View Local Inventory
Save

2017 Ford Expedition

2017 Ford Expedition

Change year or vehicle
$18,459 — $41,055 USED
8
Photos
SUV
7-8 Seats
17-18 MPG
(Combined)
Key specs of the base trim
 — 
Compare 4 trims

Overview

Is this the car for you?

The Good

  • Interior space
  • Choice of regular or extended length
  • Power-folding third row available

The Bad

  • Interior plastics feel cheap
  • Disappointing fuel economy
2017 Ford Expedition exterior side view

What to Know

about the 2017 Ford Expedition
  • New Limited Appearance Package available
  • Full-size SUV seats up to eight
  • Regular- and long-wheelbase versions offered
  • Rear- or four-wheel drive
  • Adaptive suspension available
  • 9,200-pound maximum towing capacity

We’re looking for the best deals on a Ford near you…

Are you looking for more listings?

Change location

Please enter a valid 5-digit ZIP code.

Search Again

— OR —

Sign up for listing notifications

Sign Up

2017 Ford Expedition Review

from the Cars.com expert editorial team

By Aaron Bragman

CARS.COM — Big SUVs used to be all the rage — just as minivans replaced the family station wagon in the 1980s, so too did big SUVs do the same to those vans in the 1990s. But since then, the Great Recession and gas price shocks have returned big SUVs to their original place in the market — expensive specialty vehicles bought by people for whom only a big, multi-passenger vehicle that can tow significant amounts will do.

Related: 2018 Ford Expedition Review Video

The segment leader is the Chevrolet Tahoe and Suburban, and it wasn’t hard to figure out why — the main competitor, the Ford Expedition, hadn’t seen a major update in almost a decade. All that has changed — behold the behemoth, the all-new 2018 Ford Expedition, that’s aiming to knock the Chevy off its top truck throne.

Old-School Truck, New-School Materials

Like the old Expedition, the new one maintains a traditional truck-style body-on-frame construction. Underneath, the Expedition is an F-150 with an independent rear suspension instead of a solid live axle. This arrangement also allows for a lower loading floor in the cargo area that enables the third row to fold away completely — an advantage over the Chevy Tahoe’s style of seats.

Like the F-150, the body is now aluminum, but the weight difference isn’t that significant — Ford has added all kinds of equipment and sound insulation that offsets some of that aluminum construction benefit. The body looks slick, with a n...

CARS.COM — Big SUVs used to be all the rage — just as minivans replaced the family station wagon in the 1980s, so too did big SUVs do the same to those vans in the 1990s. But since then, the Great Recession and gas price shocks have returned big SUVs to their original place in the market — expensive specialty vehicles bought by people for whom only a big, multi-passenger vehicle that can tow significant amounts will do.

Related:  2018 Ford Expedition Review Video

 

 

 

 

The segment leader is the Chevrolet Tahoe and Suburban, and it wasn’t hard to figure out why — the main competitor, the Ford Expedition, hadn’t seen a major update in almost a decade. All that has changed — behold the behemoth, the all-new 2018 Ford Expedition, that’s aiming to knock the Chevy off its top truck throne.

Old-School Truck, New-School Materials

Like the old Expedition, the new one maintains a traditional truck-style body-on-frame construction. Underneath, the Expedition is an F-150 with an independent rear suspension instead of a solid live axle. This arrangement also allows for a lower loading floor in the cargo area that enables the third row to fold away completely — an advantage over the Chevy Tahoe’s style of seats.

 

 

 

 

Like the F-150, the body is now aluminum, but the weight difference isn’t that significant — Ford has added all kinds of equipment and sound insulation that offsets some of that aluminum construction benefit. The body looks slick, with a new and thoroughly modern appearance that is much more in keeping with the modern style of truck — high beltline, smaller windows and a chunkier style. It’s fresh, attractive and has a distinctly more aerodynamic look than the outgoing model.

Like the old Expedition, the new one is available in two lengths: Expedition and Expedition Max. The extra room doesn’t do anything for passenger space but does increase the available cargo area behind the third row, so you’re not forced to choose between those extra rear passengers and extra luggage capacity.

Old-Style Power, New-Style Engine

Powering the new Expedition is Ford’s ubiquitous twin-turbocharged 3.5-liter EcoBoost V-6. It’s a carryover engine from the last Expedition, so it shouldn’t be a surprise to not see a V-8 under the hood. It puts out a healthy 375 horsepower in most trim levels and 400 hp in the top Platinum trim. New to the setup is a standard 10-speed automatic transmission, available to either a rear-wheel-drive or all-wheel-drive configuration, and an electronic limited slip differential.

Fire up the V-6, and it sounds for all the world like a well-tuned turbo-diesel. Some of the engine’s noise is artificially generated (all that soundproofing would prevent you from hearing the engine, otherwise), but the sound that does come through is a fun mix of turbos whooshing and raspy exhaust. It sounds sufficiently butch for the truck it sits in.

 

 

 

 

I found driving it to be quite a pleasant surprise, as well — it more than adequately powers the Expedition in either regular-wheelbase or Max versions, and gets even more punchy when you twist the rotary drive mode selector into Sport. Climbing the canyons above Malibu, Calif., handling the tight, twisting sweepers, descending into quick switchbacks — the Expedition exuded confidence and stability. Sport mode tightens up the steering feedback, and changes both the throttle mapping and transmission shift points, making those twisties even easier to take. Nobody will confuse the Expedition for a Mustang, but it by no means embarrasses itself on high-speed, challenging roads.

Ride quality is also outstanding. Wheel sizes vary from 18- to 22-inch models depending on trim level and equipment. Higher-spec trims get an electronically adjustable suspension, but even lesser models’ suspensions provide a smooth, well-controlled ride. There are no crazy tippy body motions — it’s clear the Ford ride and handling engineers have done their homework. If you need an off-road rig, Ford’s got you covered here too: An FX4 package is available that brings underbody protection, a two-speed low-range transfer case, special tuning for the electronic limited-slip differential, Michelin Primacy tires on smaller wheels, off-road shocks, a heavy-duty radiator and unique badging.

The Expedition also tows like a champ. Hooked up to a 5,500-pound horse trailer, the Expedition Max I drove chugged up 6 percent inclines with ease, able to accelerate despite the load it was hauling. The 10-speed automatic is well-matched to this engine, holding gears on downhill grades that saved the Expedition’s brakes and maintained easy control. Trailer sway control comes with the heavy-duty towing package, as does Ford’s super-nifty Pro Trailer Backup Assist feature, which allows you to back a trailer up using a special control wheel on the dash and the backup cameras. It takes the guesswork and trial and error out of backing up a trailer, making even the newest novice look like a veteran trucker.

Better Inside, But Details Are Important

The interior looks as if it could have been lifted directly from the F-150, with all the pros and cons that entails. It’s spacious, with excellent outward visibility, but the front seats remain oddly short and become unsupportive over longer voyages. The backseats are high with plenty of room, and fore-and-aft sliding ability allows the two rear rows of passengers to negotiate legroom among themselves. The third row is actually usable for adults even when the second row is adjusted all the way rearward; put it forward a bit, and there really isn’t a bad seat in the house. The second row also tilts and slides forward at the touch of an electronic button, making ingress to the third row easier.

 

 

 

 

Material quality in the cabin is mixed, however. The F-150 isn’t known for having the best environment in the segment; it features plenty of hard plastic and seams between parts that simply don’t look like they flow together well. Some of this, like plastic mold flashing on the grab handles, can be chalked up to early build quality (our test units were some very early examples), but some of it is simply how it’s designed — it’s a pickup truck at heart that’s been given a healthy makeover, but it’s still a pickup truck in the ways that count. For a vehicle that can easily approach $90,000 in fully loaded Platinum trim or even top $70,000 in a well-equipped Limited model, this kind of detail becomes important. All the fancy quilted leather in the world doesn’t excuse the fact that other parts look cheap.

 

 

 

 

The Latest Tech

Thankfully, Ford loads you up with tech goodies for that kind of coin. The new platform means that a fully updated electronic architecture is present, chock full of gadgets that entertain (you can stream live TV to the entertainment system via Slingplayer and Sync 3, or even hook up a big screen TV for tailgating), some that keep you safe (all kinds of lane-keeping aids, steering aids, anti-collision aids, autonomous braking systems), and some that help you drive (like the aforementioned trailer backup assist). The high-end audio system is the new B&O Play brand, and it sounds fantastic. The entire experience in the Expedition is one of a significant upgrade, easily on par with the Chevy and GMC models, and surpassing them in flexibility, spaciousness, and amenities.

 

 

 

 

All This Utility Does Not Come Cheap

If you haven’t priced out a full-sized SUV in a while, you’d better be sitting down for this next part. The starting price for an Expedition XL 4×2 is $49,290 including destination and delivery, but you’ll never see one of those on a dealer lot — those are meant for fleet sales to utilities or city governments. Far more likely is the XLT trim, which starts at $52,890 in 4×2 trim. Specifying four-wheel drive adds between $3,100 and $3,200 to the price depending on trim level. Add in everything you can get, and you’re looking at an Expedition Max Platinum 4×4 that will stop short of 90 grand. For comparison’s sake, the new 2018 Lincoln Navigator starts around $73,000, and can top out around $100,000.

 

 

 

 

Still, this is easily competitive with vehicles like the Chevy Tahoe, Suburban and GMC Yukon. With buyers snapping up big SUVs in increasing numbers, Ford’s update to its big truck comes at the perfect time. That the truck is as good as it is should put Chevy on notice.

Cars.com’s Editorial department is your source for automotive news and reviews. In line with Cars.com’s long-standing ethics policy, editors and reviewers don’t accept gifts or free trips from automakers. The Editorial department is independent of Cars.com’s advertising, sales and sponsored content departments.

Consumer Reviews

What drivers are saying

4.7
71 reviews — Read All reviews
Exterior Styling
(4.6)
Performance
(4.7)
Interior Design
(4.6)
Comfort
(4.9)
Reliability
(4.6)
Value For The Money
(4.5)

Read reviews that mention:

(5.0)

Niccccce!!

by Redd from Ardmore OK on June 16, 2020

This SUV checked all the boxes: Nice ride, lots of room, looks good. It has multiple USB ports for charging and games. It’s also quiet ride with a lot of room which is great for long family trips. Read full review

(5.0)

Our 4wd Limo

by Checko from Winter Springs, Fl on April 23, 2020

This truck is comfortable, powerful & roomy. The third row can actually sit three adults with reasonable comfort. The Eco-boost V6 has plenty of power. Sufficient room behind 3rd row for cargo. Tahoe ... Read full review

Safety

Recalls and crash tests

Recalls

The 2017 Ford Expedition currently has 0 recalls


Crash and Rollover Test Ratings

Warranty

New car and certified pre-owned programs by Ford

New Car Program Benefits

  • Bumper-to-Bumper

    36 months / 36,000 miles

  • Powertrain

    60 months / 60,000 miles

  • Roadside Assistance

    60 months / 60,000 miles

Latest 2017 Expedition Stories

Change Year or Vehicle

0 Photos
0 / 0

Cars.com Car Seat Check

Certified child passenger safety technicians conduct hands-on tests of a car’s Latch system and check the vehicle’s ability to accommodate different types of car seats. The Expedition received the following grades on a scale of A-F.*
* This score may not apply to all trims, especially for vehicles with multiple body styles that affect the space and design of the seating.

Warranty FAQs

What is a Bumper-to-Bumper warranty?

Often called a basic warranty or new-vehicle warranty, a bumper-to-bumper policy covers components like air conditioning, audio systems, vehicle sensors, fuel systems and major electrical components. Most policies exclude regular maintenance like fluid top offs and oil changes, but a few brands have separate free-maintenance provisions, and those that do offer them is slowly rising. Bumper-to-bumper warranties typically expire faster than powertrain warranties.

What is a Powertrain warranty?

Don't be misled a 10-year or 100,000-mile powertrain warranty doesn't promise a decade of free repairs for your car. It typically covers just the engine and transmission, along with any other moving parts that lead to the wheels, like the driveshaft and constant velocity joints. Some automakers also bundle seat belts and airbags into their powertrain warranties. With a few exceptions, powertrain warranties don't cover regular maintenance like engine tuneups and tire rotations.

What is included in Roadside Assistance?

Some automakers include roadside assistance with their bumper-to-bumper or powertrain warranties, while others have separate policies. These programs cover anything from flat-tire changes and locksmith services to jump-starts and towing. Few reimburse incidental costs like motel rooms (if you have to wait for repairs).

What other services could be included in a warranty?

Some automakers include free scheduled maintenance for items such as oil changes, air filters and tire rotations. Some include consumables including brake pads and windshield wipers; others do not. They are typically for the first couple of years of ownership of a new car.

What does CPO mean?

A certified pre-owned or CPO car has been inspected to meet minimum quality standards and typically includes some type of warranty. While dealers and third parties certify cars, the gold standard is an automaker-certified vehicle that provides a factory-backed warranty, often extending the original coverage. Vehicles must be in excellent condition and have low miles and wear to be certified, which is why off-lease vehicles feed many CPO programs.

See also the latest CPO incentives by automaker

What's your location?

To find the best deals near you, please enter your ZIP code.