Best Bet
  • (4.4) 111 reviews
  • MSRP: $1,477–$19,297
  • Body Style: Coupe
  • Combined MPG: 21-23
  • Engine: 300-hp, 4.6-liter V-8 (regular gas)
  • Drivetrain: Rear-wheel Drive
2006 Ford Mustang

Our Take on the Latest Model 2006 Ford Mustang

What We Don't Like

  • V6 automatic disappointing
  • No side-curtain airbag option
  • No light, storage or cupholders in backseat
  • Optional gauges too dim in sunlight
  • Manual gearshift slightly balky
  • Poor rear visibility

Notable Features

  • Plenty of power for the money (GT)
  • Five-speed manual or automatic
  • Coupe or convertible body styles
  • Aluminum trim option
  • Selectable gauge-lighting option
  • New Pony Package for 2006

2006 Ford Mustang Reviews

Vehicle Overview
After four decades on the market, Ford's sportiest model — the last traditional rear-wheel-drive "pony car" — entered a new generation for 2005.

Styling cues are borrowed from Mustangs of the 1960s, and Ford calls the new Mustang "more modern, more livable and safer," and says it's managed that without losing its "street swagger." The automaker said the Mustang's "menacing sharklike nose imparts an attitude not seen since the 1967 model."

Two engines are available: a 210 horsepower V-6 and a 300-hp V-8 for the Mustang GT. "The new Mustang is pure American muscle," said J Mays, Ford's vice president of design. A convertible is also offered.

A new Pony Package for 2006 gives V-6 models a GT-inspired suspension with larger wheels and tires, antilock brakes, traction control and a custom grille with fog lamps. The GT is available with four different wheel and tire combinations, including two new 18-inch setups complemented by unique suspension tuning.


Exterior
In its modern form, the Mustang's wheels are pushed to the corners, but the car's signature long hood and short deck remain. Coupes feature a classic fastback profile.

Styling touches from the past include C-scoops in the sides, tri-bar taillamps and a "galloping horse" badge within the forward-leaning grille. Jeweled round headlights sit in trapezoidal housings. A full-length accent line culminates in a "C-scoop" shape just behind the door, which incorporates a small triangular window. Aluminum-spoked wheels hold 17-inch tires on the GT, but V-6 Mustangs get 16-inch rubber.


Interior
Mustangs seat four occupants on front and rear bucket seats. An available color-configurable instrument panel can display more than 125 background colors. Chrome-ringed air vents align with large barrel-style gauges. The three-spoke steering wheel has a black hub with the Mustang horse and tri-color logo.

Standard equipment includes keyless entry, interval wipers, a heated rear window, and power windows, locks and mirrors. A CD player is standard, but the GT Premium flaunts its Shaker 500 audio system. Trunk space is 13.1 cubic feet in the coupe.


Under the Hood
Ford's 4.0-liter V-6 produces 210 hp. A 4.6-liter all-aluminum V-8 in the GT pumps out 300 hp and 320 pounds-feet of torque. Both engines run on regular gasoline and work with either a five-speed-manual transmission or an optional five-speed automatic.

Safety
Side-impact airbags are optional. Antilock brakes are standard on the GT and optional on V-6 models.

Driving Impressions
The latest Mustang is more refined than its predecessor. Steering has a satisfying, confident feel that's especially appealing on twisty roads.

Suspension differences between the two models aren't dramatic, but the GT is considerably more sure-footed. Its ride is no rougher, and the overall experience is more civilized. The GT's steering response is more agreeable, too — well-behaved through curves, with little correction needed on straightaways.

Acceleration with the V-6 isn't so enthusiastic at startup, though it's better for passing and merging. Performance is vigorous with the V-8. Exhaust noise from the V-8 can be intrusive, but only when accelerating hard.

Manual-shift GTs almost seem like a different vehicle, with a unique and omnipresent exhaust sound. The gearshift position is good, but its action is a tad balky.


Consumer Reviews

4.4

Average based on 111 reviews

Write a Review

most fun car ive owned

by mustangdriver from tulsa, ok on November 12, 2017

love driving car get a lot of looks driving a bright red sports car, has a lot of pep for an older car,

Read All Consumer Reviews

10 Trims Available

Photo of undefined
Wondering which configuration is right for you?
Our 2006 Ford Mustang trim comparison will help you decide.
 

Ford Mustang Articles

2006 Ford Mustang Safety Ratings

Crash-Test Reports

Recalls

There are currently 7 recalls for this car.


Safety defects and recalls are relatively common. Stay informed and know what to do ahead of time.

Safety defects and recalls explained

Service & Repair

Estimated Service & Repair cost: $4,400 per year.

Save on maintenance costs and do your own repairs.

Warranty Coverage

What you should get in your warranty can be confusing. Make sure you are informed.

Learn More About Warranties

Warranties Explained

Bumper-to-Bumper

Often called a basic warranty or new-vehicle warranty, a bumper-to-bumper policy covers components like air conditioning, audio systems, vehicle sensors, fuel systems and major electrical components. Most policies exclude regular maintenance like fluid top offs and oil changes, but a few brands have separate free-maintenance provisions, and those that do offer them is slowly rising. Bumper-to-bumper warranties typically expire faster than powertrain warranties.

Powertrain

Don't be misled a 10-year or 100,000-mile powertrain warranty doesn't promise a decade of free repairs for your car. It typically covers just the engine and transmission, along with any other moving parts that lead to the wheels, like the driveshaft and constant velocity joints. Some automakers also bundle seat belts and airbags into their powertrain warranties. With a few exceptions, powertrain warranties don't cover regular maintenance like engine tuneups and tire rotations.

Roadside Assistance

Some automakers include roadside assistance with their bumper-to-bumper or powertrain warranties, while others have separate policies. These programs cover anything from flat-tire changes and locksmith services to jump-starts and towing. Few reimburse incidental costs like motel rooms (if you have to wait for repairs).

Free Scheduled Maintenance

Some automakers include free scheduled maintenance for items such as oil changes, air filters and tire rotations. Some include consumables including brake pads and windshield wipers; others do not. They are typically for the first couple of years of ownership of a new car.

Other Years