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2010 Buick Enclave

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$5,296 — $14,236 USED
20
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Sport Utility
7-8 Seats
19-20 MPG
(Combined)
Key specs of the base trim
 — 
Compare 3 trims

Overview

Is this the car for you?

The Good

  • Ride comfort
  • Capable engine
  • Cabin materials
  • Roomy first and second rows
  • Cargo room

The Bad

  • Low cushions for second and third rows
  • Cargo floor not continuous
  • Aging navigation graphics
  • Large turning circle
2010 Buick Enclave exterior side view

What to Know

about the 2010 Buick Enclave
  • 288-hp V-6
  • Seats seven or eight
  • Standard power liftgate
  • Available AWD
  • Related to Chevrolet Traverse, GMC Acadia

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2010 Buick Enclave Review

from the Cars.com expert editorial team

Cars.com's Kelsey Mays takes a look at the 2010 Buick Enclave. It competes with the Volvo XC90 and Acura MDX.

By Kelsey Mays

A lot of car shoppers link minivans with a terminal case of parental frumpiness, but when it comes to outright utility those vehicles have long beaten more socially acceptable crossovers, hands down. General Motors’ three-row crossovers — the Chevrolet Traverse, GMC Acadia and Buick Enclave — narrow that divide.

The Enclave combines outstanding utility with premium touches not usually found in such a roomy vehicle.

Introduced for 2008, the three-row Enclave (most expensive of the three GMs) seats up to eight. All-wheel drive is optional, and trim levels include the CX, CXL-1 and CXL-2. We tested a front-wheel-drive, seven-seat Enclave CXL-2. Click here to compare the 2010 Enclave with the 2009, or here to compare it with its Chevrolet and GMC cohorts.

Capable, Comfortable
In its first year on the market, the Enclave’s standard 3.6-liter V-6 felt so burdened by the crossover’s plus-sized weight — it comes in at nearly 5,000 pounds, much more than most minivans — it had a hard time generating good passing power. That’s not the case anymore. Aided by direct-injection technology, today’s Enclave has surprising pep. It moves out from stoplights and makes quick work of uphill on-ramps; the standard six-speed automatic upshifts smoothly and kicks down without too much delay.

With seven adults in our front-drive test vehicle, getting up to highway speeds took about all the power the Enclave could muster — but the V-6 was up to the task. All-wheel dr...

A lot of car shoppers link minivans with a terminal case of parental frumpiness, but when it comes to outright utility those vehicles have long beaten more socially acceptable crossovers, hands down. General Motors’ three-row crossovers — the Chevrolet Traverse, GMC Acadia and Buick Enclave — narrow that divide.

The Enclave combines outstanding utility with premium touches not usually found in such a roomy vehicle.

Introduced for 2008, the three-row Enclave (most expensive of the three GMs) seats up to eight. All-wheel drive is optional, and trim levels include the CX, CXL-1 and CXL-2. We tested a front-wheel-drive, seven-seat Enclave CXL-2. Click here to compare the 2010 Enclave with the 2009, or here to compare it with its Chevrolet and GMC cohorts.

Capable, Comfortable
In its first year on the market, the Enclave’s standard 3.6-liter V-6 felt so burdened by the crossover’s plus-sized weight — it comes in at nearly 5,000 pounds, much more than most minivans — it had a hard time generating good passing power. That’s not the case anymore. Aided by direct-injection technology, today’s Enclave has surprising pep. It moves out from stoplights and makes quick work of uphill on-ramps; the standard six-speed automatic upshifts smoothly and kicks down without too much delay.

With seven adults in our front-drive test vehicle, getting up to highway speeds took about all the power the Enclave could muster — but the V-6 was up to the task. All-wheel drive adds another 200 pounds, but short of a full passenger load, that extra weight shouldn’t bother the Enclave.

Four-wheel-disc antilock brakes are standard. The pedal feels mushy, and even modest stops induce plenty of forward suspension dive. The Enclave’s EPA gas mileage, at 17/24 mpg city/highway, nearly matches most mom-mobiles, and it’s competitive with other large crossovers. All-wheel drive knocks mileage down to 16/22 mpg. The Enclave also runs fine on regular gas; several luxury competitors recommend or require premium.

Though all crossovers employ carlike independent suspensions, that doesn’t always guarantee ride comfort. Buick has done a nice job here. Nineteen-inch wheels are standard, but even with my tester’s optional 20-inch wheels and P255/50R20 tires, the Enclave absorbs bumps and masks highway imperfections well. What’s more, it doesn’t come off feeling floaty and uncontrolled, which is a downside of many soft-riding SUVs, in the process.

At low speeds, the steering wheel turns with light effort and buttery smoothness. The Enclave has numb reflexes and plenty of body roll, but it points where you want easily enough. At highway speeds, the wheel has appropriately low assist and requires few corrections to stay on course.

Roomy, For a Crossover
With convincing faux aluminum trim, upholstered window pillars and plenty of low-gloss, padded surfaces, the Enclave’s cabin feels richer than any well-optioned minivan’s — not to mention its GM siblings. Roomy front seats, a high driving position and an easy-access third row, on the other hand, create a similar feeling: “It’s like a minivan in here,” one backseat passenger said.

Well, almost. The Enclave’s seven seats — eight, if you swap the second-row captain’s chairs for a three-seat bench — and 153 cubic feet of passenger space beat other crossovers but fall short of a Toyota Sienna or Honda Odyssey. That becomes apparent in the second row, where adults will find ample legroom but not enough thigh support. The captain’s chairs sit too low to the ground, and their narrow seatbacks could have larger passengers insisting on sitting up front.

Provided those in the adjustable second-row seats can scoot forward a few clicks, third-row passengers should have enough legroom. The bench seat sits very close to the floor, but so do most third rows.

Behind the third row is 23.2 cubic feet of cargo room, which ranks at the top of the crossover class. Fold all the seats down, and the Enclave’s 115.3 cubic feet of cargo volume is similarly impressive. See how it stacks up against a few competitors — as well as a minivan:

Cargo Room Compared
  2010 Acura MDX 2010 Volvo XC90 2010 Buick Enclave 2011 Toyota Sienna
Base price $42,230 $37,700 $35,515 $24,260
Overall length (in.) 191.6 189.3 201.5 200.2
Maximum seats 7 7 8 8
Cargo behind 3rd row (cu. ft.) 15.0 8.8 23.2 39.1
Cargo behind 2nd row (cu. ft.) 42.9 43.3 67.5 87.1
Cargo behind 1st row (cu. ft.) 83.5 85.1 115.3 150.0
Source: Automakers

Safety, Reliability & Features
In front, side and rear-impact crash tests by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, the Enclave scored the top rating, Good. IIHS has yet to perform its new roof-strength tests on the SUV. Standard safety features include front, side-impact and three-row curtain airbags. Antilock brakes and an electronic stability system are also standard; click here to view a full list.

In nearly three years on the market, the Enclave’s reliability has been average — better than the Acadia but worse than the Traverse. The MDX and Lexus RX fare better; the XC90 and Audi Q7 fare worse.

At $35,515, the front-wheel-drive Enclave CX has family-friendly features like a power liftgate, dual-zone automatic climate control in front with manual rear controls, power front seats, and a CD stereo with an auxiliary MP3 jack and steering-wheel audio controls. The leather-upholstered CXL-1 runs $38,630, while the top-of-the-line CXL-2 runs $41,995. On any trim, all-wheel drive adds $2,000. Available features on higher trims include heated and cooled seats, a moonroof with a fixed second-row skylight, a navigation system, rear parking sensors and a backup camera.

Load the Enclave up, and an all-wheel-drive CXL-2 tops out at just over $50,000.

Enclave in the Market
Though today’s minivans have enough options to spiral beyond $40,000, the market never really saw the need for a dedicated luxury model. Instead we have a collection of luxury crossovers and SUVs, many of which give up a big chunk of utility in the name of styling, performance or plain old opulence. The Enclave provides a compelling response to that: For a reasonable price, it combines near-minivan utility with entry-luxury quality. That’s a rare combination.

Do car shoppers want something like this? I’d say so. Enclave sales are up more than 30 percent in 2010, making it one of GM’s rising stars. Some areas — namely styling and cabin design — will impress less as fresh competition arrives over the next few years, but I suspect the Enclave’s inherent qualities will be harder to beat.

Send Kelsey an email  

Consumer Reviews

What drivers are saying

4.2
59 reviews — Read All reviews
Exterior Styling
(4.6)
Performance
(4.2)
Interior Design
(4.7)
Comfort
(4.8)
Reliability
(4.1)
Value For The Money
(4.1)

Read reviews that mention:

(5.0)

My ruby ride!

by Mrs..jrl from Mt.zion il on October 30, 2019

Love this car just wish had more usb ports but its a great car to be used. It has been very well taken care of. Glad i got it Read full review

(4.0)

Most luxurious vehicle We ever owned.

by RickRose from California on September 29, 2019

We just purchased a 2010 Buick Enclave with 60,000 miles and right after we drove out of the dealership noticed the ac not blowing cold so they fix the problem without any cost. Hopefully nothings ... Read full review

Safety

Recalls and crash tests

Recalls

The 2010 Buick Enclave currently has 4 recalls


Crash and Rollover Test Ratings

The 2010 Buick Enclave has not been tested.

Warranty

New car and certified pre-owned programs by Buick

New Car Program Benefits

  • Bumper-to-Bumper

    48 months / 50,000 miles

  • Powertrain

    60 months / 100,000 miles

  • Roadside Assistance

    60 months / 100,000 miles

Certified Pre-Owned Program Benefits

  • Maximum Age/Mileage

    5 model years or newer/up to 75,000 miles

  • Basic Warranty Terms

    12 months/12,000 miles bumper-to-bumper original warranty, then may continue to 6 years/100,000 miles limited (depending on variables)

  • Powertrain

    6 years/100,000 miles

  • Dealer Certification Required

    172-point inspection

  • Roadside Assistance

    Yes

  • View All CPO Program Details

Latest 2010 Enclave Stories

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Cars.com Car Seat Check

Certified child passenger safety technicians conduct hands-on tests of a car’s Latch system and check the vehicle’s ability to accommodate different types of car seats. The Enclave received the following grades on a scale of A-F.*
* This score may not apply to all trims, especially for vehicles with multiple body styles that affect the space and design of the seating.

Warranty FAQs

What is a Bumper-to-Bumper warranty?

Often called a basic warranty or new-vehicle warranty, a bumper-to-bumper policy covers components like air conditioning, audio systems, vehicle sensors, fuel systems and major electrical components. Most policies exclude regular maintenance like fluid top offs and oil changes, but a few brands have separate free-maintenance provisions, and those that do offer them is slowly rising. Bumper-to-bumper warranties typically expire faster than powertrain warranties.

What is a Powertrain warranty?

Don't be misled a 10-year or 100,000-mile powertrain warranty doesn't promise a decade of free repairs for your car. It typically covers just the engine and transmission, along with any other moving parts that lead to the wheels, like the driveshaft and constant velocity joints. Some automakers also bundle seat belts and airbags into their powertrain warranties. With a few exceptions, powertrain warranties don't cover regular maintenance like engine tuneups and tire rotations.

What is included in Roadside Assistance?

Some automakers include roadside assistance with their bumper-to-bumper or powertrain warranties, while others have separate policies. These programs cover anything from flat-tire changes and locksmith services to jump-starts and towing. Few reimburse incidental costs like motel rooms (if you have to wait for repairs).

What other services could be included in a warranty?

Some automakers include free scheduled maintenance for items such as oil changes, air filters and tire rotations. Some include consumables including brake pads and windshield wipers; others do not. They are typically for the first couple of years of ownership of a new car.

What does CPO mean?

A certified pre-owned or CPO car has been inspected to meet minimum quality standards and typically includes some type of warranty. While dealers and third parties certify cars, the gold standard is an automaker-certified vehicle that provides a factory-backed warranty, often extending the original coverage. Vehicles must be in excellent condition and have low miles and wear to be certified, which is why off-lease vehicles feed many CPO programs.

See also the latest CPO incentives by automaker

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