my test car was equipped with two captain’s chairs in that spot, which isn’t as accommodating for child-safety seats as the standard third-row bench. If you have older kids, they’ll likely prefer this setup, as it gives them plenty of breathing space. It also allows for an open pass-through to the third row, which is a nice feature often found in minivans. Families with dogs may also appreciate this. The Flex — and the similar Lincoln MKT — don’t feature a large pass-through like this, so it isn’t as easy to maneuver between rows.

With the captain’s chairs, you can seat a maximum of seven. To seat eight, you’ll need the second-row bench. There’s an acceptable amount of cargo room with the third row in place, but for road trips you’ll likely have to fold one or both of the third-row seats flat to make room for luggage.

There’s 24.4 cubic feet of cargo room with the third row in place, which tops competitors like the Flex, at 20 cubic feet, and the Mazda CX-9, at 17.2 cubic feet. Its overall cargo volume is a significant 116.4 cubic feet with both the second and third rows folded flat, compared with only 83.2 cubic feet in the Flex and 100.7 cubic feet in the CX-9.

Performance
The Traverse is a terrific around-town vehicle. I was really surprised by how easy it was to park the three-row crossover; it handled like a much smaller car. Compared with the Flex and even the CX-9, the Traverse is the easiest to drive and navigate in tight spaces.

The Traverse comes with only one engine option: a 281-horsepower, 3.6-liter V-6 teamed with a six-speed automatic transmission and either front- or all-wheel drive. Mileage is above average for the class, at 17/24 mpg city/highway with front-wheel drive and 16/23 mpg with all-wheel drive. That compares with 17/23 mpg in a front-wheel-drive Honda Pilot and 16/22 mpg for an all-wheel-drive Pilot. The front-wheel-drive Flex V-6 gets 17/24 mpg, while the all-wheel-drive model gets 16/22 mpg.

When the Traverse’s V-6 debuted in the nearly identical Saturn Outlook and GMC Acadia crossovers, senior editor Joe Wiesenfelder noted a serious delay in gear changes when needing to pass at highway speeds. The problem was remedied in a swift recall, but in the 2010 Traverse I still found noticeable hesitation when needing to pass on the highway. Is it dangerous? Not likely, but it doesn’t instill confidence and remains a black mark.

There’s plenty of power for cruising at highway speeds, but the more people you load in the Traverse the less energetic it becomes. The Flex offers an optional 355-hp, turbocharged V-6 engine that’s rather expensive, but it offers a lot of performance and is unmatched in this class in terms of power. It also gets mileage identical to the non-turbo all-wheel-drive Flex. The Flex SEL EcoBoost with all-wheel drive starts at $36,595 and comes with many of the same features as our LTZ Traverse, like standard leather heated seats.

Safety
The 2010 Chevy Traverse earned the top score, Good, in front, side and rear crash tests from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. In the past, this would have garnered it Top Safety Pick status, which it had for 2009, but now IIHS requires vehicles to pass a roof strength test as well, to which the Traverse has not yet been submitted. It does have a four-star rollover rating from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Click here for a full list of safety features.

Traverse in the Market
It’s not the cheapest or fastest three-row crossover on the market, but Chevy is winning over customers with the Traverse’s styling. Who would have thought?

Add in its utility and relative nimbleness, and there are even more legitimate reasons to consider the Traverse. This class is increasingly competitive, though, and shoppers would do well to cross-shop the Flex, CX-9 and Pilot.

Send David an email  

Consumer reviews

Rating breakdown (out of 5):
  • Comfort 4.4
  • Interior design 4.2
  • Performance 4.2
  • Value for the money 4.1
  • Exterior styling 4.4
  • Reliability 4.1

Most recent consumer reviews

5.0

It met my need to sit more than 5

With 7 small grandchildren it met my need for lots of space for Kids and car seats at that time. Since I'm no longer in the transport mode, i no longer needed a larger car.

3.1

Bleeding me dry after 100,000 miles

Was pretty reliable until it started pushing the 100,000 mile mark. Several recalls (some that should have been) blown engine at 120,000 in spite of regular servicing. Have had it in and out of shop since.

4.0

One of the most attractive suv that looked like a

This car met most my needs to and from work. I didn't get the chance to drive it out of town. I've change a cracked windshield, gas tank, bulbs, breaks, battery, breaks and roaters, then immediately the performance of the Travers declined. Driving home from the fix it shop fine a day later traction control, stability, abs, lights all on. I took it back to the shop I was told that the lights would be reset or you could have a bad sensor. Had to go to work so driving home at 2am the lodge freeway the back wheel starts grinding now it need hub or wheel bearing replaced, on my back to work the next afternoon and paying for the bearing repair, made it all the way to Jefferson off the lodge and stopped at the light turned green hit the accelerator and the car would not move. I turned the engine off to restart it again a lot of clanking and sounds of metal tapping lights and warning messages. Long story short a timing chain or a engine replacement is needed. So I'm looking for a long lasting car or suv thats proving to be built to last.

See all 126 consumer reviews

Warranty

New car and Certified Pre-Owned programs by Chevrolet
Certified Pre-Owned program benefits
Maximum age/mileage
5 model years or newer/up to 75,000 miles
Basic warranty terms
12 months/12,000 miles bumper-to-bumper original warranty, then may continue to 6 years/100,000 miles limited (depending on variables)
Powertrain
6 years/100,000 miles
Dealer certification required
172-point inspection
Roadside assistance
Yes
View all cpo program details

Have questions about warranties or CPO programs?

Compare the competitors

2012

GMC Acadia

$32,835

starting MSRP

2011

Chevrolet Equinox

$22,995

starting MSRP

2012

Chevrolet Traverse

$29,660

starting MSRP

See all 2011 Chevrolet Traverse articles