2011 Chrysler Town & Country

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Key Specs
Our Take
Road Test
Photos
Reviews
Safety & Recalls
Warranty & CPO
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Key Specs

of the 2011 Chrysler Town & Country. Base trim shown.

Our Take

From the Cars.com Vehicle Test Team

The Good

  • Seating versatility
  • Kid-friendly features
  • Innovative storage solutions
  • Nicer interior quality
  • Better handling

The Bad

  • Small navigation system display
  • Seating comfort with fold-into-floor seats
  • Third-row legroom

Notable Features of the 2011 Chrysler Town & Country

  • Significantly revised for 2011
  • New 3.6-liter V-6 engine
  • Standard side curtain airbags
  • Standard stability system
  • Standard fold-into-floor second-row seats

2011 Chrysler Town & Country Road Test

Mike Hanley

If you think the minivan segment is DOA, think again. Essentially every minivan on sale in the U.S. has been redesigned recently, and one of the newest is the 2011 Chrysler Town & Country, a historically strong seller.

The Town & Country has had its problems, but the changes for 2011 go a long way toward fixing them, making it an appealing choice in this reinvigorated segment.

This minivan is offered in three versions — Touring, Touring-L and Limited — for 2011. All trim levels get a new V-6 engine and lots of standard safety features. I tested a Touring version, which starts at $30,160 but was $33,805 as-tested. To see how the models compare, check out a side-by-side comparison of the three trims.

Styling

The overall shape of the Town & Country hasn't changed much for 2011, but there are a number of different styling cues, some more subtle than others. If you're familiar with the van, one of the first things you'll notice is its updated nose, which features Chrysler's new slatted grille and revised lower-bumper styling. Apart from maintaining the family resemblance to the 200 and 300 sedans, the new grille just looks better than the old design. The taillights and side and rear trim are also new.

Given the utilitarian nature of minivans, their styling is unlikely to make or break them. Some competitors, like Nissan with its Quest, have tried to make unique design a minivan focal point, but it's refreshing to see a cleanly style...

If you think the minivan segment is DOA, think again. Essentially every minivan on sale in the U.S. has been redesigned recently, and one of the newest is the 2011 Chrysler Town & Country, a historically strong seller.

The Town & Country has had its problems, but the changes for 2011 go a long way toward fixing them, making it an appealing choice in this reinvigorated segment.

This minivan is offered in three versions — Touring, Touring-L and Limited — for 2011. All trim levels get a new V-6 engine and lots of standard safety features. I tested a Touring version, which starts at $30,160 but was $33,805 as-tested. To see how the models compare, check out a side-by-side comparison of the three trims.

Styling

The overall shape of the Town & Country hasn't changed much for 2011, but there are a number of different styling cues, some more subtle than others. If you're familiar with the van, one of the first things you'll notice is its updated nose, which features Chrysler's new slatted grille and revised lower-bumper styling. Apart from maintaining the family resemblance to the 200 and 300 sedans, the new grille just looks better than the old design. The taillights and side and rear trim are also new.

Given the utilitarian nature of minivans, their styling is unlikely to make or break them. Some competitors, like Nissan with its Quest, have tried to make unique design a minivan focal point, but it's refreshing to see a cleanly styled minivan like the Town & Country. Its designers know what it is and are all right with it.

Ride & Handling

The previous Town & Country's ride quality brought to mind a big American car from the '70s; it rode softly, with a bit of wallowing thrown in. The 2011's new suspension tuning keeps body motion better in check, but still delivers a comfort-oriented experience that families will like. It also corners surprisingly well without much body roll — even when driven on winding roads.

Complementing the suspension changes is a body structure that's notably stiffer than the outgoing van's. The previous Town & Country was a creaky beast — you could hear the body flexing when traveling on uneven pavement. It didn't say "quality" when you heard it, even if that feeling came more from perception than from reality. Perceptions matter, though, and that creakiness is gone now.

From Three V-6 Engines to One

Last year, Town & Country shoppers had a choice of three V-6 engines, but for 2011 all models are powered by a 283-horsepower, 3.6-liter V-6 that teams with a six-speed automatic transmission. This is Chrysler's new Pentastar V-6. It's used widely in the automaker's lineup, and it feels strong enough in this van. The automatic shifts smoothly, and the drivetrain gets an EPA-estimated 17/25 mpg city/highway on regular gas. The minivan also includes an Econ mode that improves gas mileage by altering the transmission's shifting behavior.

The Inside

Chrysler has been routinely criticized for its subpar interior quality, and with good reason. One of the biggest issues has been blocky design and poor materials quality. Both of those problems have been remedied in the 2011 Town & Country's substantially updated cabin.

Even though the minivan's all-new dashboard is made of hard plastic, it has a nicely grained, low-gloss appearance. Overall, the new interior trim makes the van feel more luxurious than the Honda Odyssey, if not the new Nissan Quest. Considering where Chrysler interiors have been, this is a dramatic improvement.

Chrysler has updated one of its signature minivan features for 2011: Stow 'n Go second-row seats. The seats, which are standard, fold into the floor with just one touch of a lever, articulating forward and into bins in the floor. (If the bin isn't open or the front seat isn't far enough forward, the seat just flips forward to make it easier to access the third row.) Chrysler says the Stow 'n Go seats are now larger for better comfort, but you still sit pretty low to the floor in them, which limits their appeal for adult passengers. Traditional second-row bucket seats are optional.

Safety

Nearly all the 2011 Town & Country's safety features are standard. That includes antilock brakes, side-impact airbags for the front seats, side curtain airbags for all three rows, an electronic stability system, active head restraints for the front seats and power-adjustable pedals.

In addition, the Town & Country comes standard with "SafetyTec," which encompasses a number of driver aids. These include rain-sensing windshield wipers, rear parking sensors, a backup camera and a blind spot warning system. For a full list of safety features, check out the Standard Equipment & Specs page.

As of publication, the 2011 Town & Country hadn't been crash-tested by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety or the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

Town & Country in the Market

The Town & Country finished last year as the best-selling minivan in the U.S., and many of those sales were of the outgoing version; the 2011 Town & Country didn't reach dealerships until late in the year.

With its updates for 2011, the Town & Country is well-positioned to keep its title in the segment despite revised competition from Nissan, Honda and Toyota. What will be interesting to see is whether these new minivans foreshadow a growth in the minivan segment relative to the rest of the market. With a post-recession citizenry focused on more practical purchases, the time might be ripe for such a shift.

Send Mike an email  



Latest 2011 Town & Country Stories

Consumer Reviews

Exterior Styling
(4.8)
Performance
(4.7)
Interior Design
(4.8)
Comfort
(4.8)
Reliability
(4.8)
Value For The Money
(4.7)

What Drivers Are Saying

(5.0)

Funnest Car i have had so far

by Justin from Sartell on September 25, 2018

This van has more cool features then i would have guessed my favorite being the DVD player for the kids (for obvious reasons) but really i love everything about this vehicle. Read full review

(5.0)

Hands down best investment for our family

by Marie from Mi on August 21, 2018

This car is very practical for families. I love that we can take long trips and kids are comfortable and entertained drives well not bad on gas. Read full review

Safety & Recalls

Recalls

The 2011 Chrysler Town & Country currently has 0 recalls

IIHS Crash and Rollover Test Ratings

Based on 2011 Chrysler Town & Country Touring

IIHS rates vehicles good, acceptable, marginal, or poor.

Head Restraints and Seats

Dynamic Rating
good
Overall Rear
good
Seat Head/Restraint Geometry
good

Moderate overlap front

Chest
good
Head/Neck
good
Left Leg/Foot
good
Overall Front
good
Restraints
good
Right Leg/Foot
good
Structure/safety cage
good

Side

Driver Head Protection
good
Driver Head and Neck
good
Driver Pelvis/Leg
good
Driver Torso
good
Overall Side
good
Rear Passenger Head Protection
good
Rear Passenger Head and Neck
good
Rear Passenger Pelvis/Leg
good
Rear Passenger Torso
good
Structure/safety cage
acceptable
Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) is a nonprofit research and communications organization funded by auto insurers.

Manufacturer Warranties

Backed by Chrysler
New Car Program Benefits
  • Bumper-to-Bumper

    36 months / 36,000 miles

  • Powertrain

    60 months / 100,000 miles

  • Roadside Assistance

    36 months / 36,000 miles

Certified Pre-Owned Program Benefits
  • Maximum Age/Mileage

    5 model years or newer/less than 75,000 miles.

  • Basic Warranty Terms

    3 months/3,000 miles

  • Powertrain warranty

    7 years/100,000 miles

  • Dealer Certification Required

    125-point inspection

  • Roadside Assistance

    Yes

  • View All Program Details

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Cars.com Car Seat Check

Certified child passenger safety technicians conduct hands-on tests of a car’s Latch system and check the vehicle’s ability to accommodate different types of car seats. The Town & Country received the following grades on a scale of A-F.*
* This score may not apply to all trims, especially for vehicles with multiple body styles that affect the space and design of the seating.

Warranty FAQs

What is a Bumper-to-Bumper warranty?

Often called a basic warranty or new-vehicle warranty, a bumper-to-bumper policy covers components like air conditioning, audio systems, vehicle sensors, fuel systems and major electrical components. Most policies exclude regular maintenance like fluid top offs and oil changes, but a few brands have separate free-maintenance provisions, and those that do offer them is slowly rising. Bumper-to-bumper warranties typically expire faster than powertrain warranties.

What is a Powertrain warranty?

Don't be misled a 10-year or 100,000-mile powertrain warranty doesn't promise a decade of free repairs for your car. It typically covers just the engine and transmission, along with any other moving parts that lead to the wheels, like the driveshaft and constant velocity joints. Some automakers also bundle seat belts and airbags into their powertrain warranties. With a few exceptions, powertrain warranties don't cover regular maintenance like engine tuneups and tire rotations.

What is included in Roadside Assistance?

Some automakers include roadside assistance with their bumper-to-bumper or powertrain warranties, while others have separate policies. These programs cover anything from flat-tire changes and locksmith services to jump-starts and towing. Few reimburse incidental costs like motel rooms (if you have to wait for repairs).

What other services could be included in a warranty?

Some automakers include free scheduled maintenance for items such as oil changes, air filters and tire rotations. Some include consumables including brake pads and windshield wipers; others do not. They are typically for the first couple of years of ownership of a new car.

What does CPO mean?

A certified pre-owned or CPO car has been inspected to meet minimum quality standards and typically includes some type of warranty. While dealers and third parties certify cars, the gold standard is an automaker-certified vehicle that provides a factory-backed warranty, often extending the original coverage. Vehicles must be in excellent condition and have low miles and wear to be certified, which is why off-lease vehicles feed many CPO programs.

See also the latest CPO incentives by automaker