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2019 Toyota Camry

2019 Toyota Camry

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$14,222 — $40,234 NEW and USED
62
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Sedan
5 Seats
26-34 MPG
(Combined)
Key specs of the base trim
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2019 Toyota Camry Review

from the Cars.com expert editorial team

By Kelsey Mays

The verdict: Fresh off its 2018-model-year redesign, the Toyota Camry adds incremental improvements for 2019 to remain a solid choice among mid-size sedans — if you’re willing to spend enough.

Versus the competition: The Camry stands out as a premium choice that holds its own against redesigned rivals, especially if you pony up for a well-equipped version.

Consumers’ shift toward SUVs has blunted the Camry’s longstanding popularity, but it remains Toyota’s second-best seller behind only the RAV4 SUV. For 2019, Toyota offers the Camry sedan in five trim levels and two engines; compare the 2019 and 2018 Camry here. The most notable change for 2019 is the addition of Apple CarPlay, which you can now get retrofitted on a 2018 Camry. Android users, unfortunately, will find the Camry still missing Android Auto.

Cars.com covers the Camry Hybrid on a separate page; this review covers the non-hybrid 2019 Camry. We tested a well-equipped V-6 XSE this time around, but I’ll draw from a wide range of configurations we’ve tested over the past two model years — none more illustrative than a 2018 Camry we drove as part of a three-car comparison with the redesigned Honda Accord and Nissan Altima.

Mostly Fun, but Lag’s a Drag

Rather than going the route of the largely turbocharged mid-size class, Toyota doubled down on turbo-free engines with the Camry’s redesign. Its engines remain a 2.5-liter four-cylinder and a 3.5-liter V-6, though both have significant technological enhancements. The 203-...

The verdict: Fresh off its 2018-model-year redesign, the Toyota Camry adds incremental improvements for 2019 to remain a solid choice among mid-size sedans — if you’re willing to spend enough.

Versus the competition: The Camry stands out as a premium choice that holds its own against redesigned rivals, especially if you pony up for a well-equipped version.

Consumers’ shift toward SUVs has blunted the Camry’s longstanding popularity, but it remains Toyota’s second-best seller behind only the RAV4 SUV. For 2019, Toyota offers the Camry sedan in five trim levels and two engines; compare the 2019 and 2018 Camry here. The most notable change for 2019 is the addition of Apple CarPlay, which you can now get retrofitted on a 2018 Camry. Android users, unfortunately, will find the Camry still missing Android Auto.

Cars.com covers the Camry Hybrid on a separate page; this review covers the non-hybrid 2019 Camry. We tested a well-equipped V-6 XSE this time around, but I’ll draw from a wide range of configurations we’ve tested over the past two model years — none more illustrative than a 2018 Camry we drove as part of a three-car comparison with the redesigned Honda Accord and Nissan Altima.

Mostly Fun, but Lag’s a Drag  

Rather than going the route of the largely turbocharged mid-size class, Toyota doubled down on turbo-free engines with the Camry’s redesign. Its engines remain a 2.5-liter four-cylinder and a 3.5-liter V-6, though both have significant technological enhancements. The 203-horsepower four-cylinder is a bit noisy, but it delivers smooth, lively revving off the line, and it’s among the most potent base engines in this class. Unfortunately, responsiveness suffers once you’re in motion. Floor the pedal in a passing lane, and the Camry’s eight-speed automatic transmission delays too long before downshifting. We aren’t the only ones to notice: Our friends at “MotorWeek” observed the same hesitation in their long-term 2018 Camry, and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s website has dozens of consumer complaints on drivetrain lag in the 2018-2019 Camry.

Optional on the highest two trim levels, Toyota’s 301-hp, 3.5-liter V-6 is a beast. It’s easy to spin the front tires from a stop, and the fierce, quick revving will make you want to do it all over again at the next stoplight. The V-6 Camry easily ranks among the quickest sedans in its class in terms of raw power. Drivetrain lag while in motion persists — the V-6 also pairs with a recalcitrant eight-speed auto — but the extra surge after downshift helps make up for it.

Overall ride comfort with 18-inch wheels — the smallest diameter on any model we’ve driven — is a touch firmer than Camry faithful might like, but shock absorption and body control show a lot of polish. Lower trim levels offer 16- or 17-inch wheels and higher-profile tires, which may make things more comfortable. SE and XSE models have a sport-tuned suspension with 18- or 19-inch wheels, but even with the 19s the ride never beats you up; it’s firm but controlled. Toyota got this right.

The Camry’s steering is higher-effort than some rivals but far from a workout, and it reorients the car with assertive precision. I suspect zero Camry drivers will throw their car around hairpin turns or autocross courses, but its dynamics are mighty impressive. Camry shoppers, indulge me on this: Up against the Accord and Altima, the Camry exhibits less understeer when pushed hard; its nose tucks dutifully in line through all kinds of corners. At steady speeds on sweeping curves, the tail can even slide around a little bit — a degree of neutrality that’s rare among front-drive cars.

Better Tech, But Watch for Cost-Cutting

The Camry’s dashboard features a high shelf with lots of intertwining layers — a look many rivals have jettisoned in favor of lower dashboards and high-mounted touchscreens. The Camry’s screen — 7 or 8 inches depending on trim level — sits amid a hodgepodge of conventional buttons that lack much organization, but other controls are straightforward enough. Apple CarPlay is now standard, but the lack of Android Auto might be a deal-breaker for shoppers on the other side of the smartphone divide.

Keep an eye out for cost-cutting in lower trim levels: Penny-pinching was evident in the last mid-level Camry we tested — a 2018 SE — in the form of cheaper armrests and more hard-plastic door trim, especially in the rear seats. To some extent, such trim-level variances have become the norm across many mid-size sedans, but few make it as obvious as the Camry.

Pricier trim levels like the Camry XSE and XLE step it up with more soft-touch surfaces all around. Both also add leather upholstery, versus the cloth or vinyl (which Toyota calls SofTex) in lower trims. Other available features include a panoramic moonroof and heated front seats with dual power adjustments, including a height adjustment for the passenger. You can’t, however, get a heated steering wheel, heated rear seats or a memory driver’s seat — all features available among certain competitors. Cooled front seats are also unavailable, but Toyota says it will offer them on higher trims for 2020.

Space for People and Stuff

Taller drivers should skip the Camry’s optional moonroof, which reduces headroom by nearly an inch. As such, my 6-foot frame needed a lower seating position than I wanted. Headroom is fine in the backseat, but it comes at the expense of seating position, which is low enough to leave some passengers’ knees uncomfortably elevated. Overall legroom is modest, though not enough to diminish the Camry’s top scores in our evaluation of child-safety seat accommodations, which you can read about in the 2019 Toyota Camry Car Seat Check.

In-cabin storage areas are sufficient, though I wish moonroof-equipped models didn’t delete the otherwise standard sunglasses holder. Toyota quotes 15.1 cubic feet of trunk space in all but the base trim level, the Camry L, which has 14.1 cubic feet. We’ve found such specs unreliable, though, and our real-world measurements last year found 14.9 cubic feet in a Camry XLE. That’s a little more than we measured in the Altima (14.6 cubic feet) but notably short of the Accord (15.8 cubic feet). Another shortcoming: With the seats folded down, the Camry’s pass-through is both short and narrow — a limitation for oversized cargo. IKEA shoppers, beware.

Safety & Autonomy

The 2019 Camry has excellent crash-test scores from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, but the sedan’s designation as a Top Safety Pick Plus — IIHS’ highest award — applies only to upper trim levels of the Camry Hybrid because it has top-rated headlights. Those lights aren’t available on the non-hybrid Camry, which has separate headlights in two configurations. Both configurations earn an IIHS rating of acceptable (out of poor, marginal, acceptable and good), which disqualifies the non-hybrid sedan from award status. That said, base headlight configurations in many rivals earn poor or marginal scores; Toyota’s aren’t too shabby.

Standard equipment on the Camry includes automatic emergency braking with pedestrian detection, lane departure warning with steering assist, and automatic high-beam lights. Adaptive cruise control that works at higher speeds is also standard; higher trim levels get adaptive cruise that works all the way to a stop, though some editors found the system too conservative in its following distances. Blind-spot warning is optional, but lane-centering steering — a feature proliferating in this class and among a few other Toyota models — is not.

Pricing, Value

The Camry’s base trim level, the L ($25,050 including destination), is virtually unavailable in Cars.com dealer inventory, so the cheapest example you’ll likely find is the LE. Fortunately it’s only another $505, and it gets alloy wheels, a power driver’s seat and a few other minor upgrades. At the other end of the spectrum, pricing on a top trim with factory options can top out close to $40,000. That’s sure to elicit some sticker shock, as many rivals top out a few thousand less.

Last year’s third-place finish for a 2018 Camry versus the Accord and Altima came by the slimmest of margins, and the addition of Apple CarPlay alone (now available) might have been enough to change its rank. Even so, the Camry would likely have finished on the podium among the full class of mid-size sedans, a group that’s 10 players strong as of 2019. If you’re shopping the class, Toyota’s mainstay is a must-drive.

Cars.com’s Editorial department is your source for automotive news and reviews. In line with Cars.com’s long-standing ethics policy, editors and reviewers don’t accept gifts or free trips from automakers. The Editorial department is independent of Cars.com’s advertising, sales and sponsored content departments.

Consumer Reviews

What drivers are saying

4.7
276 reviews — Read All reviews
Exterior Styling
(4.9)
Performance
(4.5)
Interior Design
(4.5)
Comfort
(4.8)
Reliability
(4.5)
Value For The Money
(4.7)

Read reviews that mention:

(5.0)

Excellent value for price

by Noyazki from Charlotte, NC on July 25, 2020

You have all what you need in a car. Sporty look, Comfortable Drive, Safety Features, Reliable Engine and Low maintenance. Very spacious interior with Apple Car Play for your Phone Apps to connect. Read full review

(5.0)

So far we love it.

by nay51756 from Nelliston N.Y. on July 24, 2020

Lots of room, quiet and rides very well.The more I drive it the more I like it.We were all Honda but now that they are using turbo's and CVT trans.We decided on Toyota .We tend to keep cars way to ... Read full review

Safety

Recalls and crash tests

Recalls

The 2019 Toyota Camry currently has 4 recalls


Crash and Rollover Test Ratings

Based on 2019 Toyota Camry L

IIHS rates vehicles good, acceptable, marginal, or poor.

Child Seat Anchors (Latch)

Ease of Use
good

Crash Avoidance and Mitigation

Front Crash Prevention
superior

Head Restraints and Seats

Dynamic Rating
good
Overall Rear
good
Seat Head/Restraint Geometry
good

Headlights

Overall Rating
acceptable

Moderate overlap front

Chest
good
Head/Neck
good
Left Leg/Foot
good
Overall Front
good
Restraints
good
Right Leg/Foot
good
Structure/safety cage
good

Other

Roof Strength
good

Side

Driver Head Protection
good
Driver Head and Neck
good
Driver Pelvis/Leg
good
Driver Torso
good
Overall Side
good
Rear Passenger Head Protection
good
Rear Passenger Head and Neck
good
Rear Passenger Pelvis/Leg
good
Rear Passenger Torso
good
Structure/safety cage
good

Small Overlap Front - Driver Side

Chest
good
Head/Neck
good
Hip/Thigh
good
Lower Leg/Foot
good
Overall Evaluation
good
Restraints and Dummy Kinematics
good
Structure and Safety Cage
good

Small Overlap Front - Passenger Side

Overall Evaluation
good
Structure and Safety Cage
good

Small Overlap Front - Passenger Side - Driver Injury Measures

Chest
good
Head/Neck
good
Hip/Thigh
good
Lower Leg/Foot
good
Restraints and Dummy Kinematics
good

Small Overlap Front - Passenger Side - Passenger Injury Measures

Chest
good
Head/Neck
good
Hip/Thigh
good
Lower Leg/Foot
good
Restraints and Dummy Kinematics
acceptable
Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) is a nonprofit research and communications organization funded by auto insurers.

Warranty

New car and certified pre-owned programs by Toyota

New Car Program Benefits

  • Bumper-to-Bumper

    36 months / 36,000 miles

  • Powertrain

    60 months / 60,000 miles

  • Roadside Assistance

    24 months / unlimited distance

Certified Pre-Owned Program Benefits

Latest 2019 Camry Stories

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Cars.com Car Seat Check

Certified child passenger safety technicians conduct hands-on tests of a car’s Latch system and check the vehicle’s ability to accommodate different types of car seats. The Camry received the following grades on a scale of A-F.*

Latch or Latch system

A

Infant seat

A

Forward-facing convertible

(second row)

A

Rear-facing convertible

A

Booster

(second row)

A
* This score may not apply to all trims, especially for vehicles with multiple body styles that affect the space and design of the seating.
For complete details,

Warranty FAQs

What is a Bumper-to-Bumper warranty?

Often called a basic warranty or new-vehicle warranty, a bumper-to-bumper policy covers components like air conditioning, audio systems, vehicle sensors, fuel systems and major electrical components. Most policies exclude regular maintenance like fluid top offs and oil changes, but a few brands have separate free-maintenance provisions, and those that do offer them is slowly rising. Bumper-to-bumper warranties typically expire faster than powertrain warranties.

What is a Powertrain warranty?

Don't be misled a 10-year or 100,000-mile powertrain warranty doesn't promise a decade of free repairs for your car. It typically covers just the engine and transmission, along with any other moving parts that lead to the wheels, like the driveshaft and constant velocity joints. Some automakers also bundle seat belts and airbags into their powertrain warranties. With a few exceptions, powertrain warranties don't cover regular maintenance like engine tuneups and tire rotations.

What is included in Roadside Assistance?

Some automakers include roadside assistance with their bumper-to-bumper or powertrain warranties, while others have separate policies. These programs cover anything from flat-tire changes and locksmith services to jump-starts and towing. Few reimburse incidental costs like motel rooms (if you have to wait for repairs).

What other services could be included in a warranty?

Some automakers include free scheduled maintenance for items such as oil changes, air filters and tire rotations. Some include consumables including brake pads and windshield wipers; others do not. They are typically for the first couple of years of ownership of a new car.

What does CPO mean?

A certified pre-owned or CPO car has been inspected to meet minimum quality standards and typically includes some type of warranty. While dealers and third parties certify cars, the gold standard is an automaker-certified vehicle that provides a factory-backed warranty, often extending the original coverage. Vehicles must be in excellent condition and have low miles and wear to be certified, which is why off-lease vehicles feed many CPO programs.

See also the latest CPO incentives by automaker

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*MSRP and Invoice prices displayed are for educational purposes only, do not reflect the actual selling price of a particular vehicle, and do not include applicable gas taxes or destination charges.