2001 Lincoln Town Car

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Key Specs
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Overview
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Key Specs

of the 2001 Lincoln Town Car. Base trim shown.

  • Body Type:
  • Combined MPG:
    21 Combined MPG
  • Engine:
    220-hp, 4.6-liter V-8 (regular gas)
  • Drivetrain:
    Rear-wheel Drive
  • Transmission:
    4-speed automatic w/OD
  • View more specs

2001 Lincoln Town Car Overview

By Cars.com Editors
Vehicle Overview
This traditional rear-drive luxury sedan embodies the image most consumers have of Lincoln, an image the company is trying to change with models like the LS sedan and Navigator sport utility vehicle.

However, the Town Car remains Lincoln’s best-selling model by far, so don’t look for it to disappear soon. Its main audiences are older buyers and limousine companies, and it is due for a face-lift for 2002. Lincoln says it will build the Town Car as long as there is sufficient demand.

New options for the Town Car this year center on nontraditional hardware and software. Lincoln offers a hands-free, voice-activated cellular phone that later in the year will allow links to 24-hour emergency service and the Internet for e-mail, stock quotes, news and weather.

All 2001 Lincolns also get free scheduled maintenance for the first three years or 36,000 miles.



Exterior
Lincoln added a stretched version of the Town Car last spring, tacking on 6 inches to the wheelbase and overall length. The standard-size model rides a 118-inch wheelbase and is 215 inches overall — 8 inches longer than the front-drive Cadillac DeVille, its archrival.

The Town Car is built on the same platform used for the Ford Crown Victoria and Mercury Grand Marquis but is longer and has different styling.



Interior
With its long wheelbase and wide interior, the Town Car provides ample room for occupants to lounge — at least the ones in the outboard seats. The middle seats straddle the drivesh...
Vehicle Overview
This traditional rear-drive luxury sedan embodies the image most consumers have of Lincoln, an image the company is trying to change with models like the LS sedan and Navigator sport utility vehicle.

However, the Town Car remains Lincoln’s best-selling model by far, so don’t look for it to disappear soon. Its main audiences are older buyers and limousine companies, and it is due for a face-lift for 2002. Lincoln says it will build the Town Car as long as there is sufficient demand.

New options for the Town Car this year center on nontraditional hardware and software. Lincoln offers a hands-free, voice-activated cellular phone that later in the year will allow links to 24-hour emergency service and the Internet for e-mail, stock quotes, news and weather.

All 2001 Lincolns also get free scheduled maintenance for the first three years or 36,000 miles.



Exterior
Lincoln added a stretched version of the Town Car last spring, tacking on 6 inches to the wheelbase and overall length. The standard-size model rides a 118-inch wheelbase and is 215 inches overall — 8 inches longer than the front-drive Cadillac DeVille, its archrival.

The Town Car is built on the same platform used for the Ford Crown Victoria and Mercury Grand Marquis but is longer and has different styling.



Interior
With its long wheelbase and wide interior, the Town Car provides ample room for occupants to lounge — at least the ones in the outboard seats. The middle seats straddle the driveshaft tunnel and have less legroom and comfort than other positions. The split, front bench seat and wide rear bench coddle the outboard passengers by comparison.

Wide, tall doors make it easy to get in and out, and all models come with standard leather upholstery and lavish amounts of comfort and convenience features. Power-adjustable brake and accelerator pedals with a 3-inch range are now standard.

The trunk holds 20.6 cubic feet of luggage, though most of that comes from a deep center well that makes it awkward to load and unload because the spare tire hangs over the forward end.



Under the Hood
A 4.6-liter V-8 engine and four-speed automatic transmission are standard on all models. On the Executive and Signature models, horsepower increases by 20 this year to 220. Dual exhausts are standard on the top-shelf Cartier model and included with the Touring Package available for the Signature, and horsepower increases by 20 to 235. Standard safety features include side-impact airbags for the front seats, antilock brakes and traction control.



Driving Impressions
The Town Car lost a little size and weight when it was redesigned for 1998 and gained some athletic ability. It is still a large, cushy, traditional American luxury car, but it is far more agile and manageable than previous versions. The Cadillac DeVille feels more refined and powerful, so those who are interested should compare before they decide.

 
Reported by Rick Popely  for cars.com
From the cars.com 2001 Buying Guide

Latest 2001 Town Car Stories

Consumer Reviews

Exterior Styling
(4.4)
Performance
(4.4)
Interior Design
(4.6)
Comfort
(4.6)
Reliability
(4.5)
Value For The Money
(4.6)

What Drivers Are Saying

(5.0)

most reliable

by kay on July 31, 2017

Its like steping into a dream this car is a quite storm.the dashboard is well lite for those of us with vision problems the sound system is amazing front and back just the right touch the seats are ... Read full review

(5.0)

Tank with two sofas in it

by MycarisnamedBigRuny on July 30, 2017

I bought this car from a friend and it's by far the best investment I've made in a while. Almost 18 years old and runs like a new car. Read full review

Safety & Recalls

Recalls

The 2001 Lincoln Town Car currently has 6 recalls

Crash and Rollover Test Ratings

The 2001 Lincoln Town Car has not been tested.

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Cars.com Car Seat Check

Certified child passenger safety technicians conduct hands-on tests of a car’s Latch system and check the vehicle’s ability to accommodate different types of car seats. The Town Car received the following grades on a scale of A-F.*
* This score may not apply to all trims, especially for vehicles with multiple body styles that affect the space and design of the seating.

Warranty FAQs

What is a Bumper-to-Bumper warranty?

Often called a basic warranty or new-vehicle warranty, a bumper-to-bumper policy covers components like air conditioning, audio systems, vehicle sensors, fuel systems and major electrical components. Most policies exclude regular maintenance like fluid top offs and oil changes, but a few brands have separate free-maintenance provisions, and those that do offer them is slowly rising. Bumper-to-bumper warranties typically expire faster than powertrain warranties.

What is a Powertrain warranty?

Don't be misled a 10-year or 100,000-mile powertrain warranty doesn't promise a decade of free repairs for your car. It typically covers just the engine and transmission, along with any other moving parts that lead to the wheels, like the driveshaft and constant velocity joints. Some automakers also bundle seat belts and airbags into their powertrain warranties. With a few exceptions, powertrain warranties don't cover regular maintenance like engine tuneups and tire rotations.

What is included in Roadside Assistance?

Some automakers include roadside assistance with their bumper-to-bumper or powertrain warranties, while others have separate policies. These programs cover anything from flat-tire changes and locksmith services to jump-starts and towing. Few reimburse incidental costs like motel rooms (if you have to wait for repairs).

What other services could be included in a warranty?

Some automakers include free scheduled maintenance for items such as oil changes, air filters and tire rotations. Some include consumables including brake pads and windshield wipers; others do not. They are typically for the first couple of years of ownership of a new car.

What does CPO mean?

A certified pre-owned or CPO car has been inspected to meet minimum quality standards and typically includes some type of warranty. While dealers and third parties certify cars, the gold standard is an automaker-certified vehicle that provides a factory-backed warranty, often extending the original coverage. Vehicles must be in excellent condition and have low miles and wear to be certified, which is why off-lease vehicles feed many CPO programs.

See also the latest CPO incentives by automaker