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2004 Ford Mustang

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5
Photos
Coupe
4 Seats
20-24 MPG
(Combined)
Key specs of the base trim
 — 
Compare 7 trims

Overview

Is this the car for you?

The Good

  • Performance of the GT
  • RWD handling in the GT
  • Ride comfort on smooth roads
  • Quietness of V-6

The Bad

  • Slippery-weather traction
  • Final year in this form
  • Backseat space
  • Manual-gearbox operation

What to Know

about the 2004 Ford Mustang
  • Choice of V-6 or V-8
  • Coupe and convertible body styles
  • RWD layout
  • Mach 1 and Cobra models
  • Color-shifting paint package for Cobra trim

Our Take

from the Cars.com expert editorial team

Vehicle Overview
Ford’s “pony car” celebrates its 40th anniversary in 2004, and all models wear special commemorative front-fender badging. A limited-edition 40th Anniversary Package that features performance-oriented upgrades and Arizona Beige stripes on the hood, lower rockers and deck lid is available.

Last year saw the return of the limited-production Mach 1 Mustang, which first debuted in 1969. Continuing into 2004, the current version has a functional “shaker” scoop on its hood as well as an air-dam extension and low-gloss black striping above the rocker moldings. Not only has the Mach 1’s body been lowered by half an inch, but its 4.6-liter V-8 engine is also good for 305 horsepower. An SVT version of the Mustang called the Mustang Cobra is also available. (Skip to details on the: SVT Mustang Cobra)

Coupes and convertibles are available. Regular V-6 Mustangs come in standard, Deluxe and Premium trim levels, while the GT V-8 is offered in Deluxe and Premium levels.

Ford’s Mustang is the last of the traditional rear-wheel-drive pony cars. At the 2004 North American International Auto Show, Ford introduced a brand-new Mustang that will go on sale as a 2005 model-year vehicle.


Exterior
Even in the tamer, V-6-powered trim levels, the Mustang flaunts a sporty appearance with its long hood and short rear deck. Several styling cues, including the hood scoop, side scoops and a grille that contains a pony emblem in a chrome corral, are evoluti...
Vehicle Overview
Ford’s “pony car” celebrates its 40th anniversary in 2004, and all models wear special commemorative front-fender badging. A limited-edition 40th Anniversary Package that features performance-oriented upgrades and Arizona Beige stripes on the hood, lower rockers and deck lid is available.

Last year saw the return of the limited-production Mach 1 Mustang, which first debuted in 1969. Continuing into 2004, the current version has a functional “shaker” scoop on its hood as well as an air-dam extension and low-gloss black striping above the rocker moldings. Not only has the Mach 1’s body been lowered by half an inch, but its 4.6-liter V-8 engine is also good for 305 horsepower. An SVT version of the Mustang called the Mustang Cobra is also available. (Skip to details on the: SVT Mustang Cobra)

Coupes and convertibles are available. Regular V-6 Mustangs come in standard, Deluxe and Premium trim levels, while the GT V-8 is offered in Deluxe and Premium levels.

Ford’s Mustang is the last of the traditional rear-wheel-drive pony cars. At the 2004 North American International Auto Show, Ford introduced a brand-new Mustang that will go on sale as a 2005 model-year vehicle.


Exterior
Even in the tamer, V-6-powered trim levels, the Mustang flaunts a sporty appearance with its long hood and short rear deck. Several styling cues, including the hood scoop, side scoops and a grille that contains a pony emblem in a chrome corral, are evolutions of the Mustang’s appearance from more than three decades ago. Convertibles have a glass back window and a power-operated top that stows beneath a hard boot.

Interior
Mustangs seat four occupants on front bucket seats and a split, folding rear seat; the seatback is fixed in convertibles. Seating is reasonably upright for easy entry and exit, but the doors demand considerable space in order to be fully opened. Cargo volumes are a modest 10.9 cubic feet in the coupe and 7.7 cubic feet in convertible models.

Under the Hood
Base-model Mustangs carry a 190-hp, 3.8-liter V-6 engine, while the GT gets a 4.6-liter single-overhead-cam V-8 rated at 260 hp. Either engine can team with a five-speed-manual transmission or an optional four-speed automatic. With the manual shift, the Mach 1’s 4.6-liter V-8 generates 305 hp at 5,800 rpm and 320 pounds-feet of torque at 4,200 rpm. A limited-slip rear axle is standard on GT models.

Safety
All-disc antilock brakes are standard on the Mach 1 and SVT Mustang Cobra and optional on other models. Side-impact airbags are not available.

Driving Impressions
Whether it packs a V-6 or V-8 engine, the Mustang is a strong performer, yet it’s easy enough to live with for everyday driving due to its relatively smooth ride and quiet operation.

Handling is another bonus, especially when driving a GT. Steering demands moderate effort, but you get firm, secure responses and a tenacious grip through curves. The GT’s V-8 delivers a satisfying exhaust sound. Ford’s five-speed-manual gearbox isn’t always the easiest to shift, and some of them have made a clanking sound.


Related Model: SVT Mustang Cobra
Revived as a 2003 model, the SVT Mustang Cobra dishes out more power than any of its predecessors — 390 hp at 6,000 rpm and 390 pounds-feet of torque at 3,500 rpm. The extra horsepower on the current version results from an Eaton Roots-type supercharger that features a water-to-air intercooler for the 4.6-liter V-8 engine. A six-speed-manual transmission sends all the Cobra’s vigor to the back wheels.

Coupe and convertible body styles are available, but the soft-top Cobra has its own suspension tuning. The Cobra is capable of accelerating from zero to 60 mph in 4.9 seconds.

For 2004, 1,000 examples of a limited-edition Mystichrome Appearance Package, which features color-shifting body paint, will be produced. Two new regular colors are available: Screaming Yellow and Competition Orange. Ford halted the production of all SVT products midway through the model year, but a new group is expected in a year or so. Back to top

Consumer Reviews

What drivers are saying

4.6
88 reviews — Read All reviews
Exterior Styling
(4.8)
Performance
(4.7)
Interior Design
(4.2)
Comfort
(4.1)
Reliability
(4.7)
Value For The Money
(4.7)

Read reviews that mention:

(5.0)

Dream Car

by Gcarr10 from Langhorne, PA on October 8, 2018

My dream car. The really older models are too small for me as I?m a big guy, but other than that the car is perfect. Read full review

(5.0)

I'm 75 so it's not me that's turning heads !

by Geezer Guy from Warwick, RI on August 21, 2018

The car is a pleasure to drive and be seen in. It's a head turner for sure and I show it regularly. Many folks like their photo taken in it. Very reliable. Lots of pep. Squats and gits when you ask it ... Read full review

Safety

Recalls and crash tests

Recalls

The 2004 Ford Mustang currently has 6 recalls


Crash and Rollover Test Ratings

The 2004 Ford Mustang has not been tested.

Latest 2004 Mustang Stories

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Cars.com Car Seat Check

Certified child passenger safety technicians conduct hands-on tests of a car’s Latch system and check the vehicle’s ability to accommodate different types of car seats. The Mustang received the following grades on a scale of A-F.*
* This score may not apply to all trims, especially for vehicles with multiple body styles that affect the space and design of the seating.

Warranty FAQs

What is a Bumper-to-Bumper warranty?

Often called a basic warranty or new-vehicle warranty, a bumper-to-bumper policy covers components like air conditioning, audio systems, vehicle sensors, fuel systems and major electrical components. Most policies exclude regular maintenance like fluid top offs and oil changes, but a few brands have separate free-maintenance provisions, and those that do offer them is slowly rising. Bumper-to-bumper warranties typically expire faster than powertrain warranties.

What is a Powertrain warranty?

Don't be misled a 10-year or 100,000-mile powertrain warranty doesn't promise a decade of free repairs for your car. It typically covers just the engine and transmission, along with any other moving parts that lead to the wheels, like the driveshaft and constant velocity joints. Some automakers also bundle seat belts and airbags into their powertrain warranties. With a few exceptions, powertrain warranties don't cover regular maintenance like engine tuneups and tire rotations.

What is included in Roadside Assistance?

Some automakers include roadside assistance with their bumper-to-bumper or powertrain warranties, while others have separate policies. These programs cover anything from flat-tire changes and locksmith services to jump-starts and towing. Few reimburse incidental costs like motel rooms (if you have to wait for repairs).

What other services could be included in a warranty?

Some automakers include free scheduled maintenance for items such as oil changes, air filters and tire rotations. Some include consumables including brake pads and windshield wipers; others do not. They are typically for the first couple of years of ownership of a new car.

What does CPO mean?

A certified pre-owned or CPO car has been inspected to meet minimum quality standards and typically includes some type of warranty. While dealers and third parties certify cars, the gold standard is an automaker-certified vehicle that provides a factory-backed warranty, often extending the original coverage. Vehicles must be in excellent condition and have low miles and wear to be certified, which is why off-lease vehicles feed many CPO programs.

See also the latest CPO incentives by automaker